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10-06-18

At the end of a week when we heard that people who don’t drink alcohol are far more likely to take time off work for sick leave than people who drink in moderation, and the well-known food company Heinz plan to remarket Salad Cream as ‘Sandwich Cream’, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday Franco Manni, former CLG Steering Group member and current PhD student at Kings College London, presented his fascinating lecture, 'Herbert McCabe and his Legacy'.

Born in Middlesborough in 1926, Herbert McCabe joined the Dominican order where he studied theology and became a friar and a priest. In Franco’s lecture we heard of McCabe’s enthusiastic admiration of medieval theologian, Thomas Aquinas and his aim to relate his thought to the philosophy of language espoused by 20th century philosopher and logician, Ludwig Wittgenstein.

Franco split the lecture into two parts, McCabe’s ideas about God followed by McCabe’s ideas about human beings. In respect of McCabe’s ideas about God, Franco showed how McCabe’s ideas on the ‘Argument from Design’ criticise both what atheists and theists say, his standpoint being both to defend the Christian religion whilst simultaneously supporting the findings of science. Franco drew on the ideas of Richard Dawkins concerning this area of theology and then moved on to the critique put forward by McCabe.

In the section on McCabe’s ideas about human beings, we looked at his admiration for the work of Aristotle, Aquinas and then moved to his fondness for the work of Wittgenstein and De Saussure. The relations of the soul and the body came under discussion, as did sentience, meaning and linguistics.

This was a very thought provoking lecture, straddling the realms of theology, philosophy and linguistics, which stimulated the minds of attendees. This was evident in the vibrant and dynamic discussion which took place with Franco during the Research & Discussion Forum. Many thanks to Franco for taking time out from his PhD to talk with us. We wish him great success in his studies.

I will aim to add the recording of


This week…

This coming Wednesday (13th June 2018) Dr Michelle Swainson, Lecturer in Physiology with the Faculty of Health and Medicine at Lancaster University, will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Should Fitness be a Clinical Vital Sign?'

This talk will provide an evidence-based insight into the associations between cardiorespiratory fitness and several health and medical conditions, as well as highlighting the links between fitness and mortality. Fitness is not routinely assessed in clinical practice but this presentation aims to make the case that it should be considered as a clinical vital sign.

Michelle’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum which will give attendees a chance to look closer at ideas raised in the lecture.

Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.



Other news…


We’ve been asked to inform you about a new opportunity to take part in some current research.

‘Understanding Health Related Information’

Being able to understand what we read is very important, particularly when the information is about our health. This research examines why health-related information might be understood differently by people.

You must be aged 25-35 or 65-75 to take part.

Volunteers are needed to complete a number of computer-based tasks, including reading, word recognition tasks and number/pattern puzzles.

If you take part in this research you will be paid £7.50 for 1 hour of your time.

If you’d like to be involved, or would like more information, please contact Sarah Chadwick:
s.chadwick4@lancaster.ac.uk


Thanks for your attention, have a good week,



04-06-18

At the end of a week when it was announced that technology giants including rival firms Google, Apple and Microsoft, operating as the non-profit USB Implementers Forum, have come together to create a new standard for Braille computer accessories in the hope that the standard will contribute to making computing more accessible to blind users and those with visual impairments, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday we were visited by Dr Kathryn Mackay, lecturer, with the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University who presented her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Truth, Trust and Propaganda'.

Kathryn’s interests lie in issues at the intersection of feminist theory, political philosophy, and moral theory. In the lecture, Kathryn explored campaigns which use rhetoric and manipulation of the political discourse to achieve societal changes. Her main focus in the lecture was on public health promotion campaigns (specifically around obesity), the way that these are used to redirect behaviour, and how they undermine and distract from government responsibilities to citizens. During the lecture, we were asked to critique the campaigns we were exploring, with particular focus on agency. The group found the lecture interesting and stimulating, and this was reflected in the vibrant discussion which followed.
I hope to post the audio of the lecture online soon, when we have permission in place:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures
This week…
This coming Wednesday (6th June 2018) our good friend and one time Steering Group member, Franco Manni, who is currently undertaking his PhD at King’s College London, will visit us to present his lecture, 'Herbert McCabe and his Legacy'.
‘Only some professional Anglophone theologians know McCabe. He was not an academic, he did not write books, his works have not been translated and, even though he was even better in philosophy than he was in theology, philosophers of today do not know him. However, some distinguished intellectuals were influenced by him, such as Alasdair MacIntyre, Terry Eagleton and Rowan Williams. His speech and prose were persuasive at the highest degree.’
In this lecture Franco will present a few of McCabe’s paradoxical and deep ideas: because God is omnipotent, he does not make any change in the universe; the brain is not the organ of human thought; without love you cannot live, but if you love enough you will be killed.
Many of you will remember Franco from the work he has done with the CLG in the past including some excellent lectures. We are very pleased to be able to welcome Franco back to present his lecture on McCabe.
Other news…
We have received a request for participants to take part in an interesting research opportunity on campus:
‘My name is Michelle To and am running a vision experiment to see how observers from different age groups see differences between photographs. So in the experiment, I will be presenting you with pairs of photographs and will ask you to rate how different these images appear to you.
The whole session lasts about 1 hour and you will be compensated £10 in Amazon vouchers for your time and participation. The experiment will take place in Fylde College at Lancaster University.
If you are 60+, have healthy corrected vision, and are interested in participating or would like more information on the experiment, please email me at m.to@lancaster.ac.uk.’
So, you or any friends would like to take part in this research, please drop Michelle an email.
Thanks for your attention, have a good week!



27-05-18


At the end of a week when we saw the President of the United States, Donald Trump and North Korean leader, Kim Jong Un agree to a summit meeting, before breaking it off and then moving on to discussions around resuming their plans, not unlike puppy love teens in the playground during break time, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday we ran a special community-orientated event in Morecambe entitled ‘Active Ageing On The Bay’. With an attendance of 25 people, the event looked at a range of worthwhile themes such as activity for fun in later life, boating as a positive activity for those with cancer, Alexander Technique to create good postural habits, Yoga for suppleness and the benefits of gardening (even of you only have a back yard and an alley). All in all the afternoon, which began with a lovely sociable lunch of complimentary home-made soup and sandwiches, was a great success. The talks were interesting, with some participation by attendees, and there was lots of very useful information around healthy living. The feedback we received was good and I think we made some new Morecambe friends in the process.
I would like to thank all the speakers who kindly gave their time for the event, the Steering Group members who put in the time and effort, and most of all Steering Group member Rita who was a lynch pin in making the event happen, with her knowledge of Morecambe and her connections in the Poulton village area. Many thanks.

I aim to add the audio recordings of the Morecambe session to the main website over the coming days:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



This week…

This coming Wednesday (30th May 2018) Dr Kathryn Mackay, lecturer with the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Truth, Trust and Propaganda'.
Kathryn is interested in issues at the intersection of feminist theory, political philosophy, and moral theory. She spent five years working in health promotion policy before completing her PhD, and this experience informs her work. Kathryn’s research focuses on issues related to social justice, truth-telling, social and personal identity, authenticity and agency, and issues at the margins of society. Her most recent work has focused on public health promotion campaigns (specifically around obesity), the way that these manipulate the political discourse, and how they undermine and distract from government responsibilities to citizens. She is currently working on authenticity and normative authority in 'agency dilemma' cases, and on health promotion campaigns as propaganda.

Kathryn’s lecture will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3, and will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get plenty of chance to discuss themes raised in the lecture.

Events begin at 1pm.

Thank you for attention.
If you have received this email then you have made it through the new data protection rule change procedures (GDPR) and we at the Steering Group would like to express our thanks to you.

If you have friends who no longer receive our correspondence, but would like to, please get them to drop a quick email to seniorlearners@lancaster.ac.uk








13-05-18

At the end of a week when we heard that the investigation set up in 2014 to address a string of allegations surrounding the activities of undercover units, most notably how Scotland Yard spied on the campaign seeking justice for murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence and how undercover officers deceived women into intimate relationships in order to extract information or gain access to organisations, will now not deliver its final report until 2023 at the earliest, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Dr Marcia Smith, Research Associate at Lancaster University Management School presented an interesting and quite different session entitled 'Co-creating an App with Older Adults in a Rural Community to Reduce Social Isolation and Loneliness.'

Marcia presented to us ‘Mobile Age’, the research project she is conducting in South Lakeland, Cumbria. She explained her experience of co-creating mobile apps with older adults with the objective to reduce social isolation and loneliness. Clearly, software applications do not immediately put one in mind of increased face to face experience, organic social interaction or improved non-digital environment. However, with this in mind, Marcia and the team with which she works, have developed an app that can perform on digital tablets and smartphones, which is aimed at isolated older people. The app aims to work on a local level, carrying event information, public service information, travel informationa dn pricing. The app aims to inform users of events taking place, facilitate them to plan travel arrangements in conjunction with others in the local area, and generally facilitate interaction that can then lead to real-world social event participation.

In the session, attendees were given digital tablets to try out the application and give feedback on how we felt it might succeed and where we thought it might be improved. It was refreshing to see technology being used to promote face to face social events, rather than replace them. A thinking-outside-of-the-box experience that puts the user’s wellbeing at the forefront. We wish Marcia and the team great success with this worthwhile project.

If you would like to become part of the development of this application, by using it over a period of time in the run up to release and reporting back on your experience, please drop an email to:
m.t.a.smith1@lancaster.ac.uk



This week…

This coming Wednesday (16th May 2018) as part of Dying Matters Awareness Week, Dr Amy Gadoud, Consultant in Palliative Care and Researcher at the International Observatory on End of Life Care, at Lancaster University will present her session 'Dying Matters- A Doctor’s Point of View'.

Amy’s clinical and research interests are in ensuring good palliative care to all who need it. She especially focuses on palliative care for people with conditions other than cancer such as serious heart and chest diseases. As part of Dying Matters Awareness Week she wishes to open a conversation with the public about death and dying in order to breakdown some of the taboos in society about this topic.

Amy states…

“I am a consultant in palliative medicine at Cumbria Partnership and have funded research time as an honorary senior lecturer at the International Observatory on End of Life Care, Lancaster University. I was (2013-2016) a NIHR clinical lecturer at Hull York Medical School. I have been an invited speaker at Kings College, London, University of Liverpool & University of Sheffield. I have obtained research funding from major bodies e.g. NIHR and Academy of Medical Sciences. My research interest is palliative care for people with heart failure and I use a range of research methods from analysing large datasets to qualitative studies.'

Amy’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will have plenty of chance to further explore the issues raised.

Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.



A little reminder…

As mentioned in a previous email, changes to data protection laws (General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR) come into effect on 25th May 2018. This will affect most organisations, from large corporations to small organisations like the CLG. In order for us to continue to hold your details, eg. Name, email address etc. we will require explicit permission from you personally. So, if you wish to continue to be informed about our lectures and events, and in order to carry on receiving this email newsletter, it is essential that you give us your consent.

To make this as easy as possible, the CLG Steering Group request that, if you haven’t done so already, you reply to is email with your name. To do this, please press ‘REPLY’ to this email (not ‘reply all’), type in your name (and the name of your partner if they also regularly enjoy our information and events) and we will retain your and and email address securely and your communications with us can continue as usual.

If you would like more information about the changes in data law, just send us a request to seniorlearners@lancaster.ac.uk and we will be happy to send you further information.

Many thanks to those prompt readers who got back to us rather quickly, the new email list is up and running in anticipation, and you are on it.

Thanks for your attention and continued support.


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04-05-18

Hello,

At the end of a week when Universities Minister Sam Gyimah announced that universities which “no-platform” controversial speakers will face a Government intervention for the first time in 30 years, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Ryan Evans, PhD Student with the Department of English and Creative Writing here at Lancaster University gave his lecture, 'The Green Crow: An Introduction to the Life and Drama of Sean O' Casey'.

Ryan set the scene by giving us an outline of O’Casey’s formidable personality positioned him in cultural, historic and political terms before moving on to discussion of some of the better known works.

Comparisons were drawn with other great Irish writers, Oscar Wilde, John Millington Synge, William Butler Yeats and Samuel Beckett


After explaining how O’Casey’s work saved the Irish national theatre from collapse, Ryan then went on to discuss various interpretations of his work, performed in Dublin and London and we were able to appreciate the wide scope of the work.

Ryan’s enthusiasm for his area of study was clear and infectious. He kindly stayed through the Research & Discussion Forum answering questions and adding to the discussion. We wish Ryan great success with his PhD and beyond.



This week…

This coming Wednesday (9th May 2018) Dr Marcia Smith, Research Associate with Lancaster University Management School will visit us to present a promising session entitled, 'Co-creating an App with Older Adults in a Rural Community to Reduce Social Isolation and Loneliness.'

Marcia will present Mobile Age, the research project she are conducting in South Lakeland, Cumbria. She will explain her experience of co-creating mobile apps with older adults with the objective to reduce social isolation and loneliness. Marcia will share her learning so far and demonstrate the apps that she has developed.

Marcia’s research aims to understand how the confluence of digital innovations and a culture of co-creation is affecting the clothing industry. The main focus is on how new models of businesses and services could instigate amateurs to create their own clothes with the help of digital innovations.
She undertook her PhD at the HighWire Doctoral Training Centre at Lancaster University, returning to University in 2008, when she joined the Master course in Design Management and Policy at LICA, Lancaster University. Straight after the MA Design course finished, she enrolled in the HighWire programme where she researched, from a post-disciplinary perspective, the issues in the digital economy around how we plan, design and build our digital futures.

Following the lecture, the Research & Discussion Forum will give all attendees chance to discuss Marcia’s ideas and look into further digital concepts that might benefit older people.

Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm onwards.




And finally, a small but important request…

As you may know changes to data protection laws (General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR) come into effect on 25th May 2018. This will affect most organisations, from large corporations to small organisations like the CLG. In order for us to continue to hold your details, eg. Name, email address etc. we will require explicit permission from you personally. So, if you wish to continue to be informed about our lectures and events, and in order to carry on receiving this email newsletter, it is essential that you give us your consent.

To make this as easy as possible, the CLG Steering Group request that you reply to is email with your name. To do this, please press ‘REPLY’ to this email (not ‘reply all’), type in your name (and the name of your partner if they also regularly enjoy our information and events) and we will retain your email address securely and your communications with us can continue as usual.

If you would like anymore information about the changes in data law, just send us a request to seniorlearners@lancaster.ac.uk and we will be happy to send you further information.

I will send this request out again in the run up to the deadline, as we don’t want to lose touch with any of you.

Thanks for your attention and continued support.

Regards,

Dave

(on behalf of the CLG Steering Group)
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29-04-18

At the end of a week when the intense speculation around the Skripal nerve agent poisoning gave way to a very different controversy when a winning entry in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition was disqualified for allegedly featuring a stuffed anteater, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday Peter Reilly presented his Lunchtime Lecture on the subject of Land Value Tax.
In his lecture Peter explored the existing forms of tax which we are all familiar with. We looked at council tax, inheritance tax, VAT etc. Peter discussed the disproportionate effect of these taxes across different socio economic bands and spoke about the how the setting of a tax threshold attempts to alleviate some of this. Peter then went on to discuss the concept of land ownership and how that came about when land was transferred from common ownership to private ownership. He went on to illustrate the difference (practical, moral and ethical) between earned income, unearned income and the use of property as a method of holding and increasing wealth independently of the banking system and how that impacts on society at large. Finally Peter discussed the idea of introducing a land value tax to replace a number of taxes, simplifying the tax system, bypassing tax avoidance and promoting use of land. We then went on in the Research & Discussion Forum to explore and test the ideas Peter had introduced in the lecture, with Peter kindly staying around the take part in the discussion.

If you would like to hear the lecture Peter gave, I will be posting it on our website over the coming days:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


This week…

This coming Wednesday (2nd May 2018) Ryan Evans, PhD Student with the Department of English and Creative Writing at Lancaster University will present his Lunchtime Lecture, 'The Green Crow: An Introduction to the Life and Drama of Sean O' Casey'.

When you think of great Irish writers, who comes to mind? Oscar Wilde? John Millington Synge? William Butler Yeats? Samuel Beckett? What about Sean O'Casey, who saved the Irish national theatre from collapse, who was the inspiration of Samuell Beckett, and whom W.B. Yeats defended so valiantly from the stage? In this lecture, Ryan will discuss the life of Sean O'Casey and his brilliant, and often controversial, drama.

Following the lecture we will hold the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will have plenty of chance to discuss the lecture content.

Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

Please note: This is a reschedule of the lecture which was planned for 14th March 2018.


Thanks for your attention, we hope you can join us.


22-04-18

Hello,

I hope you’ve had a good break over the Easter period, have enjoyed the small amount of sunshine and are ready to join us once more for an exciting summer term of inspiring lectures in a wide range of subjects.

This term, amongst other things, we will examine the use of land value taxation to tackle inequality, explore methods to reduce isolation and loneliness for those of us living in rural areas, and we will examine truth, trust and propaganda. We will explore the exciting work of British theologian Herbert McCabe and dip our toes into the life and drama of Sean O’ Casey.

We also plan a group trip over to West Yorkshire on Wednesday 20th June to visit Harewood House to learn more about the furniture of Thomas Chippendale, following on from Dr Brian Hodgson’s inspiring lecture last term. Harewood House’s collection of Chippendale furniture is being showcased in an exhibition entitled ‘Designer, Maker, Decorator’.

Here is an excerpt from the Harewood House website…

‘To coincide with the national Chippendale 300 celebrations to mark the tercentenary of the birth of Thomas Chippendale, ‘Designer, Maker, Decorator’ will showcase the remarkable range of Chippendale’s work at Harewood House.

Thomas Chippendale (1718 – 1779), born just down the road from Harewood in Otley, was one of 18th century Britain’s finest and most innovative furniture makers.

‘Designer, Maker, Decorator’ offers a new way of looking at his work and a story unique to Harewood, and for the first time, will explore the variety of skills and activity carried out by Chippendale to form the interiors of Harewood House.’

If you feel you would be interested in joining us on what promises to be an outstanding, educational visit, which will cost the entrance fee to Harewood House (£18.50) plus a contribution towards petrol (we hope to take two cars), please send us an email to seniorlearners@lancaster.ac.uk or, alternatively, talk to one of the Steering Group members at the lunchtime lecture, we require an estimate of numbers so we can move forward with the planning of the trip. It’s not necessary to be a regular lecture attendee to come on the trip and you are welcome to bring a friend along too. Just let us know and we will pencil you in. It should be an excellent day with plenty of learning to build on the good work Brian has started.

All in all it is looking like a very exciting summer term ahead!

The Continuing Learning Group returns this coming Wednesday 25th April 2018.
We return to our usual venue, Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 at 1pm. The noisy building work should now be finished, making our usual small, friendly lectures possible once more.

The first lecture of the term will be given by Peter Reilly, formerly of Lancaster University and retired teacher of economics, politics and business studies. The title is 'Land Value Taxation'.
Peter’s lecture will be on the subject of tackling income and wealth inequality.

‘Why is the gap between the rich and poor growing? Is it inevitable in the capitalist system? How far are current government policies responsible? How far can Labour Party policies significantly reduce inequalities without adversely affecting incentives?

Peter will show how economic growth inevitably leads to a redistribution of wealth because economic growth leads to increased land values, and the majority of the land is owned by a small minority of the population. (70% of England is owned by just 1% of the population). Policies to promote growth increases demand for the limited supply of land, driving up its price and benefiting landowners at the expense of others. Public investment in infrastructure, services and amenities actually drives up land prices. Where the taxpayer sews, the landowners reap.

Until this is addressed, wealth inequality is bound to grow. Peter, who has studied property taxes will be putting the case for a system of land value taxation to regain these land values for the public purse.’

We will follow Peter’s lecture with a Research & Discussion Forum to discuss the points that have been raised.

For more information on the lectures and events due to take place this term, please take a look at our website:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

And, if you missed any of last term’s lectures, you can find audio recordings of most of them here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

We hope you can join us for another interesting term before we break for summer.

Best wishes,

Dave

(on behalf of the CLG Steering Group)

18-03-18

At the end of a week when we said goodbye to anti-apartheid activist, academic and feminist
AnnMarie Wolpe, Irish novelist and poet Val Mulkerns, TV gameshow presenter Jim Bowen and theoretical physicist, cosmologist, author and occasional special guest on some of the funkiest American syndicated TV shows Stephen Hawking, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday the CLG paid a second visit to the Campus in the City Street Law sessions. The subject on this occasion being ‘The Importance of Making a Will’.

The session was led by an undergraduate in his first year of law studies, ably assisted by the one of the more experienced Campus in the City staff and Gary Rycroft, the solicitor with Joseph A. Jones & Co. who visited the CLG back in May 2017 to advise us on how we might disinherit our children.

In this short session we learned about the importance of having an adequate will in place, rather than leaving the arrangements to the state to sort out after our death. We learned that a hierarchy exists regarding legacy, and that it does not automatically respect our own particular family structure. Therefore, each person’s legacy intentions should be clearly set out in a will to avoid confusion. The group members were introduced to the pathways open to us when making a will, things to consider, as well as limitations in the breadth and depth covered by a will.

We were also informed about a free Law Clinic which operates on campus during term times. This clinic utilises law students, backed by qualified law practitioners, and aims to provide free advice to all. If you have any legal issues which you need to explore, it may be worth giving the Law Clinic a look. The Clinic is currently having a break, owing to the end of term, but will be available again in around four weeks’ time.

See here for further details:
http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/law/undergraduate/law/law-clinic/



This week…

This coming Wednesday (21st March 2018), due to the end of the UCU industrial action on campus for this present term, we will once again meet back on campus, for our final Lunchtime Lecture of the Lent term. However, we will be meeting in a different room for this session. Bowland North Seminar Room 8. This building runs alongside the Chaplaincy Centre and can be accessed through double doors to the left, in front of the Welcome Centre.

The Lecture will be given by Dr Amin Al-Astewani, lecturer in law with Lancaster University Law School, and is entitled 'The Gay Cake Case: Is English Law Developing a Hierarchy of Rights?'

‘A body of evidence reveals a growing preference in the English courts for subordinating the right to manifest one’s religious beliefs to the right not to be discriminated against on the basis of sexual orientation, even if some form of reasonable accommodation between these rights is possible.

In the 2016 case of Lee vs. Ashers Baking Co. (dubbed the ‘gay cake’ case), the Christian owners of a bakery who had refused to provide a customer with a cake decorated with a slogan in support of same-sex marriage were found to have unlawfully discriminated against him.

The Court of Appeal further held that Equality Act (Sexual Orientation) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2006 were not incompatible with Articles 9, 10, and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights. The judgment highlights the degree to which sexual orientation is not only a protected characteristic, but also a protected ideology, an ideology that now appears to supersede in law the freedom to conduct oneself or one’s business in any way that might signal disagreement with it.’

This lecture promises to be an interesting and controversial one. You may recall Dr Amin Al-Astewani visited us back in June 2017 to lecture on English Human Rights Law and the Use of Religious Symbols. His lecture proved so stimulating that we decided to invite him back to give the final CLG Lunchtime Lecture of this Lent term.

We hope you can make it along to Seminar Room 8 in Bowland North for the usual time of 1pm. There might even be some cake, you never know.



Other news…

We were contacted this week by Dr Jess Wang, Lecturer with the Department of Psychology here at Lancaster University. Her email says…

‘On Friday March 23rd, Lara Warmelink and myself will be showcasing our research at Campus in the City. We are both about to launch new research projects on ageing, and we think it would be wonderful for members of the CLG to come for a taster session. We will be offering demonstration of social and cognitive tasks to the public. We will also talk to people about factors that may explain why older people appear vulnerable to being defrauded-- our accounts relate to the ability to detect lies, and to see the world from others' perspectives.

Jess and Lara will be at Campus in the City in St Nicholas Arcades from 10.30 to 15.30 next Friday if you would like to go along.



And finally….

So with that, we approach the end of the Lent term. It has been quite a different term with lots of change regarding building work going on around campus and the industrial action taking place over recent weeks. We expect to run the postponed lectures sometime later in the year, so nothing of our original planned programme will be missed. We will keep you informed about that as we go.

We return on Wednesday 25th April 2018 when Peter Reilly, former graduate from Lancaster University and retired teacher of economics, politics and business studies will kick off the new term with a Lunchtime Lecture on the subject of tackling income and wealth inequality.

And with that I would like to thank everyone for their support throughout this term.
The CLG Steering Group hope you have a good Easter break and we look forward to returning with longer days and warmer temperatures.

Best wishes,

Dave and the whole CLG Steering Group.



12-03-18

At the end of a week where we said goodbye to pioneering human genome biologist Sir John Sulston, prolific inventor of the wind-up radio Trevor Bayliss, CBE and legendary British comedian Sir Ken Dodd, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week,

Last Wednesday, Due to UCU industrial action taking place on campus, we took the CLG into Lancaster City Centre to attend a Law Clinic session of Campus in the City. The session, entitled ‘Street Law: Protecting Yourself Against Scams and Rogue Traders’ proved to be very informative and useful. Run by two undergraduates from Lancaster University Law School, the session focused on two areas, home callers and internet scams.

The two students, in the final year of their bachelor’s degree, did a wonderful job of presenting some of the more common issues that are aimed at extorting money out of us. These ranged from non-compliance with contracts through to online phishing tactics. The presentation was clear and concise. We then went on to discuss personal experiences of scams, attempted scams and nuisance calls we had endured in the past.

All in all we were made very welcome by the Campus in the City organisers and the law students, staff and associates. We had plenty of chance to chat and ask questions. We would like to thank all concerned for their welcoming and informative session.

This week…

This coming Wednesday (14th March 2018) the UCU staff strike is set to continue. Consequently, the CLG will again attend a Campus in the City event. This week’s Law Clinic event at Campus in the City is entitled ‘Street Law: The Importance of Making a Will’.

Have you ever thought about making a will? Have your needs changed over time so that you might want to revisit an existing will? Street Law will be running an informative session about the importance of will-making, with some guidance on how to get started.

Again, we will meet at Vincenzo’s Café in St Nic’s Arcades at 1pm for a quick coffee and chat then on to the Campus in the City event at 1:30pm.

A full programme of the 5 week long Campus in the City series can be found here:
http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/events/campus-in-the-city/

Up-to-the-minute news on the situation with the UCU pensions strike around the country can be found here:
https://www.ucu.org.uk/strike-action

And finally…

I’m currently working hard editing, uploading and embedding to make our most recent lecture recordings available on our main website. So, if you’re really missing our usual on-campus lectures, why not pop to the website and catch up with a past lecture you may have missed at the time. There are plenty to choose from and have been listened to over 2,170 times by learners across the globe. We have CLG Lunchtime Lecture fans in more than 50 countries! Our top ten countries for remote listeners currently are: UK, USA, Italy, Germany, Netherlands, France, Canada, Egypt, Brazil and India.

You can find our lecture recordings here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures




05-03-18

At the end of a week which saw the United Kingdom plunged into chaos as the Beast from the East met the Pest from the West, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, as you know, there was no Lunchtime Lecture due to the widespread industrial action called by the University and College Union over changes to the USS pension scheme, however Janet and I went along to the UCU picket line at the entrance to campus by the Sports Centre. There was a fair sized gathering of people assembled there, lecturers, office staff, students and volunteers. The atmosphere was lively despite the abundance of snow underfoot. Blue skies prevailed as the crowd, banners in hands, sang a hearty rendition of Queen’s ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’. We were introduced to the crowd via a megaphone (essential of course at any industrial action event!) and we were welcomed with a round of applause. Janet then said a few words about our education programme, our decision to support the action and, as older people, our appreciation of the importance of an adequate pension in later life. This was well received and we were thanked for our support and efforts to take part despite the searing cold.


This week…

This coming Wednesday (7th March 2018) we will pay a visit to ‘Campus in the City’, Lancaster University’s annual programme bringing lectures, workshops and learning sessions to the City Centre, namely Saint Nicholas Arcades (St. Nics). The session we will attend, is entitled ‘Street Law - Protecting yourself against scams and rogue traders’.

From the Lancaster University website…

‘Campus in the City (CITC) is a five week project which sees Lancaster University's world class research brought to life in an informal and accessible setting in St Nicholas Arcades.

Now in its fourth season, CITC brings local people, academics and students together through an exciting programme of free and interactive activities which explore a wide range of topics, including child development, green technology, social media psychology, practical legal advice and the human body. Aiming to challenge, inspire and inform, it also provides opportunities for the local community to get involved with research projects, helping to shape the world around us.’

Law focused sessions will be running from 10:45 on Wednesday. However, we will meet at Vincenzo's Coffee House (also in St. Nics, by Boots) at 1pm to attend the afternoon session.

For more information about the ‘Campus in the City’ sessions, visit here:
http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/media/lancaster-university/content-assets/documents/alumni/CITC2018Planner.pdf

For more information on our CLG events for the rest of term, visit our website here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

We hope you can join us.


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25-02-18

At the end of a week in which a Norfolk school added the “meet me at McDonald’s” to its list of banned haircuts (close-cropped sides, voluminous, perm-like thatch on top, popular with the boys), we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, after a change of venue due to the extensive and noisy building work taking place in almost every part of campus, we had a session with a different flavour as Prototype Theatre Company visited us for an afternoon of chat on the subject of money. Prototype are currently creating their new show which premiers in Lancaster this Tuesday, and they wanted to speak to as broad a range of people as possible to draw on our experiences so that this might enhance their understanding and, in turn, add to the insight contained in their show.

‘Rich Tea and Currency’ presented a great chance for all group members to chat informally about what money means to us, how we feel about it and how access to money has changed over our lifetime. From the restrictions on mortgages for women in the past, to the zero hours contracts restricting access to mortgages for both women and men in contemporary society, we looked at how access to money has ebbed and flowed over time. We were able to see how severely limited income, which was the reality for many group members in their younger days, is firmly back on the table for many working and non-working people today. We looked at the change from traditional, agreed loans for specific, large projects such as homes, cars and holidays, to the current situation where those loans are also accompanied by permanently accessible credit for everyday items as well, creating a total debt orientated society.

We looked at regular-income security and how that has been eroded over time. We questioned the legitimacy of a monetary system which, even when honoured by the majority, fails to serve them adequately. We also looked at the myth of the ‘trickle down’ system and we pondered on the amount of money that is filtered out of the system into offshore accounts by the major players, with consequences for society as a whole. Finally we looked at the financial system as it is presented to us, compared to the financial system as it is in reality.

The afternoon was a great chance for all involved to get a better understanding on the role of money in our (and each other’s) lives, where it benefits us and where it holds us back. The CLG would like to thank Rachel and Gillian of Prototype, as well as Alice and Olwen from the University, for this chance to have a vibrant and stimulating conversation on (an often) controversial subject which affects us all.

The Proto-type Theatre production entitled ‘The Audit (or Iceland, A Modern Myth)’ will take place at Lancaster Arts at Lancaster University on Tuesday 27th February 2018. CLG members have kindly been offered a 2 for 1 on tickets purchased.

For more information please visit the website:
www.proto-type.org


This week…

This coming Wednesday (28th February 2018) there will be no CLG due to industrial action led by UCU.
The strike focuses on lecturers who belong to the University and College Union (UCU). They are taking action against suggested changes to their pensions.

Here is a short excerpt of a statement from the UCU website…

‘No education professional wants to strike but we also deserve long-term security and our students deserve staff who are able to focus fully on the job. We have called for extended negotiations with the employers but, disappointingly, talks ended with the changes being imposed.’

If you would like to know more about this industrial action you can do so on the Lancaster University portal here:
https://portal.lancaster.ac.uk/student/news/5536959/strike-faqs-for-students

The BBC news here:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-43140729

And the UCU website here:
https://www.ucu.org.uk/why-we-are-taking-action-over-USS


Our proposed Lunchtime Lecture by Dr Penny Foulds, Honorary Researcher with Lancaster University,
'How to Reduce Your Risk of Dementia - The Science Behind the Myths' will be rescheduled for further down the line. We apologise for this last minute change to the programme.

The following Wednesday (7th March 2018) we intend to visit ‘Campus in the City’ which takes place in Lancaster City Centre, to a session entitled ‘Street Law - Protecting yourself against scams and rogue traders’. More about this event will be included in next week’s CLG News.


And finally…

Lancaster Arts Partners is running a ‘Network Gathering of the Arts & Cultural Communities in Lancaster District’ event at the Storey this coming Wednesday, 28th February 2018 from 4:30pm till 6:30pm.

The February network gathering is an opportunity to share key cultural calendar events and programme for the year ahead and to meet up, talk, make new connections and collaborations, and discuss joint initiatives and promotions.

For more information and booking for this event, go here:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/network-gathering-of-the-arts-cultural-communities-in-lancaster-district-tickets-42904623885?aff=es2

Thanks for your attention, have a good week.



18-02-18

At the end of a week when we heard that the social media giant, Facebook is facing a UK youth exodus, just as it becomes a favoured destination for over-55s, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…


Last Wednesday Chris Coates and Dave Barton came to talk with us about the exciting forthcoming development phase of the Halton Co-housing Project, A senior Co-Housing project which aims to bring older people together to live in a mutually supportive, sustainable, not-for-profit way.


Firstly we heard from Dave Barton, who is a member of the steering group for the Senior Co-housing Project, about what the project aims to do and how that will be of benefit to the residents. Dave, and his partner plan to live in one of the houses/apartments when they are complete, though this is a few of years away as the project is still at the planning stage. Dave spoke of the advantages he and his partner would enjoy by growing older in a community-based environment which works together for the good of all.


We then watched a short film about a successful similar project in London known as OWCH - Older Women's Co-Housing - whose New Ground co-housing development in Muswell Hill is now up and running. You can view the video here:
https://vimeo.com/242947993


Following the short film Chris, who was part of the management team for the original ground-breaking Co-Housing project at Halton, spoke about how the new project might work, what has been learned from the original project and how the new project aims to relate to it in terms of sustainability, ecological awareness and communal planning for such things as laundry, transport, cooking and dining etc. This was a great chance to reflect on the existing project and imagine the relationship necessary to make the new project equally successful.


I will post the audio recording of this talk online shortly:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



This week…


This coming Wednesday (21st February 2018) we have a visit from Proto-type Theatre who will come and chat with us about their work in a session called 'Rich Tea and Currency'.


For the last year, Proto-type Theatre have been making The Audit (Or Iceland, a modern myth), a theatre performance about money, global inequality, protest and power. The show premieres at Lancaster Arts on the 27th Feb, and the company will be in residence with Lancaster University from 19th - 27th Feb.


The company have made the show to help them think about the economic structures that govern our lives, and how are they affecting us and those around us. Along the way they've been talking to communities across the country to share experiences and widen the discussion.


Proto-type will host ‘Rich Tea and Currency’ with the Continuing Learning Group this coming week. It will be a discussion event with no agenda or objectives. They will serve hot drinks, Rich Tea biscuits (and maybe even currant-cy-buns...) ‘Rich Tea and Currency’ is an accessible, respectful and confidential space where a group comes together to discuss and freely share their thoughts around the difficult, and oft-times taboo subject of MONEY.


Though they are visiting us this week, their performance will take place on campus on Tuesday 27th February at 8pm. If you would like to attend the performance, please refer to the Lancaster Arts website for tickets:
https://www.lancasterarts.org/whats-on/proto-type-theater-the-audit


‘Rich Tea and Currency’ will take place in our usual venue, Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 this coming Wednesday from 1pm.


Thanks for your attention, have a good week.

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11-02-18

At the end of a week when we heard of the imminent arrival of a platoon of 10 Chinese Terracotta Warriors, leaving their home in Shaanxi province for the first time in their 2,200 year history to go on display in Merseyside’s World Museum, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday our very own Janet Ross presented her Lunchtime Lecture, 'In search of the North West Passage.'

2018 is the 200 years Anniversary of the first British Scientific Expedition to the Arctic. Led by Captain John Ross, a forgotten hero of Victorian exploration. The expedition had the wrong equipment, an unsuitable crew and no clear leader, but led to many exciting discoveries including the location of the magnetic north pole and strategies for survival in the most inhospitable climate imaginable.

In this enjoyable lecture, Janet told us the extraordinary story she is currently documenting of Captain Ross’s journey up into the Arctic. We heard about the trials and tribulations he and his crew faced. How they were beset with huge challenges over a four year period and how Ross’s foresight and willingness to work with the indigenous Inuit (not the usual approach of a British Royal Naval Captain) meant that he and his crew were able to survive such harsh conditions. Conditions that overcame many other explorers of the frozen polar region.

Janet then followed up with some chat and photos of her recent travels as a crew member of a tall ship sailing to the Cape Verde Islands, giving her some further insight into the life of her ancestor and his fellow adventurers.

I will post the audio recording of Janet’s excellent Lunchtime Lecture online over the coming days:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

This week…

This coming Wednesday (14th February 2018) Chris Coates and members of the Halton Senior Co-Housing Project will visit us to talk on the subject of 'Senior Co-Housing'.

Can co-housing for older people offer a convivial and sustainable life-style for older people in the 21st Century?

Chris is a time-served carpenter who now works as project manager on community based construction projects. He was part of the management team for the ground-breaking Co-Housing project at Halton and has previously worked on projects for the Ecology Building Society and Welfare State International.

Chris has been representing people as both a city and a county councillor in Lancaster district since 2003, and is well aware of public feelings towards the challenges and opportunities we face in achieving a sustainable society.

In this talk we will hear how the ideologies and practical construction techniques that have made the Halton Co-Housing Project successful might be adapted with the view to creating a successful environment for older people to live well alongside the original project.

We will then go on to have a Research & Discussion Forum to further explore the ideas from the lecture.


Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

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04-02 18

At the end of a week when it was announced that Mastermind contestants have been stopped from choosing Harry Potter, Fawlty Towers, Blackadder and Roald Dahl as their specialist subjects because researchers have run out of questions, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday Professor Gill Baynes expertly presented her fascinating lecture on the Human Genome Project. Gill did a wonderful job of taking a rather complex scientific project and enlightening the group to the facts and leading us into a discussion around the ethical implications of genetic developments.

We looked at the genetic basis of a number of conditions, then looked at how scientific developments have aimed to address these. We explored how specific genetic targeting can be and the different types of genetic modifications that are available for use, should we wish to implement them. Gill peppered her presentation with humorous cartoons she has collected along the way from the media. A nice touch.

Gill then left us with a large list of issues around genetic modification which we were able to debate during the Research & Discussion Forum as to their potentials, pitfalls, ethical and social implications etc. This made for a vibrant and creative discussion with a substantial amount of common ideological ground shared between group members, which was encouraging.

This week…

This coming Wednesday (7th February 2018) Janet Ross, CLG Steering Group Member will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'In search of the North West Passage.'

2018 is the 200 years Anniversary of the first British Scientific Expedition to the Arctic. Led by Captain John Ross, a forgotten hero of Victorian exploration. The expedition had the wrong equipment, an unsuitable crew and no clear leader, but led to many exciting discoveries including the location of the magnetic north pole and strategies for survival in the most inhospitable climate imaginable.

In this lecture, Steering Group member Janet, who has just returned from her own adventure on the high seas in a tall ship, will take us all on an exploration into the life and times of this fascinating explorer.

We will follow the lecture with plenty of chat around the themes raised.

Events take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

More information on this term’s Lunchtime Lectures can be found here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures


Have a great week!



28-01-18

At the end of a week which saw a survey by the Royal Society of Arts and Populus, suggest that less than one third of British workers live “comfortably”, with 40% in a “financially precarious” situation, and the remaining 30% not able to get by, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday our good friend and group member Brian Hodgson presented an excellent lecture on the work of the celebrated master craftsman, Thomas Chippendale. In this lecture, which was a follow on lecture from and earlier one focusing on Hogarth and Chippendale, Brian examined the designs contained in in Chippendale’s book The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director. We saw how perspective was presented, often distorted, and how measurements were concealed, possibly to keep the designs from being copied easily.

Brian showed us how cabriole legs were hewn from single pieces of timber and how joints were constructed with the aid of mortice and tenon joints (for weight supporting elements) and dowels (for non-weight bearing, decorative elements). We went on to look at wood types and spent some time enjoying the fine points of veneering, the level of accuracy needed to veneer effectively and the advantages it brings, despite the current trend regarding veneering as a method of compromise in modern furniture.

We then went on to enjoy lots of chat in the Research & Discussion Forum and explored the possibility of an excursion to visit a collection of Chippendale furniture in the future, with Harewood House coming out as favorite due to the quality of the furniture and its proximity to Lancaster. More on that further down the line.

I will be posting the audio recording of the lecture here soon:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


This week…

This coming Wednesday (31st January 2018) Professor Gill Baynes, former Professor of Medical Imaging Education at the University of Cumbria, former Chair of Lancaster & Morecambe U3A and current CLG Steering Group Member, will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Unpacking the Human Genome Project'.

You all know Gill from her recent sessions where she presented us with excellent lectures on medical ethics and various aspects of medical research. We are very pleased to welcome Gill back to give us a lecture on the fascinating subject of the Human Genome Project.

Gill’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get the chance to further explore ideas around the science of the Human Genome Project.

Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.





22-01-18

At the end of a week which has seen the TV news, social media and dinner party tables across the globe alive with vibrant discussion of Prince William’s new hair style, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.



Last week…


Last Wednesday Dr Sam Clark of the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University presented his Lunchtime Lecture, 'Transformative Experience'.


In this thought provoking lecture, Sam explored a range of experiences, with particular focus on major experiences - becoming a parent, fighting in a war, becoming seriously ill - experiences which are transformative in a double sense: (1) you can’t know what they’re like until you have them; and (2) you are changed by them - maybe so much that you’re a different person afterwards. This premise immediately created an interesting thought experiment and took the group off into philosophical territory.


Sam’s interests focus on the self; in good and bad lives it might lead; in its reflexive powers and practices; in the roles of experience, reflection, and institutions in its development and success; and in how to do philosophy so as to advance our understanding of these issues.


As we progressed through the lecture we were faced with a number of interesting, perennial philosophical issues around the nature of the self and its relationship with its environment, presented in a stimulating and enthusiastic way, taking the group on an introspective journey.


We then went on to have a lively Research & Discussion Forum, where Sam kindly took part and added further to the group discussion.


I will be posting Sam’s lecture online in audio format over the coming weeks in case you missed it and would like to catch up:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures




This week…


This coming Wednesday (24th January 2018) Dr Brian Hodgson, formerly of Lancaster University Ruskin Centre, current member of The Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining (IOM3) and also a member of the CLG, will present his lecture, 'Thomas Chippendale'.


In this, the second of his lectures on Thomas Chippendale, Brian will convey something of the materials and techniques he (or rather his workshop) used. We will look at Chippendale’s place in the Age of Mahogany, the importance of the Cabriole leg and his use of veneers in cabinet work. We will also look again at his Director and study his technical projection techniques.


We will also discuss a proposed future group visit to Dumfries House.


Brian’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, giving us all a chance to further explore ideas around design and craftsmanship.


Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm onwards.


For more information on this term’s Lunchtime Lectures, please see the here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures



Thanks for your attention, have a good week.

15-01-18

Hello,

I hope you’ve had a good break and are ready for an action packed new term with the Continuing Learning Group.

Our new term begins this coming Wednesday (17th January 2018) with Dr Sam Clark of the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University. Sam will present his Lunchtime Lecture, 'Transformative Experience'.

Some experiences—becoming a parent, fighting in a war, becoming seriously ill—are transformative in a double sense: (1) you can’t know what they’re like until you have them; and (2) you are changed by them—maybe so much that you’re a different person afterwards. This talk explores some examples and consequences of transformative experience.

Sam is interested in the self; in good and bad lives it might lead; in its reflexive powers and practices; in the roles of experience, reflection, and institutions in its development and success; and in how to do philosophy so as to advance our understanding of these issues.

These interests have lead Sam to think, write, and teach about capitalism and anarchism; utopias, dialogues, and autobiographies; well-being, pleasure, and self-realization; self-knowledge, self-interpretation, and self-command; the lives and experiences of monks, soldiers, hermits, and solo travellers; and the transformative effects of work and war.

His current work is philosophy of and through autobiography, and as part of it Sam has published articles in journals including Inquiry, Ratio, Res Publica, and The Journal of Applied Philosophy, and in the Blackwell Companion to John Stuart Mill. He is currently writing a book about autobiography, narrative, and self-realization, under the working title Good Lives: see https://goodlivesbook.wordpress.com/

We will follow Sam’s lecture with the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will have the chance to continue discussion around the themes of the lecture.

Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm onwards.

If you would like to see the term’s programme of Lunchtime Lectures you can do so here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures


Other News…

You may be familiar with our group member, Dr Mary Searle-Chatterjee, who has also provided us with a number of excellent lectures. Well, Mary has asked me to tell you about a forthcoming lecture series she has organised…

Rethinking British Imperial History

This four week course will take place at Halton Mill, created and presented by Dr Mary Searle-Chatterjee, formerly of Manchester University Centre for Applied South Asian Studies.

This lecture/discussion course will examine current conflicting interpretations of Britain’s rise to power. Topics will include:

  • The World before British and European Empires
  • Theories of British exceptionalism (cultural, institutional, environmental)
  • Political/economic critiques of theories of exceptionalism, and
  • Lancashire textiles and the Indian connection.

Mary is a fascinating lecturer and there’ll be lots of chance for discussion and argument.

Book at: greenelephantcoop@gmail.com
Or alternatively…
Tel. 07778737681
There is a £40 charge for the course.

The course is to be offered twice:

1) Tuesday mornings 10.30 – 12.30 (Feb. 20 and 27 and March 6 and 8)

2) Tuesday evenings 7-9 (April 17 and 24 and May 1 and 8)



Thanks for your attention.
Here’s wishing us all a truly great 2018!

Dave

(on behalf of the CLG Steering Group)


10-12-17

At the end of a week which saw some movement in the British Government’s negotiations to extricate the United Kingdom from the European Union and the emergency services called to assist a Youtube prankster to extricate his head after cementing it inside a microwave oven, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.



Last Week…

Last Wednesday Dan Degerman, PhD Student with the Department of Politics, Philosophy & Religion at Lancaster University, presented his Lunchtime Lecture, 'Brexit Anxiety: A case study in the medicalization of dissent'.

Dan began his lecture by looking at the reports in the British press which appeared following the referendum, claiming people were ‘flooding psychiatric clinics’ to receive care for their Brexit-related emotional suffering, and we explored whether this was an accurate portrayal of the facts or not. We watched a short piece of film of a distressed person visiting a hypnotherapist to deal with anxiety issues which he claimed revolved around the Brexit referendum. We heard how he was struggling with the things he was reading on social media and that the quality of his mental health was under threat from the barrage of information he was trying to process on the referendum outcome. We then saw the man discuss how much better he felt after the hypnotherapy. This raised a number of questions around the man’s ongoing mental health outside of the referendum event, as well as the effect of intensive social media use on mental wellbeing.

Dan then went on to look at the phenomenon of ‘medicalization of dissent’ and looked at how changes in the status quo can necessitate an end to the debate to avoid the exposure of further facts which may in turn threaten the new order. He examined both the methods of normalization which were employed immediately following the referendum and the methods of ‘othering’ employed, including claims of madness and mental health instability, while discounting (often valid) political concerns. Finally we looked at how this has affected voter’s capacity and will to participate in the political debate.

Dan’s background in philosophy and ethics, as well as his knowledge in political and legal theory, was evident and resulted in a very interesting lecture which worked on a number of levels and raised as many new questions as it answered. I hope to receive permission to put the audio recording online over the next few weeks:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures




This Week…

This coming Wednesday (13th December 2017) Barbara Coulton, CLG Group Member will present our last Lunchtime Lecture of this term and, indeed, this year, entitled 'The Vikings?'

Many of you will know Barbara from her attendance at our meetings and her inimitable input in our Research & Discussion Forums. Barbara studied at the Institute of Archeology, London University...She did a lot of digging! Later she shifted her focus from the Mediterranean to the Near East. She also has an interest in the Anglo-Saxon and Norse people. Though she hasn't studied in the native Scandinavian languages, she has carried out extensive studies in English and has visited a number of important sites as she has gone along.

In this talk Barbara aims to ‘pass on what is known as well as what is not known’.

We will finish the afternoon with a Jacob's Join and a good old fashioned chat as we catch up on news and gossip and look forward to our break over the Christmas period. Please bring food or beverages to share if you can. Don’t worry if you can’t.



Other News…

Here is a research project participation opportunity you may like to be involved with:

We are looking for participant aged between 40-49 years and 60+ to take part in a study investigating how the human perceives visual images.

The study will take approximately 60-90 minutes and you will be paid £10 for your time.

If you are interested in taking part, you can sign up via the university’s participant recruitment system:
https://lancs.sona-systems.com
Or alternatively…
Email Chloe Newbury
c.newbury@lancaster.ac.uk



And Finally…

Well, that just leaves me to wish you compliments of the season. I hope that whatever form your celebrations take over the next few weeks, you enjoy them in the warm, loving company of good friends and family.

Thank you for all your support through 2017, be that lecture attendance, discussion contributions or just regular attention to this newsletter. It’s all appreciated.

See you in January 2018!


Dave

(and the whole CLG Steering Group)


03-12-17

At the end of a week which saw the first signs of ice appear in gardens and on cars across the country in the early hours, and relations between British Prime Minister, Theresa May and United States President, Donald Trump turned frosty after he retweeted videos posted by a British far-right group, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.



Last week…

Last Wednesday, Moujan Mirdamadi, PhD Student with the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University presented her Lunchtime Lecture ‘How Culture Shapes Depression: An Iranian Case Study’.

In this fascinating lecture, Moujan illuminated the cultural difference in attitudes to sorrow and sadness between that which we are familiar with in the UK, and those in Iran. She explained how sorrow and sadness is seen to have a place in Iranian culture as an appropriate response to the badness contained in the world. We then went to look at the relationship between sadness and depression. Where the two meet and where they depart. We also looked at the response to depression in terms of cultural acceptance/ non-acceptance and then went on to look at the possible solutions on offer, social, cultural and medicinal. Some being quite similar to the Western/European solutions on offer, some being quite different.

This was an interesting lecture on a number of levels. We were able to look at the phenomena of depression in itself, its relationship to general sadness, its cultural significance and attitudes towards it. We were able to understand how depression is articulated across two cultures and how cultural values and belief systems affect its manifestation.

Moujan then kindly stayed with us for the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees were able to further discuss the fascinating themes introduced in the lecture. We could clearly see that Moujan’s PhD is an interesting and worthwhile endeavour. We wish her the best and look forward to hearing from her further down the line as she moves through her doctorate.

I will be posting the lecture part of the day online over the coming weeks:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



This week…

This coming Wednesday (6th December 2017) Dan Degerman, PhD Student with the Department of Politics, Philosophy & Religion at Lancaster University, will present his Lunchtime Lecture, 'Brexit Anxiety: A case study in the medicalization of dissent'

Immediately after the EU referendum, people were reportedly flooding psychiatric clinics to receive care for their Brexit-related emotional suffering. Mental health experts dubbed this suffering ‘Brexit anxiety’, and warned that the anger, fear, and sadness that many people felt – especially those who had voted Remain – were incipient symptoms of mental disorder. This talk will examine the use of Brexit anxiety and other ideas of mental disorder in the aftermath of the referendum, and consider how this affected some citizens’ capacity to participate in the political debate.

Dan Degerman is a PhD student in political philosophy and Society & Ethics Wellcome scholar at Lancaster University. His doctoral research investigates the political relevance of mental suffering. In 2014, he earned an MA in political and legal theory from the University of York, graduating at the top of his class and earning the award for best political philosophy dissertation. Between 2011 and 2012, he was a Researcher-in-Residence at the Center for Neurotechnology Studies at the Potomac Institute for in Arlington, Virginia, exploring the ethical, legal and social implications of human enhancement.

Dan’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get plenty of chance to further discuss the points and themes raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.



26-11-17

At the end of a week when criminal, cult leader Charles Manson died in prison and American President Donald Trump's unfounded claim that he rejected a request for an interview and photo shoot ahead of its ‘Person of the Year’ issue was exposed by Time Magazine, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Dr Susie Balderston, Research Fellow at Lancaster University, visited us to present her Lunchtime Lecture 'Changing the Laws for Assisted Dying?: Ethics, Evidence and Mental Health'.

In this lecture Susie began by acknowledging what a difficult area of debate this is and how the media, at best, adds little of real value and, at worst, clouds the issue further. Susie then went on to look at the historic status of euthanasia and our personal feelings regarding capital punishment, abolished in Great Britain in 1965 and in Northern Ireland in 1973.

We looked at the treatment of minorities during WWII, with particular focus on attitudes to disabled people at that time. We moved on to legislation around the right to life, and noted how the right to death is absent from the legislation.

Susie then progressed to look at the issue from a disability rights perspective and explored the fear among many disabled people, particularly severely disabled people, that their lives would be adversely affected by a change in the current laws. Susie spoke of the feelings of being a burden, which many older people experience, and the effect a change in the laws would have in relation to these.

Moving on, we looked at the current political climate, the move towards ‘saving money’ and the effect that has on societal wellbeing as a whole.

We also looked at one’s feelings when one is faced with a devastating life crisis of some description, and how those feelings are subject to change over time with adequate resources (mental health support, appropriate pain relief, medical treatment, general support etc.) and we agreed that the ‘I-can’t-cope’ moment is a very dangerous moment in any person’s life. We agreed the true importance of adequate resources cannot be underestimated.

Lastly, Susie spoke about the importance of completing an adequate Advance Directive and the need to update that regularly so that it reflects both one’s current state of health, and one’s feelings about the future. Everyone’s feeling change over time and a regularly updated Advance Directive allows us to state our wishes clearly, in light of our health as it currently stands.


This week…

This coming Wednesday 29th November 2017 - Moujan Mirdamadi, PhD Student with the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion at Lancaster University will present her Lunchtime Lecture ‘How Culture Shapes Depression: An Iranian Case Study’.

‘Psychiatric diagnoses assume the universality of symptoms and manifestations of depression. Yet culture has an undeniable effect on articulations and manifestations of depression, as well as the attitudes and responses patients take towards the illness. This talk explores some of the ways experiences of depression in Iran are shaped by cultural values and belief systems.’

Moujan’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees can further discuss themes introduced in the lecture.





19-11-17

At the end of a week when British Prime Minister Theresa May accused Russian President Vladimir Putin of ‘cyberespionage and disruption’, and British high street bakers Greggs apologised for swapping Jesus for a sausage roll in a promotional image for its advent calendar, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday Professor Tony Gatrell of the Faculty of Health and Medicine at Lancaster University presented his lunchtime Lecture, 'We’re Quite Outgoing People - Therapeutic Mobilities & Ageing'.

Tony, a geographer by training with research interests in the geography of health and ‘medical geography’ drew on some recent research that considers ‘getting about’ in later life. He focused particularly on environmental context, social connections, enablement and disruption, referencing a number of works including the ‘Men in Sheds’ project and also work by the late British sociologist professor at Lancaster University, John Urry. Tony offered group members the chance to think about ‘mobilities’ in a wider context opening up possibilities and enabling us to look at the connections between space, place and health.

I will post the lecture in audio format on the website over the coming weeks:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

This week…

This coming Wednesday (22nd November 2017) Dr Susie Balderston, Senior Research Fellow at Lancaster University, will present her Lunchtime Lecture 'Changing the Laws for Assisted Dying?: Ethics, Evidence and Mental Health'.

Susie is a Research Fellow in social policy and criminology (violence against women). She specialises in tackling social inequalities, ethics and human rights, particularly with regard to disability, violence against women and safeguarding (statutory and voluntary sectors).

Susie gained her Ph.D. from Lancaster University Law School; it was the first Doctorate concerned with interventions with victims and Survivors of disablist hate crime and rape. She is Policy Director of a social enterprise of disabled people in Tyne and Wear (which she co-founded in 2003) and has conducted user-led policy development, training and evaluation in health and social care with the Department of Health, 32 local authorities, NHS Trusts and Police Forces in the last ten years.

Susie has served as an advisor to the Equality and Human Rights Commission Statutory Inquiry into Disability Harassment, EU Daphne four country research project with disabled women after violence and NIHR Barriers and Discrimination in Healthcare research. She was a lecturer in Social Policy at University of Salford for two and a half years until February 2017. She is also currently a Research Fellow at the University of Birmingham.

In this lecture, Susie will look at the controversial, and topical area of the laws around assisted dying.

Susie’s lecture will be followed the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get plenty of chance to further explore the issues raised during the lecture.

Other news…

Morecambe Parish Church will be running its annual Christmas Tree Festival on the 7th, 8th and 9th of December. A tree display will be held in the church with a craft fair taking place in the War Memorial Hall. There is also a café with refreshments, mulled wine, live music and much more.


This is a beautiful festival of light and colour that provides an exceptional start to the Christmas celebrations. There’s plenty for the whole family to enjoy and a chance to buy some handmade Christmas presents from small, independent artisan traders.

The uniquely decorated trees on display are created by local groups and there’s plenty of information provided about each group in case you might want to get involved. If you look closely you may even see an attractive little CLG tree, expertly created and presented by Steering Group member, Rita.

The event runs 3pm till 8pm on Thursday and Friday and then 10:30am till 5:30pm on Saturday.
Admission is £1 per adult and accompanied children are free.

The venue is Morecambe Parish Church, Church Street, Morecambe, LA4 5PZ.


12-11-17

At the end of a week which has highlighted the true extent of the arcane schemes used by the world’s wealthiest individuals, corporations, heads of state, technology giants and government officials to avoid making any meaningful financial contribution to society, whilst we simultaneously remember those who laid down their lives so that we may all have a better future, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday we paid a visit to the Lancaster University Ruskin Library and Exhibition Centre for a guided tour of the current exhibition, 'On Home Ground: Ruskin in England and Scotland'. Our guide was acting curator, Rebecca Patterson.

In this exhibition, the viewer is presented with some of Ruskin’s very earliest drawings made in Kent when only twelve. We were introduced to examples from early tours to Scotland and the Lake District in 1837 and 1838, pieces from Ruskin’s student days at Oxford and later occasional travels as well as those made in and around Brantwood, his house at Coniston, after he settled there in 1872.

This was an interesting departure from the pieces we are rather more familiar with, the work that has come to define Ruskin and his life and travels. Namely, the continental drawings and in particular the work he produced on the subject of the architecture of Venice. Attendees were struck by the quality of the drawings Ruskin produced, even from an early age, in particular the beautiful detailed map of Scotland Ruskin created around the age of nine. Rebecca was a very warm and welcoming guide who was able to answer questions and explore the angles of enquiry which the attendees presented. I would like to thank her for an excellent guided visit full of thought-provoking facts and points of interests.

This week…

This coming Wednesday (15th November 2017), Professor Tony Gatrell of the Faculty of Health and Medicine at Lancaster University will present his lunchtime Lecture, 'We’re Quite Outgoing People - Therapeutic Mobilities & Ageing'.

‘Tony is a geographer by training and his research interests lie in the geography of health and ‘medical geography’. In brief, this means looking at the connections between space, place and health. More specifically, Tony has interests in: the geographical dimensions of health inequalities; spatial epidemiology; and the geography of health care provision. More recently he has become interested in the links between movement and health, including walking and well-being. Some of this work has been summarised in his latest book, on ‘Mobilities and Health’ (Ashgate, 2011). Tony has collaborated with many health professionals in the past, including those working in: palliative care; public health; neurology; cardiology; and paediatrics.’

In this lecture Tony will draw on some recent research that considers ‘getting about’ in later life. He will talk less about the health benefits, which are generally well-known, and more about environmental context, social connections, enablement and disruption.

Tony’s lecture will be followed the Research & Discussion Forum. During this part of the afternoon there will be a lively discussion inspired by the content of the lecture.

For more information on the other lectures taking place this term, please visit this area of the website:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures


05-11-17

At the end of a week which has seen Lancaster illuminated with art, theatre and music, enhanced by the beauty of light and colour in the Light-Up-Lancaster Festival, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Dr Joanna Taylor, Senior Research Associate with the Department of History at Lancaster University presented her Lunchtime Lecture 'The Romantic Lake District’s Soundscape'.

In the lecture, Joanna explored the representation of sound in Romantic-era Lake District literature to reveal the ways in which sound was used to understand place in this period. She explored instances of sound as they appear in the works of the Lakeland Poets. We were able see clearly how certain sonic aspects were highlighted as poetic (sheep, waterfalls, hunting horns), whilst other aspects were played down or omitted altogether (industrial sonic emissions etc). We looked at the juxtaposition for those visiting the Lakelands in the romantic era, between the mainstay sounds of the grubby, crowded towns and cities relative to the rolling green hills and mountains of Cumbria, and we explored the specific geology and topography of the area and how that was highlighted at the time with the use of loud canon fire.

This was an exciting lecture which opened up before us, engaging our imagination and illuminating the works of some of the greatest writers of our part of the world. I hope to post the audio recording of the lecture further down the line, after a publication of the research work has been widely released.

However, there are plenty more lectures available to listen to right now on our main website, The Senior Learners Forum:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


This week…

This coming Wednesday (8th November 2017) we will visit to the Lancaster University Ruskin Library and Exhibition Centre current exhibition, 'On Home Ground: Ruskin in England and Scotland'.

Those of you who have attended in the past will know that we try to take in all of the exhibitions at the Ruskin as they are generally excellent. Following the recent retirement of Professor Stephen Wildman, we will be hosted by acting curator, Rebecca Patterson.

‘The depictions of French cathedrals, Venetian palaces and the Swiss Alps by John Ruskin (1819-1900) are rightly admired, but he also produced drawings and watercolours on home ground in England and Scotland. This display includes some of his very earliest drawings made in Kent when only twelve; examples from early tours to Scotland and the Lake District in 1837 and 1838; others from his student days at Oxford and later occasional travels; and those made in and around Brantwood, his house at Coniston, after he settled there in 1872.’

More information about the Ruskin Centre can be found here:
http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/users/ruskinlib/Pages/welcome.html

We will meet at the Ruskin Library (the white oval building on the campus roundabout) in the run up to 1pm.


Other news…

Our good friend and Steering Group member, Janet, had her second hip replacement operation on Friday. She is currently recovering in hospital. I spoke with her this morning and she is in good spirits. I’m sure I speak for us all in saying we wish her a speedy recovery and look forward to seeing her back with the group soon. Best wishes Janet!







29-10-17

At the end of a week which saw publication of plans by Secretary of State for Health, Jeremy Hunt to launch a pilot scheme that would see NHS patients billeted in strangers’ homes to tackle chronic hospital bed shortages, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Dr Emma Halliday, Senior Research Fellow with Health Research at Lancaster University presented her Lunchtime Lecture 'Health Inequalities-What are they? What causes them? Who is affected? What can be done to reduce the gap?'

In this lunchtime lecture, Emma Halliday spoke about the health inequalities that persist in the UK and the types of actions needed to tackle them. She explored specifically how initiatives aiming to empower communities to have greater control over decisions that affect them, have the potential to improve health and help reduce the gap in health between more and less affluent parts of the country. The lecture drew upon recently completed research funded by the NIHR School for Public Health Research.

Emma’s lecture was followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees.

More information about this term’s programme of lectures can be found here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

This week…


This coming Wednesday, 1st November 2017, Dr Joanna Taylor, Senior Research Associate with the Department of History at Lancaster University, will present her Lunchtime Lecture 'The Romantic Lake District’s Soundscape'.


Joanna’s lecture will explore the representation of sound in Romantic-era Lake District literature to reveal the ways in which sound was used to understand place in this period. It will suggest that making noises offered an important means of finding a connection between the self and the landscape that might help us re-consider the way that we respond to the world around us.


Joanna’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will get the chance to discuss issues around sound and understanding.


The lecture will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 at 1pm, followed by the Research & Discussion Forum after a refreshment break, around 2:45pm


Other news…

Here is some information about another upcoming public lecture taking place on campus…

What might Social and Health Care look like in 2025?
Wednesday 8th November 2017
6.30pm - 8pm. Doors at 6pm
LICA Building, Lancaster University, LA1 4YD

Format of the event will be a keynote talk and panel discussion, with opportunities for Q&A. Complimentary refreshments will be served before and after the lecture.

Government predictions suggest that the number of people aged over 75 will rise 35% by 2025. Many people will remain healthy and independent as they get older, but an increased number will need additional support at a time when the country as a whole is struggling to meet the existing needs of the population. Funding, resources and ways of working have become important political, social and health challenges.

A keynote talk from Professor David Croisdale-Appleby OBE will set the scene before a panel discussion asks the question: what will public and professional health and social care look like less than 10 years from now, and what new solutions are required?

About the panel…

Professor David Croisdale-Appleby OBE has extensive experience of working to improve the lives of disadvantaged and vulnerable people and is committed to ensuring the better treatment and care of people with dementia. He is Chairman of Skills for Care, Skills for Care and Development and Dementia UK.

Professor Heather Tierney-Moore OBE joined the Lancashire Care NHS Trust in 2009 following a career in nursing. Now Chief Executive, she plays a key leadership role across Lancashire and the North West.

Professor Christine Milligan is the Director of the Centre for Ageing Research at Lancaster University. Her research focuses on voluntary and community interventions to support active and healthy ageing, informal and family care-giving, the role of technology in supporting older people and the changing nature of home and community.

Professor Corinne May-Chahal's research focuses on keeping children and vulnerable adults safe. She has worked to formulate policy on interviewing child witnesses in criminal proceedings and to develop software which recognises ages and genders in online communications. She has also undertaken research into gambling and crime and self-neglect in older people.

Stephen Sloss is the Chief Executive of Salvere Social Enterprise CIC, which seeks to provide personalised health and social support to anyone who needs it. Before setting up Salvere, Stephen was the Director of Social Services and Adult Social Care at Blackburn with Darwen Council.

You can book your place by calling 01524 592190.

Thanks for your attention, have a good week,



22-10-17

At the end of a week which saw Oxford and Cambridge universities accused of practicing “social apartheid” with nearly one in three Oxford colleges, and one in five Cambridge colleges, apparently failing to admit even one black, British A-level student in 2015, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday Marion McClintock, Honorary Archivist & Honorary Fellow at Lancaster University, presented her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Caring for the University's Heritage'.

Marion McClintock has worked for the whole of her professional life in higher education, including more than forty years at Lancaster, where she was Academic Registrar from 1994 to 2006.
In her lecture, Marion discussed the history of the University from its conception, with a small group of academics and a member of Lancashire County Council, through to its present position as a world leading university, occupying a top ten place in the UK tables and recently named ‘University of the Year’ by The Times and The Sunday Times Good University Guide 2018.

Marion has published a number of books. Notable works include:
Shaping the Future: A History of the University of Lancaster 1961-2011
&
Quest for Innovation: History of the First Ten Years of Lancaster University

Both are available from good bookshops and from Amazon.co.uk.

This week…

This coming Wednesday (25th October 2017) Dr Emma Halliday, Senior Research Fellow with Health Research at Lancaster University will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Health Inequalities-What are they? What causes them? Who is affected? What can be done to reduce the gap?'

In this lunchtime lecture, Emma Halliday will talk about the health inequalities that persist in the UK and the types of actions needed to tackle this. She will explore specifically how initiatives aiming to empower communities to have greater control over decisions that affect them, have the potential to improve health and help reduce the gap in health between more and less affluent parts of the country. The lecture will draw upon recently completed research funded by the NIHR School for Public Health Research.

Emma is a Senior Research Fellow working on a programme of research funded by the NIHR School for Public Health Research. Current projects include:
The Communities in Control Study - An evaluation of the health impact of the place based initiative - Big Local - being rolled out in 150 areas in England.
Evaluating the Health Inequalities Impact of Reducing the Cost of Local Authority Leisure Facilities - funded by the NIHR SPHR Public Health Evaluation Practice Scheme.

Between 2010-2013, Emma worked on a research programme evaluating the health impact of one of England's largest area based initiatives - New Deal for Communities.
Prior to joining Lancaster University, Emma gained a doctorate in history in 2003 and worked in mental health research roles within the public and not for profit sectors.

Emma’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where group members can further explore issues raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.


16-10-17

As Storm Ophelia approaches wearing a stunningly beautiful robe of golden light, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Well, we had a great start to the new term last week when Dr Brian Hodgson kicked off the new term with his lecture on the exciting new theme of the philosophy of materials.

In his lecture Brian spoke of three views of the world’s fabrics. The mythological world, consisting of a number of elements including the underworld, earth and the heavens. Ruskin’s moral world, consisting of elements such as truth, beauty, obedience. And finally the material world, consisting of strength, durability, affordability amongst others. With these three distinct historical world views, Brian was immediately able to start us out on a thought journey which took account of the metaphysical, the historical, the contextual and the practical in terms of buildings, their materials and their evolution. We were able to grasp the scope of the subject and the true potential contained therein. Brian certainly seems to be at the start of another highly worthwhile journey of discovery. His enthusiasm is infectious and we look forward to hearing how his adventure into this fascinating new area of philosophy progresses.

We followed Brian’s lecture with a Research & Discussion Forum focused on building philosophies that interest us all, the ecological, the religious, the revolutionary. Many thanks to Brian for getting us all fired up with ideas and enthusiasm right at the start of term.

I will post the audio recording of the lecture online later in the week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


This week…

This coming Wednesday (18th October 2017) Marion McClintock, honorary archivist and honorary fellow at Lancaster University will present her lecture 'Caring for the University's Heritage'.

Marion McClintock, MBE, BA, is a very familiar face to many of us around campus, and can often be seen around Alexandra Square and the University Library. Marion has worked for the whole of her professional life in higher education, including more than forty years at Lancaster, where she was Academic Registrar from 1994 to 2006. She is currently Honorary Archivist and Honorary Fellow of the University, as well as pursuing historical and related pursuits in Lancashire and Cumbria.

In this lecture, Marion talks about the University’s historical records; their content, conservation and significance and for the future.

Following on from the lecture, in the Research & Discussion Forum, we will discuss the value of the University, the changes we have witnessed and our hopes for the future.

Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.


Other news…


Are you aged 60 or above, identify as lesbian, gay or bisexual, and interested in taking part in a research study?

This study aims to explore the experiences of older lesbian, gay and bisexual adults in relation to expressing their sexuality across their life time and the impact this may have on loneliness in later life.

If you feel you would like to participate in this PhD study, please contact Amelia Bell of the Department of Health and Medicine at Lancaster University.
Tel: 077227431285
Email: studyphdbell@yahoo.co.uk


Thanks for your attention.
Have a good week and let’s hope Storm Ophelia is kind to us all.




08-10-17

Hello,

I Hope this email finds you well and rested after a nice, long summer break.

We have an exciting academic year ahead filled with wonderful lectures in such diverse subject areas as philosophy, history, ethics and health. All good stuff.

Our new term begins on Wednesday 11th October with a Lunchtime Lecture by Dr Brian Hodgson, formerly of Lancaster University Ruskin Centre and a valued member of the CLG, entitled 'Material Choices in the Built Environment'.

Brian is embarking on an exciting new journey of research into ‘the philosophy of materials’. On this subject Brian writes…

‘In the philosophy of materials a system is needed to recognise and define how materials are chosen for buildings and fittings and furniture used in those buildings. Schools of architecture (Metaphorical schools not actual ones), and design, list various criteria. These criteria are often artistic-design orientated using what Ruskin once described as probity of style instead of probity of materials.

Most of the historical definitions of architecture are style or outward appearance based. W.R. Lethaby in his writings on architecture and furniture makes some very interesting observations; for instance, in ‘Architecture, Mysticism and Myth’ he talks about the necessities imposed by materials... and the physical laws in their combination. This is one of the main stays of the Philosophy.

The other is the rather esoteric understanding of the buildings of the ancient civilizations which echoed their builder's understanding of the world and its creation. I do not yet see how these, apparently very different, themes can be unified, but it will be one of the defining tenets of the philosophy. If this is not clear, be assured it still is not clear to me, you will see in the lecture some tentative steps taken to make sense of it all.’

This promises to be a truly fascinating lecture to begin the new academic year, as Brian invites us to walk with him into a new area of study, a largely unexplored area of philosophy.

Brian’s lecture will then be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will have plenty of chance to look closer at the content of the lecture and discuss in detail, this inspiring arena of discovery.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

You can take a look at the other lectures planned for this term by visiting our main website, the Senior Learners Forum via this link:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

If you missed any of our lectures last year, you can also listen to them on the website too:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

I hope you are able to join us this academic year, as it looks to be very informative with lots of food for thought. Please feel free to bring a friend if you feel they might also enjoy our Lunchtime Lectures.

Best wishes,

Dave and the whole Steering Group.


24-06-17

Hello,

At the end of a week which saw power-cuts around the bay bring our education programme to a (temporary) grinding halt, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday we were all looking forward to hearing our good friend and group member, Jim Ring present an interesting lecture on the economic theories of Greek economist, academic and politician Yanis Varoufakis. However, the agenda was thrown into chaos when a wide scale (60,000 homes) power cut struck the whole of Morecambe Bay, taking out all electricity but for the emergency background safety lighting around the University. This began whilst the Steering Group were meeting, around 11:15, and continued for a couple of hours. Sadly, Jim’s lecture was unable to go ahead at that point.

As an alternative, we took to Fylde Coffee bar and, thanks to Chris who was a week early with her Jacob’s Join preparations, we were able to gather around a large table for a good chat, eat cake and drink lemonade. Thanks Chris, how very fortuitous!




This Week…

Now, this coming Wednesday (28th June 2017) is our least session of this term, and indeed this academic year. We have rescheduled Jim’s lecture for this week, so all is not lost. Here is a little reminder from last week’s CLG News…

‘Examining 'The Global Minotaur' by Yanis Varoufakis'

‘As you know, Jim has been a member of the Continuing Learning Group for many years now attending Lunchtime Lectures regularly and providing valuable contributions to the Research & Discussion Forum. Jim was educated at the London School of Economics and lives in Kendal. He has had a long standing involvement in local and national politics, and is an active political campaigner. We are very pleased to welcome him in his capacity as an educator. In this session, Jim will examine the contents of Yanis Varoufarkis' recent book ‘The Global Minotaur’.

'In this remarkable and provocative book, Yanis Varoufakis explodes the myth that financialisation, ineffectual regulation of banks, greed and globalisation were the root causes of the global economic crisis. Rather, they are symptoms of a much deeper malaise which can be traced all the way back to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a 'Global Minotaur' was born. Just as the Athenians maintained a steady flow of tributes to the Cretan beast, so the 'rest of the world' began sending incredible amounts of capital to America and Wall Street. Thus, the Global Minotaur became the 'engine' that pulled the world economy from the early 1980s to 2008.

Today's crisis in Europe, the heated debates about austerity versus further fiscal stimuli in the US, the clash between China's authorities and the Obama administration on exchange rates are the inevitable symptoms of the weakening Minotaur; of a global 'system' which is now as unsustainable as it is imbalanced. ‘

(taken from https://www.yanisvaroufakis.eu)


We also plan to have our Annual General Meeting, where we can look back at the events of the year and organise ourselves for the coming academic year (2017-2018). Please bring food and drink to share and enjoy the chance to chat with fellow group members.

Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.




Other news…

Here is some information about a ‘Centre for Ageing Research’ event which is taking place during the summer break

'Town and Gown' Event on Dementia and the Imagination: Arts and Design for Health
7th September 2017 - Banqueting Room, Lancaster Town Hall (9:30am - 4:30pm)

With the numbers of people with dementia rising and the costs of care spiraling, dementia remains a challenge that the UK cannot overlook. Tackling dementia is now a priority for the NHS. This includes helping people and their carers live well with dementia after diagnosis. Dementia can have a devastating effect on people’s cognitive abilities and with no ‘cure’ on the immediate horizon, there is a real need to think more innovatively about how we can best support individuals and families currently living with dementia in ways that will actively enhance their sense of self and identity and contribute to an improved quality of life. Interestingly, the creative, imaginative and emotional parts of a person often remain relatively strong. Arts and design may thus have an important role to play here – one that is often overlooked in the race for more effective clinical and biomedical interventions.

This year’s Town and Gown event run by Lancaster University Centre for Ageing Research is designed to bring to you some of the most cutting edge research and practice that draws on knowledge and expertise from the worlds of arts and design. From music and theatre to participatory art and design, this event showcases the work of researchers from the university together with that of their collaborators from the health, the voluntary and community sector and academia.
The event will consist of a mix of talks from invited guest speakers who are experts in this field and who will draw on some of their latest research to talk about these issues. These talks will be interspersed with short 10 minute presentations from a range of researchers from Lancaster in order to showcase their work around dementia, the arts and design as well as short films, exhibitions, posters and other interactive events.

Though the event will be of interest to other academics, the event is primarily aimed at members of the public, practitioners from health and social care, and the worlds of arts and design.

Attendance at this one day event is free but places are limited, so you MUST register for a place at this event.

To reserve your place to attend please e-mail Jan Lyons at: c4ar@lancaster.ac.uk
Alternatively you can telephone Jan on: 01524 593309




Regarding George…

As you know, it was our dear friend and fellow CLG member, George’s funeral last Tuesday. Janet Ross-Mills, Gill Robinson and myself attended. The afternoon started with an intimate ceremony of reminiscence and silent reflection, the preferred Quaker way of remembering a departed friend. This took place at the new Crematorium at Beetham, just up the road from Lancaster. Family and friends attended, including George’s three sons who live in Australia, New Zealand and the UK.
Following the cremation ceremony, friends and family then travelled on to the beautiful Brigflatts Early Quaker Meeting House, near Sedbergh in Cumbria, a place where George spent a lot of time. Another session of reminiscence and silence took place in the meeting house, with those attendees who felt moved to speak taking turns to share their thoughts and feelings with those present. There were also periods of silence to reflect. We were all able to learn more about George, and had the chance to thank him for his valued friendship and companionship. Janet kindly spoke on behalf of the CLG and Fiona (our programme founder).
Tea, coffee, biscuits and cake were served in the attractive cottage-style garden outside the meeting house, and the sun shone brightly in George’s honour. All in all it was a lovely day, and I know George would have been extremely delighted with the events.
And finally…
So, we have made it to the end of the term… and the academic year. It has been a wonderful year, full of great learning opportunities. We have said goodbye to a friend (George Henson) and welcomed another (Benjamin Simon Daly). We begin our brand new term on October 11th 2017. We currently have a fine range of lectures in the pipeline covering such diverse areas as the Aurora Borealis and The Human Genome Project. We hope you will join us for the journey.
With best wishes,
Dave and the whole Steering Group


17-06-17

At the end of a week where many questions have been asked around the current laws concerning habitation standards of rented accommodation following a tragic inferno in a London tower block, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.



Last week…

Last Wednesday we were visited by Stephen Wildman, director of the Ruskin Library and Research Centre. Stephen is about to retire from his post, so we asked him if he would visit us one last time in his current position to speak with us about his time working with the Ruskin Centre and, in particular, his long standing relationship with Ruskin's work. This was a very interesting talk indeed. We heard about the different phases of Stephen’s life, including his time at Cambridge University and his interest in the art of the Pre-Raphaelites, which preceded his interest in the (artistic and theoretical) work of John Ruskin. It was great to see how Stephen’s interest in Ruskin’s life and work grew steadily over time. We were able to appreciate how Stephen, through a thorough knowledge of his subject, has developed a fully rounded understanding of the driving forces in Ruskin’s life, his visual, artistic output and its relationship to his theories, which ranged from the personal to the political, with particular concern with the aesthetic. We would like to thank Stephen for his valuable support and we look forward to working with him again in the future.


If you would like to more about the life and work of John Ruskin, you can visit the website (link below), or better still why not visit the Centre itself? The current exhibition, 'Coming of Age': Ruskin’s Drawings from the 1840-41 Tour, runs from 24 April – 1 September 2017.

http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/users/ruskinlib/Pages/1840.html




This week…

This coming week (21st June 2017) Jim Ring, CLG Group Member.
'Examining 'The Global Minotaur' by Yanis Varoufakis'

You will all know Jim as he has been a member of the Continuing Learning Group for many years now attending Lunchtime Lectures regularly and providing valuable contributions to the Research & Discussion Forum. Jim was educated at the London School of Economics and lives in Kendal. He has had a long standing involvement in local and national politics, and is an active political campaigner. We are very pleased to welcome him in his capacity as an educator. In this session, Jim will examine the contents of Yanis Varoufarkis' recent book ‘The Global Minotaur’.

'In this remarkable and provocative book, Yanis Varoufakis explodes the myth that financialisation, ineffectual regulation of banks, greed and globalisation were the root causes of the global economic crisis. Rather, they are symptoms of a much deeper malaise which can be traced all the way back to the Great Crash of 1929, then on through to the 1970s: the time when a 'Global Minotaur' was born. Just as the Athenians maintained a steady flow of tributes to the Cretan beast, so the 'rest of the world' began sending incredible amounts of capital to America and Wall Street. Thus, the Global Minotaur became the 'engine' that pulled the world economy from the early 1980s to 2008.

Today's crisis in Europe, the heated debates about austerity versus further fiscal stimuli in the US, the clash between China's authorities and the Obama administration on exchange rates are the inevitable symptoms of the weakening Minotaur; of a global 'system' which is now as unsustainable as it is imbalanced. ‘

(taken from https://www.yanisvaroufakis.eu)

Jim’s Lunchtime Lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum. This part of the afternoon will give all group members the chance to examine the ideas proposed by Varoufakis and put forward by Jim.

Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.
We look forward to your company.




And finally…

The Cremation of our good friend George Henson will take place at Beetham Hall Crematorium at 3.30 pm on Tuesday 20th June followed by a Quaker Meeting to celebrate George’s life at Brigflatts Quaker Meeting House, Sedbergh at 5.00 pm

For those not familiar with Quaker affairs it may be helpful to understand that in the ceremony people sit in silence, but in due course people can make a spoken address about George if they wish.

Tea, coffee and light refreshments will be provided at Brigflatts. The funeral director is J. J. Martin 015396 25334

Directions to Brigflatts: From junction 37 on the M6 turn right for Sedbergh A684. On the outskirts of Sedbergh just before the first garage, turn right A683 (signed to Kirkby Lonsdale) and Brigflatts is approx 250 yards. Park on the right and walk down the short road opposite to the Meeting House.





10-06-17

At the end of a truly fascinating election week, where both main parties celebrated like winners and the political landscape changed drastically, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Dr Amin-Al-Astewani, Lecturer in Law at Lancaster Law School presented his Lunchtime Lecture 'English Human Rights Law and the Use of Religious Symbols'.

Amin reflected upon the significance of four important cases that have arisen over the last decade in the English courts which relate to the use of religious symbols:

R v Denbigh High School (2006) in which the English courts considered a Muslim pupil’s right to wear Islamic dress at school.

R v Governing Body of Millais School (2007) in which the English courts considered a Christian pupil’s right to wear a purity ring at school.

R v Governing Body of Aberdare Girl’s High School (2008) in which the English courts considered a Sikh pupil’s right to wear a Kara bangle at school.

Eweida v British Airways plc (2010) in which English (and eventually European) courts considered a Christian employee’s right to wear a cross at work.

Amin presented these example cases in the context of relevant human rights and equality legislations, which, in turn, clarified for the group the subtle nuances of law which come into play in such cases. This was a very interesting lecture which explained how seemingly similar cases can have quite different outcomes in practice.

We then followed on from the lecture with a good Research & Discussion Forum, where Amin took part, answering further questions on the fine points of this fascinating area of law.

I will be posting the audio recording of the lecture part of the afternoon online soon:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



This week…

This coming Wednesday (14th June 2017) Professor Stephen Wildman, Director of the Ruskin Library and Research Centre at Lancaster University will present us with a talk, 'Ruskin & I'.


Many of you will now know Stephen from previous lectures he has given to the group and also from his guided tours of exhibitions at the Ruskin Library. Stephen is about to retire from his post, so we asked him if he would visit us one last time in his current position to speak with us about his time working with the Ruskin Centre and his long standing relationship with Ruskin's work.

We are very grateful for the support Stephen has given us over the last ten, or so, years and wish him well as he embarks on the next exciting phase of his life.

Stephen’s talk will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will have plenty of chance to discuss issues raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.



And finally…

It is with great sadness I must report the death of our dear friend, George Henson, who died on Monday 5th June 2017.

George was a founder member of the Continuing Learning Group and previously took part in the Senior Learners Programme run by the Department of Continuing Education at Lancaster University.

As you may know, George served as a pilot during WW2 and flew Mosquito planes in Burma. Thanks to George’s skills, a design fault in the planes was discovered and the lives of many of his fellow pilots saved. He had a career as an engineer after the war, and enjoyed sailing off the North West coast with his wife and 3 sons for many years.

In later years George shared his interests in Quakerism and sailing with his friend Anne Kilshaw and they both spent the Saturday before he died at Glasson Dock, working together on their boats.

George lived contentedly in Nazareth House for about 2 years following a fall, and regularly attended lectures, committee meetings and took part in recent research projects for the Department of Health Studies.

A fine man, with a wealth of knowledge and experience, George will be very much missed by all of us.

If you would like to hear an audio interview conducted a few years ago with George on the subject of 'Learning Methods' in which George told us a little about his life. You can do so here:
http://dai.ly/xwwgws



03-06-17

As we race at great speed towards the forthcoming United Kingdom general election, which takes place this coming Thursday 8th June, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.



Last week…

Last Wednesday Dr Samuele Carcagno, Senior Research Associate with the Department of Psychology here at Lancaster University presented his two part Lunchtime Lecture on
'Wood Choice for Acoustic Guitars & Hearing and Ageing'.

Firstly, Samuele focused on a piece of research he has been involved with. The research study looked at the difference between various tropical hardwoods used for the back plates of acoustic guitars, highly prized by guitarists not only for their beauty but also for their purported sound qualities. These materials are not only expensive, but also endangered due to deforestation. In the study, experienced guitarists rated the sound qualities of six steel-string acoustic guitars with back plates made of different woods varying widely in monetary value, prestige, and sustainability. These were then compared and rated in terms of preference and also using audio spectrum technology so give a clear understanding of the performance of each material.

The second part of the lecture was given over to an exploration of hearing, how it works in practice, and how these functions become impaired with age. We were able to grasp the difference between natural ageing and hearing damage due to excessive loud noise. Samuele also discussed the issues which we need to tackle if we are to develop high quality hearing improvement surgery. Samuele is currently involved in a piece of hearing and ageing research. If you would like to get involved, or just find out more, you can contact Samuele here:

Hearing Lab at Lancaster University
Room D40,
Fylde College,
Lancaster,
LA1 4YF
Tel: 01524 594305
s.carcagno@lancaster.ac.uk

Or visit the website: www.psych.lancs.ac.uk/hearing


We followed the lecture with a vibrant Research & Discussion Forum where ideas and issues raised in the lecture where further discussed.

I will be posting an audio version of the lecture online here soon:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures






This week…

This coming Wednesday (7th June 2017) Dr Amin-Al-Astewani, Lecturer in Law at Lancaster Law School here at Lancaster University, will present his lecture 'The Law Around Religious Symbols'.

Dr Amin-Al-Astewani gained his International Baccalaureate at Manchester Grammar School before going on to gain his Bachelor's Degree in Law at the University of Manchester. His PhD in Law was also gained at the University of Manchester. He was Senior Editor at the University of Manchester Review of Law, Crime and Ethics, 2013-2014 and Research Officer at the Manchester Centre for Regulation and Governance from 2016. His general areas of research interest focus around religion and law and also public law. In this lecture he will explore the topical area of law around religious symbols which has become a talking point in recent years.

We will follow on from the lecture with the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will be able to chat about thoughts, ideas and issues raised in the lecture.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture theatre 3 from 1pm.


Other news…

Whilst we are on the subject of research, I would like to remind you of some ongoing research which you might want to get involved with…

‘Healthy adult volunteers aged 55 and over are needed for a study of eye movement as an early indicator of impairment in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers at Lancaster University and the Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust are conducting a study to investigate eye movements as a possible way to help diagnose Alzheimer’s disease. We would like to record eye movements and performance on the cognitive tests to see if they might be useful in the future as an aid to diagnosis. To complete this study we will need to include a group of people who do not have Alzheimer’s disease as a comparison group. An infra-red eye-tracking camera will be used to record your eye movements while you are looking at the lights. You will also be asked to complete some tests of your memory and attention. This will involve a series of simple questions that will help to provide more information to help us identify whether the eye movements are related to other functions of the brain. You will not be paid or compensated for your participation. However, we will be able to contribute towards travel costs.’

If you would like to be considered as control participant please contact by telephone or email:

Dr. Trevor Crawford: 01524 593761 email: t.crawford@lancaster.ac.uk


Thanks, have a good week and don’t forget to vote!






27-05-17

At the end of a difficult week which saw Britain shaken to the core after a suicide bomber detonated a device at a concert in central Manchester killing 23 people and injuring 116, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Professor Alisdair Gillespie of Lancaster Law School here at Lancaster University presented his Lunchtime Lecture on 'Cyber-Crime'.

After first defining the concept of cyber-crime, Professor Gillespie looked at a broad range of features from fraud and theft of funds with individuals and companies, through to child pornography, child grooming and child solicitation. We heard how increasingly, young people in today’s society do not differentiate between online and offline aspects of their lives. This way of experiencing the world is likely to become more engrained as we see the ‘Internet of Things’ (internet linked machines) expand to include more of our household appliances and daily objects.

We looked at data storage, how little awareness we have of it, and how our data is now stored in many places such as our own homes, storage facilities both nationally and internationally. We looked at the full extent of fake, though seemingly genuine, websites designed to draw us in and gain our details. We were made aware of just how careful we need to be online, and the benefits of using established pathways, we set up ourselves, to carry out our daily tasks.

We then went on to discuss a number of other interesting points in the Research & Discussion Forum which followed on from the lecture,

If you would like to hear the lecture, I will be posting it soon here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


This week…


This coming Wednesday (31st May 2017) Dr Samuele Carcagno, Senior Research Associate with the Department of Psychology here at Lancaster University will present his Lunchtime Lecture
'Wood Choice for Acoustic Guitars & Hearing and Ageing'

Samuele will present his lecture in two parts…

Part 1:
The steel-string acoustic guitar is one of the most popular instruments in the world. Certain tropical hardwoods used for the back plates of acoustic guitars, such as Brazilian rosewood, are highly prized by guitarists not only for their beauty but also for their purported sound qualities. Unfortunately, the most prized species of woods used for the back plates of acoustic guitars are not only expensive, but also endangered due to deforestation. In this lecture Samuele will present the results of a study in which experienced guitarists rated the sound qualities of six steel-string acoustic guitars with back plates made of different woods varying widely in monetary value, prestige, and sustainability.

Part 2:
The ability to understand speech in noisy environments declines with increasing age, often leading to communication difficulties and a reduced quality of life. Hearing ability is usually measured in the clinic using “pure tone audiometry” which measures a patient’s ability to hear quiet tones of different frequencies. As we age, there is a reduction in sensitivity, particularly at high frequencies, due to damage to the sensitive “hair cells” in the ear that detect sounds. However, there is increasing evidence that hearing abilities can decline as age increases even in people without audiometric hearing loss and with intact cognitive abilities. This suggests that other factors, such as loss of auditory nerve fibres and/or loss of synchronous firing between nerve fibres may be at play. In this lecture Samuele will present the rationale and methodology of a large-scale study that he’s currently conducting to assess the role that these factors play in the decline of hearing abilities with ageing.

The lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will get the chance to discuss ideas and concepts raised in the lecture.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.




Other news…


Lancaster and Morecambe U3A on behalf of North West Region of U3As are holding a one day conference on Thursday, 26th October 2017.

This ‘Health and Wellbeing Conference’ aims to enthuse, inform and empower participants to lead healthy lives.

The programme will run as follows:

10.00 a.m. - 10.30 a.m. Registration and tea/ coffee.

10.30 a.m. - 10.35 a.m. Welcome to the Conference
Gill Russell - North West Regional Trustee.

10.35 a.m. - 10.40 a.m. Local welcome and introduction to the day
Professor Gill Baynes – Research Ambassador and External Liaison -L&M U3A
Morning session– Chaired by Gill Russell - North West Regional U3A Trustee.

10.40 a.m. - 10.50 a.m. What is Health?
Dr. Alex McMinn, M.B.E. Former NW Trustee U3A and World Health Organisation Advisor.

10.50a.m. - 11.20 a.m. Reducing your Risk of Dementia: The Science Behind the Headlines
Dr. Penny Foulds, Honorary Researcher, Division of Biomedical and Life Sciences, Lancaster
University.

11.20 a.m. - 11.45a.m. Medical Screening to Maintain Health: The Role of Radiology
Professor Gill Baynes, former Chair in Medical Imaging Education, University of Cumbria

11.45 a.m. - 12.10p.m. The Role of Pathological Testing in Health
Alan Currie, Former Directorate Manager Pathology, UHMBT.

12.10 p.m. -12.35 p.m. Non drug treatments to intervene and prevent dementia
Dr Garuth Chalfont, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Lancaster University.

12.35 p.m. -12.45 p.m. Cancercare and its role in promoting Health and Wellbeing
Neil Townsend, Chief Executive Officer, Cancercare.

12.45p.m. - 1.45p.m. Lunch – Ashton Hall.

Afternoon session – Chaired by Neil Stevenson –NW Regional Committee Chair.
1.45p.m. - 2.15 p.m. Keynote Lecture, Voluntary and Community Interventions to Support Active and Healthy Ageing. Professor Christine Milligan, Director for Centre of Ageing, Lancaster University.

2.15 p.m. - 2.40pm Eyetracking as an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease
Dr.Thom Wilcockson, Department of Psychology, Lancaster University.

2.40 p.m. - 3.00p.m. The role of Exercise in Active Ageing.
Lindsey Wilcox, Retired Physiotherapist and committee member of the Morecambe Bay
Branch of National Osteoporosis Society.

3.00 p.m. - 3.20 p.m. The Security Challenges associated with Ageing
Dr. Lara Warmelink, Department of Psychology, Lancaster University.

3.20 p.m. - 3.30 p.m. How the services of Age UK positively impact on Health and Wellbeing
Anne Oliver, Community Engagement Manager, Age UK.

3.30p.m. - 3.50pm Open Forum : Gill Baynes, Alan Currie, Penny Foulds, Anne Oliver, Neil Townsend, Thom Wilcockson.

3.50p.m. -4.00 p.m. Closing remarks: NW Regional U3A Trustee - Gill Russell, Lancaster and Morecambe U3A, University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay Trust.


There will be Marketplace event all day:
Stalls include: Age UK, Alzheimer’s Society, Cancercare, Care Innovation, Continuing Learning Group, Defying Dementia, Dying Matters, Innovation Agency, MAC Clinical Research, National Osteoporosis Society.

Venue :
Ashton Hall
The Town Hall
Dalton Square
Lancaster
LA1 1PJ
01524 582583
Main access - George Street entrance of Town Hall
Disabled access - through main entrance to Town Hall, at the left hand side of the building if standing at the front.

For parking please see https://www.lancaster.gov.uk/parking/car-parks
For Disabled parking please see: https://www.lancaster.gov.uk/parking/disable-parking-bays-in-lancaster

Charitable donations appreciated to Cancercare.



Also…

We recently publicised Lancaster District CVS launch of Lancaster District Academy of Volunteering, which was due to take place on Thursday 1st June 2017, at The Cornerstone. Unfortunately, this event has been postponed for the time being. We don’t as yet know when it will take place, but we will keep you informed.



And finally…

I am very pleased to announce the arrival of Benjamin Simon Daly, to our fabulous Steering Group member Zsuzsanna, and her husband (and good friend of the CLG) Rory. Benjamin was born on Thursday 25th May, weighing 7lbs/3kg. We would like to congratulate them wholeheartedly, and we really look forward to meeting our newest, and youngest, CLG member in due course.
Congratulations Folks! Xxx






21-05-17

At the end of a week that saw around 3,000 lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and straight people march through Lancaster City to celebrate Gay Pride, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.



Last week…

Last Wednesday, Dr. Jack Brettle, Honorary Fellow at Aberystwyth University presented us with a forward looking lecture entitled 'Tomorrow's World'.

Dr. Jack Brettle, whose background is as a materials scientist with a career which covered solid state physics, electrochemistry, surface science, biotechnology and nanotechnology, expertly explained to the group how the smartphone has brought testing and health monitoring to us all at a relatively low cost. We were shown add-on devices which can be used with standard high-street technology in order that we might better understand our health. We were also told how technological health-related data can be communicated to a central source, such as a doctor or specialist, automatically. We were able to see the advantages of such data transfer in terms of monitoring health conditions, but were also struck by the less positive outcomes that might ensue when such personal data is made available. Many of us are familiar with telecare systems for safety monitoring and triggering alarms when problems such as falls occur, however, we were able to see how advancing this technology could have huge implications for the population. Both good and bad.

After the lecture we continued the discussion around health, society, ethics and data management in the Research & Discussion Forum.

If you would like to hear the contents of Jack’s lecture, I will be posting it here soon:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



This week…


This coming Wednesday (24th May 2017) Professor Alisdair Gillespie of Lancaster Law School here at Lancaster University, will present his Lunchtime Lecture 'Cyber-Crime'

Professor Gillespie’s main research interests relate to cyber-crime, particularly in respect of child sexual exploitation. Much of his work relates to child pornography, child grooming and child solicitation but also includes broader forms of cyber-crime. Professor Gillespie also has research interests in legal systems and evidence, particularly covert surveillance. Professor Gillespie has been called to act as an expert advisor to the UN, Council of Europe, EU and prosecutors & the judiciary from around the world. He has also advised the Home Office, Ministry of Justice and Sentencing Council.

Alisdair’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get the chance to further explore issues raised in the lecture.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.



Other news…

Lancaster District CVS would like to invite you to the launch of Lancaster District Academy of Volunteering on Thursday 1st June 2017, at The Cornerstone. The event will be divided into two (identical) sessions (10:00 and 14:00, each for an hour and a half) looking at the concept of volunteering and its benefits. If you would like to attend, please confirm your attendance and preferred session by emailing Ruth: ruthcorrigan@lancastercvs.org.uk or call 01524 555900 no later than Wednesday 24th May 2017.

“Lancaster CVS developed our Academy to provide a central point where people can speak with an advisor, access information technology and find peer support by trained staff and volunteers, 5 days a week between 10:00 and 16:00. We want to provide local people multi agency support (access opportunities; training information; support; mentoring and a dedicated training program) because quite often the people we engage with face a multiple of barriers that prevent them from working or volunteering. Our project provides this vast range of services in an acquired dedicated space secured by Lancaster CVS that is inviting and inspirational for volunteers and volunteer-involving organisations. Our aim is to provide the support needed to build skills, knowledge and confidence so that people can go on to engage in volunteering as a way of improving their wellbeing and re-building their lives.”

This invitation coincides with National Volunteers’ Week, which runs from 1st to 7th June. Volunteers’ week provides an excellent opportunity to let volunteers know just how appreciated they are – contributing to the heart of all that CVS do, and to celebrate the positive difference they make on a day to day basis with organisations across the country. A further coincidence and cause for celebration is the 40th anniversary of Lancaster District CVS, and they would like to thank all for the continued support they receive.

I’m sure, as residents of Lancaster District, we would all like to thank them for their excellent contribution and wish them a very happy 40th anniversary.





14-05-17

At the end of a week which has seen 99 countries hit with a large scale ransomware cyber-attack, including the UK’s National Health Service, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, in conjunction with Lancaster University and the Centre for Ageing Research, the Continuing Learning Group hosted a Dying Matters Awareness Week event at St Paul’s Parish Hall, Scotforth, Lancaster.

Many middle aged and older people are changing their approach to death and dying by seizing the chance to take some control on how they might face end of life issues, making provisional plans, becoming informed on what is available in terms of medical treatment and direction of their finances etc. Where this was often regarded as a taboo area, with many people leaving much of the process to chance or to the whim of those left behind, some people are now beginning to embrace this part of their lives and take steps to have more of a say in their future.

Our event began (after the usual introductions) with a short but inspiring film made by ‘Conversations For Life’ (including some CLG/SLP members) entitled ‘Breaking the Silence’, which looked at death as the last taboo, and why we need to address it. This short film, open, compassionate and frank, highlights a number of important issues, such as the fact that we often take it for granted that our loved ones know what we want in terms of end of life care, though in reality we may never have discussed it with them, or made our wishes known. Personal experiences play a large part in the film and are discussed in a warm and sensitive way. We used this valuable film as a starting block, stimulating discussion for the event.

You can view the short film here:
https://youtu.be/07dx8EvRiL4

Following on from the film, Janet Ross-Mills explained a number of tools we have at our disposal when planning for the future including, Lasting Power of Attorney, Advance Decisions and Advance Statements. There was plenty of questions and discussion around these tools and how we might tailor them to our own needs and requirements.

After a tasty lunch, which was slightly delayed due to Lancaster’s usual traffic problems, the afternoon was given over to a number of speakers: Tony Bonser, Dying Matters Champion for the North West kicked off with introductions. Closely followed by Robert Caunce from Ascension and Cliff Funeral Directors who explained what a funeral director does. We also heard, from a colleague, how Robert has recently incorporated professional bereavement counselling into the service he provides, and how this is helping not only clients, but also staff working in the bereavement service.

Next, Olivia Egdell-Page of Joseph A. Jones and Co Solicitors spoke about how a solicitor can help deal with many aspects that arise when faced with a bereavement.

Then Gail Capstick, of the Transition Approaches to Death & Dying group of Transition City Lancaster and also a regular at our CLG lectures, spoke on how we might make funerals greener and more environmentally friendly.

Finally Tony Bonser brought the speakers to a conclusion and we moved on to the Death Café, where people were able to enjoy tea and cake whilst discussing thoughts and points raised through the day.


All in all the event was a great success, we have received very positive feedback and would like to thank all those who took part, helped with arrangements, gave their time on the day or attended to hear the talks. Thank you all very much.

I hope to post some of the content online in audio format over the coming weeks, so please keep checking here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/home

This week…

This coming Wednesday (17th May 2017) Dr Jack Brettle, Honorary Fellow at Aberystwyth University will present his Lunchtime Lecture 'Tomorrow's World'.

Dr Jack Brettle's background is as a materials scientist with a career which covered solid state physics, electrochemistry, surface science, biotechnology and nanotechnology. Since retirement he has developed a particular interest in the ways in which rapid technological developments will impinge on the world of tomorrow. The talk will focus on the impact of information technology and genetics on future health care.

Jack’s talk will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where group members will have a chance to explore further the themes of the talk.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

Have a good week and we hope you can join us for the lecture and the discussion.


06-05-17

At the end of a week which saw many people around the country go to the polling booths to vote in local elections, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday we had a visit from Gary Rycroft, solicitor with Joseph A. Jones & Co. Solicitors and he enlightened us as to how we might disinherit our children.

In his interesting lecture, Gary took us through a number of considerations when determining our financial legacy after death. We were introduced to aspects of the law which come into play when executing a will, how we might go about including others or, alternatively, excluding them.

Gary used a number of case studies to demonstrate how the law has approached certain wills and testaments in the past and how disputes, which are quite common, have been tackled in an attempt to bring justice to all parties concerned.

The lecture brought in a number of important aspects which we, as members of the public, were not necessarily clear on, regarding automatic entitlement and the hierarchy of entitlement that currently exists, and how it has changed over time.

We then went on to have a vibrant Research & Discussion Forum, where we were able to discuss the issues raised in light of our own experience.

If you would like to hear the audio recording of this session, you can do so on our main website, here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



This week…

This coming Wednesday 10th May 2017, to mark National Dying Matters Awareness Week and In conjunction with Lancaster University and the Centre for Ageing Research, the Continuing Learning Group is hosting a special event…

“Why do I need to make a will? Can I have a "green funeral"? What do I say to someone who has been bereaved? Do I need a Lasting Power of Attorney when I am not ill? What happens to my Facebook page after I die?... If you have any questions about anything to do with end of life, death, funerals and the rest, come along to a Dying Matters Awareness Day to find some answers, and maybe some more questions you haven't even thought of yet...

Dying Matters Awareness Event
Wednesday 10th May 2017
St Pauls Parish Hall,
Scotforth,
Lancaster.
LA1 4ST
10.30am until 3pm

Provisional Programme is as follows:

10:30am Welcome and Introduction.

10:45am Film - Conversation For Life.

11.00am Advance Planning using free tools with Janet Ross - formerly Age UK.
Including:
Lasting Power of Attorney,
Advance Decisions to Refuse Treatment,
Advance Statements.

12:00 Lunch- Bring your own or order bread and soup £4.50 (by May 3rd)

1:00pm Speakers:
Introductions – Tony Bonser – Dying Matters Champion for the North West.
What does a Funeral Director Do? - Robert Caunce from Cliff Small Funerals.
Why use a Solicitor? - Olivia Egdell-Page, Joseph A. Jones and Co. Solicitors.
Can you have a greener funeral? - Gail Capstick, Transition City Lancaster.

2:30pm Death Cafe - Tea and free cake and chat.

3:00pm Conclusion.

Come along and hear speakers, watch films, eat cake and think about what you can do for yourself and for others.

Stalls: Staff and volunteers from St John's Hospice, Glass memorials and more.

For more information on this event feel free to contact the Continuing Learning Group
Tel: 07732027490

Tea and coffee available.

Everyone is Welcome.




Other news…

Of course, there are a number of local events taking place during Dying Matters Awareness Week, here is a selection:


Monday 8th May:

Woodland - French and Mottershead, Lancaster Arts at Lancaster University.
Poetic audio artwork. Tel: 01524 594151
https://www.lancasterarts.org/

The Etiquette of Grief: Ellie Harrison, Lancaster Arts at Lancaster University.
8pm A Guide to Coping with Bereavement.
https://www.lancasterarts.org/

Death Cafe, Esquires - Ian Dewar Hospital Chaplain 7pm.



Tuesday 9th May:

Dying Matters Event Hornby, Compassion in Dying and Phoenix Arts,
When I cannot speak what do I want to say? 10:00-12:00

Macmillan Bus Morrison’s Supermarket, Morecambe - all day.

The Crossing - Ellie Harrison 2-5pm
Conversations about ways to say goodbye.
Peter Scott Gallery, Lancaster University.


Wednesday 10th May:

Dying Matters Event,
Continuing Learning Group at St Pauls Parish Hall, 10-3pm
Film, talks, cake.


Thursday 11th May:

Exhibition, Manchester Whitworth Gallery.


Friday 12th May:

Big Bus, Leyland Supermarkets and St Catherine’s Hospice.


More information on Dying Matters Week events can be found here:
http://www.dyingmatters.org/



And finally…

Frailty Research- Friends Meeting House 10-12, Monday 8th May.
Dr Catherine Walshe is carrying out a research study and needs older people to take part in discussion of "frailty" and how best to support. If you would like to take part in Catherine’s research, please send her an email: c.walshe@lancaster.ac.uk


Thanks for your attention, have a good week.



27-04-17

At the end of a week which has seen the two outsiders take centre stage in the French General Election, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last week Lyn Summers, former Principal Inspector at the Health and Safety Executive's, Nuclear Installations Inspectorate set the scene for this term with his fascinating lecture 'Nuclear Energy - How do we know it's safe?'

Lyn is a retired Principal Inspector at the Health and Safety Executive's, Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (now an agency renamed the Office of Nuclear Regulation).

In his talk Lyn reviewed the basics of nuclear power technology, what is meant by 'safety' and how the criteria for safety has been developed in the UK and world-wide. He discussed how safety is analysed to establish that the criteria for safe operation are met. Finally, he spoke on various aspects with regards to designing and operating nuclear reactors to ensure they are safe to operate.

This was a very interesting lecture which informed us of the changes that have taken place in the nuclear industry over recent decades in an attempt to make the industry safer for both workers and the public. We then followed on from the lecture with a vibrant discussion where attendees were able to air their concerns about nuclear power and its long term issues.

I will be posting the audio version of the lecture online over the coming week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (3rd May 2017) Gary Rycroft, solicitor with Joseph A. Jones & Co. Solicitors will present his Lunchtime Lecture 'How to Disinherit Your Children'.

Gary attended Morecambe High School and then read Law at the University of Manchester. After taking his degree in 1994, he obtained a Post Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice at the College of Law in Chester. He was admitted as a solicitor in 1998 and joined Joseph A. Jones & Co in 2003, becoming a partner in 2005.

Gary undertakes a mixed caseload of work. He spends much of his time dealing with will drafting and trust and estate administration and enjoys lifetime planning for high value and complex estates, including the mitigation of Inheritance Tax. In recent years, Gary has also developed expertise dealing with a significant number of family inheritance disputes. Gary has an interest in dealing with the affairs of the elderly, powers of attorney and Court of Protection matters."

Gary also contributes to a number of publications and media including local and national newspapers, radio and television.

In this Lunchtime Lecture Gary will explore how we might disinherit our children.

Following on from the lecture we will have a short AGM then we will continue on with the Research & Discussion Forum as usual, where everyone will get chance to chat on the subject matter of the lecture.

All events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm. We hope you can join us.

Thanks for your attention.

Dave

(on behalf of the CLG Steering Group)



18-03-17

Hello,

At the end of a week where many people celebrated Saint Patrick’s day, and American President, Donald Trump read out his favourite old Irish proverb, which was actually part of a poem "Remember to forget", written by Nigerian Albashir Adam Alhassan, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Bela Chattergee of Lancaster University Law School presented her Lunchtime Lecture 'Punishment Beyond the Legal Offender'.

In her lecture, Bela introduced us to the work of Megan Comfort, who has undertaken extensive study of the wives and girlfriends of inmates at San Quentin Prison, California. We heard how Comfort has examined the way in which for many loved ones, prison becomes a highly ambivalent space. We learned how the partners of prisoners experience a form of secondary prizonisation, where strict inhibitions are imposed on their lives similar to those experienced by their prisoner partners. Restrictions are imposed on their dress code, their time, their finances, amongst other things. However, Bela also spoke about the positive aspects experienced by the partners of prisoners, such as, increased safety from domestic violence, increased fidelity and devotion.

I will be posting the audio of Bela’s lecture online soon:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



This week…

This coming Wednesday (22nd March 2017) Dr Emmanuel Tsekleves, senior lecturer in Design Interactions here at Lancaster University will bring our term to a close with his Lunchtime Lecture
'Ageing Playfully'.

Emmanuel designs interactions between people, places and products by forging creative design methods along with digital technology. His design-led research in the areas of health, ageing, wellbeing and defence has generated public interest and attracted media attention by the national press, such as the Daily Mail, Daily Mirror, The Times, the Daily Mail, Discovery News and several other international online media outlets.

Emmanuel researches health promoting innovations by 'designing out' the problems and barriers that prevent health-promoting behaviours. He designs technology inspired health interventions and services that are created by end-users that aim to improve quality of life through play and playful interactions. His research also looks at exploring healthy futures that ordinary people would prefer, by using design fictions (provocative prototypes) that engage and encourage people to envision, explain and raise questions about direction of future technology and society.

This looks like a great lecture to finish the term, with lots of chance to think positively about a future, where design can really be employed to benefit us all, rather than disable those of use with limiting conditions.

The lecture will take place in Fylde lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.


And so, to the end of term…

As I mentioned, Emmanuel’s lecture will bring the term to a close. What a short term it seems to have been this time! We’ve had some exceptional lectures in such broad subjects as forensic radiology, Chippendale furniture and speech content. Could we be more far reaching? I think not, but we will try!

Next term begins for the CLG on Wednesday 26th April with a lecture by Lyn Summers on safety in regards to nuclear power. We also have lectures on how to disinherit your children, and the laws around religious symbols, and we will be hosting a special event to mark Dying Matters Awareness Week. So, no chance of getting bored, that’s for sure.

The new list of next term’s lectures will be posted here as we get confirmation:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

I hope you have a good break over the next few weeks. We look forward to seeing you again for the new term. If you have any friends or family members who you think might enjoy our programme, please do let them know about us or bring them along. Everyone is welcome.


Best wishes,

Dave and the whole Steering Group.



11-03-17

At the end of a week when we learned that a large marble flowerpot that has been languishing in the gardens of Blenheim Palace for more than a century turned out to be a 1,800 year old Roman sarcophagus worth £300,000, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.



Last week…

Last Wednesday Dr Lara Warmelink of the Department of Psychology at Lancaster University presented her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Deception and Security'.

Firstly Lara began by looking at the status of lies. How they come about, the various types (white lies, truth bending, great big whoppers) and how they play a part in all our lives (not just the lives of politicians). As we moved through the world of untruths, we could feel a whole side of life, usually existing in the shadows, begin to come into clear view, presenting a whole range of possibilities.
We examined how body language and visual markers of lying can be inaccurate. We also were able to explore the difference between a lie and a piece of wrong information, believed to be correct. Lara really brought the subject to life and a certain sense of mischief bubbled under the surface throughout the session.

Finally, Lara discussed the specific area of her academic focus, that of Intentions. An altogether more mystical area of this fascinating subject.

I will be posting the audio recording of the lecture to our website soon. If you missed it, why not give it a listen. We will be sending a complimentary Rolls Royce Corniche to the 1000th listener. *wink*
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


This week…

This coming Wednesday (15th March 2017) Dr Bela Chattergee of Lancaster University Law School will present her Lunchtime Lecture 'Punishment Beyond the Legal Offender'.

Much attention has been paid to the prison population, but what of the loved ones whom they leave behind? This lecture introduces us to the ethnographic work of Megan Comfort, who has undertaken an extensive study of the wives and girlfriends of inmates at San Quentin Prison, California. Comfort examines the way in which for many loved ones, prison becomes a highly ambivalent space. We will learn how loved ones experience a form of secondary prizonisation, inhabiting a unique hinterland that is not quite free, yet not quite restricted. We will also discover how prison produces some surprisingly positive experiences alongside the negative ones.

Bela’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where group members will get plenty of chance to work with some of the ideas raised in the lecture.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.


We hope you can join us.




04-03-17

At the end of a week which has seen ‘Royle Family’ actor Ricky Tomlinson claim that the late ‘Countdown’ host Richard Whiteley was once a spy for MI5, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday Dr Siobhan Weare, lecturer with Lancaster Law School at Lancaster University, presented us with a lecture, quite different to the one we were expecting. Rather than the focus being on men as victims of domestic violence, Siobhan’s lecture focused on men as victims of sexual offences perpetrated by women. Despite this change of focus, attendees listened closely, asked some very worthwhile questions and fed back to Siobhan, via a written questionnaire, their feelings on the lecture content.

At present, the legal definition of rape in England and Wales is gendered, only recognising men as offenders. The law also only recognises as victims of rape, those who are penetrated by a penis.
This therefore excludes the female perpetrator-male victim paradigm, and more specifically those cases where male victims are ‘forced to penetrate’ female perpetrators. In her lecture, Siobhan argued that consideration needs to be given to legally recognising and thus labelling ‘forced to penetrate’ cases as rape.

In the Research & Discussion Forum which followed, we went on to discuss aspects of the lecture content, Siobhan’s expert delivery (which made a difficult subject more palatable) and our feelings on what the future might hold for legislation in this area.

I will be posting the audio recording of this lecture on our website over the coming weeks:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

This week…


This coming Wednesday (8th March 2017) Dr Lara Warmelink of the Department of Psychology at Lancaster University will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Deception and Security'.

Lara’s research focuses on detecting lies about intentions. One part of this is the study of intentions themselves: how they are made, remembered and executed. Lara is also trying to adapt traditional lie detection methods to detect lies about intentions. She studies verbal and non-verbal cues to deception and also investigate the efficiency of using computerised reaction time tasks.

If you want to know more about my Lara’s research you can read her article (from The Psychologist, Oct. 2013) here:
http://tinyurl.com/p6tvcqn

Lara’s lecture will be followed as usual, by the Research & Discussion Forum. There will be plenty of chance to explore the themes raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

Other news…

Gendering Global Challenges: what accounts for the divergent outcomes of the Arab Spring
The lecture begins at 4.15pm on Thursday 9th March. It will be held in SR6, Bowland North.

The Arab Spring of 2011 engulfed much of the Middle East and North Africa, but most countries either reverted to authoritarian rule or became embroiled in violence and internationalised armed conflicts.

On Thursday 9th March 2017, Professor Valentine Moghadam will give a lecture on the outcomes of the Arab Spring of 2011. Professor Moghadam argues that women’s legal status, social positions, and collective action prior to the Arab Spring helped shape the nature of the 2011 mass protests. She will also show why women fared far worse in Egypt than in Morocco and Tunisia.

Valentine Moghadam is Professor of Sociology and Director of the International Affairs Program at Northeastern University, Boston, USA. Previously she has been a section chief at UNESCO in Paris and senior researcher at the United Nations University’s WIDER Institute in Helsinki, Finland.

This event is part of the Security Lancaster Seminar Series. For more information, please visit the Lancaster University website:
http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/security-lancaster/news-and-events/seminar-series/


25-02-17

At the end of a week in which Storm Doris brought winds of more than 80mph forcing airports to cancel flights, rail operators cancel trains, and the loss of one life when a woman in Wolverhampton was, unfortunately, hit by flying debris from a building, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Professor Anne Wichman of the University of Central Lancashire’s Department of Language, Literature and International Studies presented her Lunchtime Lecture 'It’s Not What You Say But The Way That You Say It'.

In this lecture, Anne began with a discussion of ‘prosody’, the complex combination of pitch, loudness, speed and timbre, which serves to reinforce, or even completely change, the meaning of the words we speak. Anne discussed how we use prosody in our everyday interaction, and how consequences directly follow on from this. She also discussed some of the challenges it poses for speech technology, highlighting the relative ease of producing software which deals with a limited number of responses (such as a lift with only a certain number of floors), compared with speech-to-type software which must be able to work with a huge vocabulary and which benefits from learning from the individual user to become effective. We also looked at the possibility and limitations of using voice recognition for the future of digital access.

Anne’s lecture was followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees discussed aspects around prosody such as vocal expectation, occurrence in nature, and subversion of expectation.

The CLG would like to thank Anne for visiting us with such an interesting lecture, which took aspects of language we are all very familiar with, and then opened up a greater understanding for us all.

I will post the audio recording of the lecture to the website soon:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



This week…

This coming Wednesday (1st March 2017) Dr Siobhan Weare, Lecturer with Lancaster Law School here at Lancaster University will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Men as Victims of Domestic Violence'.

Siobhan's research interests are focused in the areas of criminal law and criminal justice (sexual offences, homicide, domestic abuse), gender (masculinities, femininities, gender and crime, gender theories) and criminal legal and criminological theories. She is currently exploring the socio-legal responses to women who commit serious offences, including homicide and sexual violence. More generally, Siobhan is also interested in violence against women, domestic violence, sexual offences, and criminal legal and gender theory. In addition to lecturing, Siobhan is Deputy Director of Admissions and Director of Communications for the Law School. In this Lunchtime Lecture, Siobhan will explore the under documented area of men, as victims of domestic violence.

Siobhan’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will get the chance to continue the discussion begun in the lecture.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

Thanks for your attention, have a good week.





18-02-17

At the end of a week where we heard that typical pensioner household incomes have overtaken working-age household incomes for the first time, and also learned that a quarter of this year's new pensioners will retire with a debt averaging more than £24,000, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Gill Baynes presented her second lecture on Forensic Radiology.
In this lecture Gill built on themes raised in her first lecture, and introduced us to a number of new themes. We looked at evidence produced from gun shots and stabbings, as well as evidence in children’s injuries which would point to mistreatment and the condition commonly known as ‘Shaken Baby Syndrome’. We were also introduced to what can ensue when risky sexual practices, such as autoeroticism, are carried out. We looked at the evidence which would indicate strangulation and hanging, and learned how we might differentiate between the two based on the radiological images.

This second lecture was a good addition to the previous lecture and, as promised, also worked as a stand-alone session. Expertly delivered, the lecture was packed with information and a few eye opening moments for the audience.

The audio recording of this lecture will be added to the website, here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


This week…

This coming Wednesday (22nd February 2017) Professor Anne Wichman of the University of Central Lancashire’s Department of Language, Literature and International Studies will present her Lunchtime Lecture 'It’s Not What You Say But The Way That You Say It'.

Prosody is the key to successful speech communication.

Prosody, or "tone of voice", is a complex combination of pitch, loudness, speed and timbre, which serves to reinforce, or even completely change, the meaning of the words we speak. In this lecture, Anne will discuss how we use prosody in our everyday interaction, and also some of the challenges it poses for speech technology.

We are very pleased to welcome Professor Anne Wichmann to Lancaster University to present her lecture on language, intonation and its consequences.

Anne’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will have the chance to explore the ideas and thoughts which the lecture has raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.




12-02-17

At the end of a week which has seen Britain engaged in a fierce debate with itself over whether to welcome America’s President, Donald Trump, in light of the changes he has instigated against minority groups in the USA since his recent inauguration, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, Debbie Parkinson, from the Innovation Agency showed the group a variety of practical technology enabled solutions to health improvement.
One of these was a wrist strap that can monitor exercise, sleep heart rate etc. in a similar way to a ‘Fitbit’. However, this one does more and costs less. She illustrated its usefulness with an anecdote from a diabetes patient who was suddenly experiencing sleep deprivation. A doctor viewing the data was able to adjust the timing of the patient safety food intake and the problem was solved.

We also enjoyed looking at 3D printed body parts used by surgeons to prepare for complex operations.
Try a Google search of ‘Get Active’ for a range of innovative technology that is available to purchase now.

The audio recording of the session will be added to the website soon:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


This week…

This coming Wednesday (15th February 2017) Professor Gill Baynes, former Professor of Medical Imaging Education at the University of Cumbria and CLG Steering Group member will present
'Forensic Radiology #2'.

This is the second lecture Gill is presenting for us this term on Forensic Radiology.
Her first lecture was, given on 1st February, was hugely informative and clearly set the scene. This lecture takes things further, and promises to be equally fascinating.

Please Note: These lectures are designed to stand alone so don't worry if you were unable to attend the previous one, you will still learn a lot from this lecture.

Gill’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees can explore the subject further.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.




05-02-17

At the end of a week in which we learned that Hillary Clinton is to quit politics to open the world’s largest donkey sanctuary, and a parliamentary inquiry has been opened into the growing phenomenon of so-called "fake news", we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.



Last week…

Last Wednesday, Professor Gill Baynes presented the first of her two lectures on Forensic Radiology.
Gill expertly took us through the elements of radiology which are used to determine gender, such as pelvic width and skull details. We then moved on to age determination based on bone development and also looked at ethnicity indicators.
There were some challenging photos in the presentation illustrating the types of case that Forensic Radiologists deal with. For the benefit of the sensitive amongst us, Gill was kind enough to warn us beforehand. This was a fascinating start to the two lecture series, and we look forward to Gill’s next lecture, which will take place on Wednesday 15th February 2017.

We followed on from Gill’s lecture with a vibrant and far reaching discussion in the RDF….

I will post the audio recording of the lecture on our website in due course:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures




This week…

This coming Wednesday (8th February 2017) Debbie Parkinson (Innovation Agency) & Andrew Michaelson (Care Innovation) visit to present their session, 'Get Active: Improving Physical Fitness and Quality of Life through Group Activity'.

A little information about ‘Care Innovation’...

"Care Innovation is an assistive technology solution founded by specialists in practical technology-enabled care solutions that engage, support and benefit people with the widest possible range of needs. Care Innovation’s flagship programme is Get Active, an innovative digital physical activity service that supports groups or individuals. Get Active can transform health and wellbeing across a wide range of ages and needs through directed physical fitness promotion aimed at extending healthy lifespan and addressing issues such as social isolation and digital exclusion."

A little information on ‘The Innovation Agency’...

"We are the Academic Health Science Network for the North West Coast, covering Cheshire, Merseyside, Lancashire and South Cumbria, with around 4.1 million residents. Our footprint includes 22 NHS providers, 20 CCGs, nine universities and a large number of life science industry partners.

Our core purpose is to spread innovation, improve health, and generate economic growth.
We are catalysts for the spread of innovation at pace and scale - improving health, generating economic growth and helping facilitate change across whole health and social care economies.
We connect regional networks of NHS and academic organisations, local authorities, the third sector and industry - responding to the diverse needs of our patients and populations through partnership and collaboration.
We create the right environment for relevant industries to work with the health and social care system.​"


Following the lecture session there will be the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get chance to discuss many of the ideas raised.

We hope you can join us.




29-01-17

At the end of a week which saw the President of the United States and the Prime Minister of the UK walk hand in hand through the White House grounds, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, Professor Kamilla Elliott, Prof of Literature and Media with the English and Creative Writing Department at Lancaster University, presented her lecture 'Crime, Punishment, and Picture Identification in A Tale of Two Cities'.

In the lecture, Kamilla began by looking at the concept of picture identification in the Victorian era. Kamilla explained how rare pictorial ID was and how most ID was done using words and description. She also spoke about how people were wary of early photography, unsure of how reliable it was in presenting the likeness of a person accurately. We then looked at resemblance between individuals and how it might be exploited towards certain ends. Kamilla did an excellent job of exploring Dickens’ ideas and thought processes when constructing A Tale of Two Cities. The storyline was brought to life as we playfully explored Dickens’ work contextually.


We then moved on to the Research & Discussion Forum, which was dominated by our thoughts, feelings and fears in light of the recent political changes which have taken place in the USA.

I will add the audio recording of the lecture to the website over the coming days:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


This week…

This coming Wednesday (1st February 2017) Professor Gill Baynes, former Professor of Medical Imaging Education at the University of Cumbria, CLG Steering Group Member & Chair of Lancaster & Morecambe U3A, will present her first lecture of a two lecture series entitled 'Forensic Radiology #1'

You will remember Gill from her recent sessions where she presented us with excellent lectures on medical ethics and various aspects of medical research. We are very pleased to welcome Gill (now a member of our Steering Group) back to give two lectures on Forensic Radiology.
Gill will discuss how Radiology contributes to forensics starting with the use of X-rays and moving onto the role that more sophisticated imaging modalities play. Issues addressed will include victim identification, establishing the cause of death and non-accidental injury in children.
These two lectures are not for the faint hearted!

Please Note: These lectures are designed to stand alone so don't worry if you are unable to attend both. The second lecture in this series will take place on Wednesday 15th February 2017.

The lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will be able to continue discussion on the Forensic Radiology theme.

Both the lecture and the R&DF will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.


Other news…


This coming week, CLG member Alex Rizenko will take part in a campus event with the Lancaster University Rowing Society. This rowing event, which takes place in Alexander Square, will raise money for the mental health charity ‘Mind’ and in taking part, Alex aims to raise awareness of the possibilities for older people engaging in sporting events alongside younger participants. He will be representing the Continuing Learning Group, bringing much needed publicity to our cause. We would like to thank Alex and wish him the best of luck in his endeavours. Go Alex!


22-01-17

At the end of a week which saw the inauguration of the 45th President of the United States of America, immediately followed by the largest demonstrations ever witnessed in one day as women from all across the United States sent out a clear message that they will not tolerate second class citizen status, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.



Last week…

Last Wednesday we began the term with an excellent Lunchtime Lecture by Dr Brian Hodgson, formerly of Lancaster University Ruskin Centre and a long standing member of the Continuing Learning Group, entitled 'The Age of Rococo, Hogarth and Chippendale'.

Brian began by illustrating how Englandboth copied from the French, yet despised them. Brian introduced us to Chippendale's book ‘The Gentlemen's and Cabinet-Maker's Director’, a book central to this evolution Brian also discussed how the work of Robert Adam had a great influence on the style of the time. We also explored the ways in which furniture was designed using basic plans, which could then be embellished to suit the client’s taste.

Brian presented a very enjoyable lecture where his love of furniture from that period was quite evident. He spoke with us of his desire to take his interest further, and we whole heartedly wish him the best in his endeavors in that direction.



Brian’s lecture was then followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees had the chance to discuss further some of the ideas and themes which Brian had raised.

I will edit the audio recording of the lecture in due course, and hope to create an accompanying set of photographs which will assist when listening to the lecture.

This, and other lecture recordings will be available via this link:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



This week…

This coming Wednesday (25th January 2017) Professor Kamilla Elliott, of the Department of English and Creative Writing at Lancaster University will present her Lunchtime Lecture 'Crime, Punishment, and Picture Identification in A Tale of Two Cities'.

Kamilla Elliott grew up in the UK, moving to the US after A levels. She received her B.A. in Mass Communications and Theatre from the University of Colorado in 1980 and pursued postgraduate studies in film at Boston University from 1981-82. After working in elder care and health research, she returned to academia in 1989, earning an A.L.M. degree through Harvard's adult education programme in 1991. From there, she entered Harvard University, where she completed a Ph.D. in English and American Literature and Language in 1996. She taught Victorian studies and interdisciplinary literature/film studies at the University of California at Berkeley from 1996-2004. During that time she published research on literature and film, including Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate (Cambridge UP, 2003).

Kamilla’s research interests lie in literature's relationship with other media, especially the visual arts and film. She has presented highly stimulating lectures for us in the past and we look forward to welcoming Kamilla back to the CLG to discuss ‘A Tale of Two Cities’.

We will then have a Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will be able to discuss themes from the lecture.



Other news…


A host of activities will be held in and around Lancaster to mark Holocaust Memorial Day 2017.

The University will host a commemoration and candle-lighting, a tree planting ceremony and a diversity tour, while events will also take place at the Priory, Lancaster Castle and the University of Cumbria.

This year's Holocaust Memorial Day has the theme 'How can life go on?'. Author and survivor of the Holocaust Elie Wiesel said: "For the survivor death is not the problem. Death was an everyday occurrence. We learned to live with Death. The problem is to adjust to life, to living. You must teach us about living." The aftermath of the Holocaust and of subsequent genocides continues to raise challenging questions for individuals, communities and nations. HMD 2017 asks audiences to think about what happens after genocide and of our own responsibilities in the wake of such a crime.

Holocaust Memorial Day is held on 27th January every year and remembers victims of the Holocaust as well as subsequent genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur.

Events in Lancaster are organised by the Lancaster & Lakes Jewish Community together with Faith in Lancaster, More Music, Lancaster City Council and Lancaster Priory Church.

The full programme of events is as follows…

Interfaith service at the Lancaster Priory.
Sunday 22nd January, 6.30pm
Music, prayers and reflections from a variety of traditions.

Film screening: The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas
Tuesday 24th January, 6pm and Wednesday 25th January, 2pm
Book here: www.cumbria.ac.uk/about/events/university-events/lancaster/film-club-holocaust-memorial-day-on-the-27th-january.php

Commemorating the Holocaust at Lancaster Castle
Thursday 26th January, 6.30pm
The commemoration will begin at Lancaster Castle with candle lighting and prayers, followed by performances and reflections at the Storey.

Commemoration and candle lighting
Friday 27th January, from noon
Throughout the day, Alexandra Square, Lancaster University

Tree planting ceremony - Tu B'Shvat
Sunday 29th January, 10.45am
Celebrating the Jewish New Year at Lancaster University Memorial Woodland.

Diversity tour
Sunday 29th January, 11.15am
Starting in the Jewish Rooms at Lancaster University, enjoy a bagel brunch and then visit the Mosque in Lancaster.

For more information about local events, visit www.moremusic.org.uk/events/289/HMD2017
For information about Holocaust Memorial Day, visit www.hmd.org.uk




15-01-17

Hello,

I would like to begin by wishing you all a very healthy and prosperous new year.

Our new term begins this coming Wednesday (18th January 2017) with a lecture by Dr Brian Hodgson, formerly of Lancaster University Ruskin Centre entitled 'The Age of Rococo, Hogarth and Chippendale'.

"This is the eighteenth century when this country both copied from the French, yet despised them. It is the great age where the English seek their own style or styles. Chippendale's book The Gentlemen's and Cabinet-Maker's Director is central to this evolution, it came out in three editions--the first two were similar but the third edition shows Robert Adam's influence and the new Neo-classical where the style matured. The story includes some weird and doubtful business dealings including bogus claims to be working for the Royal Family and smuggling into England contraband flat pack furniture from despised France."

In this lecture Brian will focus on the 18th century with emphasis on Thomas Chippendale's work-‘the greatest cabinet maker in our history’. He will also discuss the style we call Rococo, its development in France and its mixed reception in Britain. We will look at the cultural climate and Chippendale's complicated response. His amazing business prowess will also be touched upon, and of course more fabulous chairs!

Brian’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get chance to explore themes and ideas from the lecture.

Events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm,
I hope you can join us. Feel free to bring a friend, all are welcome.

I’m pleased to say that last term’s lecture recordings are now all up on the website, including the fascinating recent lecture on Trump, Brexit and the Special Relationship.
This was an excellent talk, highly relevant in light of Trump’s forthcoming Presidential inauguration. I would recommend giving it a listen if you were unable to attend the session.
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures
To listen to this lecture recording, just click on the link above, wait for the player to load up, then click on the play button (circle with an arrow in it). Note: Please make sure your speakers are set at an appropriate level before attempting to play a lecture recording.


Also…

We would like to inform you about a forthcoming event.

Exhibition Launch.
6pm, Wednesday 25 January

Lancaster University Peter Scott Gallery would like to invite you to their upcoming exhibition launch where you can meet the artists: Rebecca Chesney and Andy Holden.

This season the gallery features work by Rebecca Chesney, an artist dealing with perceptions of climate change, land and environmental issues. This has a poignant resonance in the wake of the U.S. election where Chesney is currently undertaking a residency.

In the main gallery, there is a presentation of works by Andy Holden, whose films sit at the centre of an exhibition that rewrites physics using laws found in the world of cartoons.

During the evening you'll have the chance to hear from the artists themselves on their work and their exhibitions installed within the Peter Scott Gallery.

Exhibition Launch
Free. 6-7.30pm, 25 January 2017
Peter Scott Gallery, Lancaster

No pre-booking is required. Both exhibitions run until the 17 March 2017.
So, if you can’t make it along on the launch night, you have plenty of time to catch the exhibition over the coming weeks.

For more information on this and other Campus arts events, please visit the website:
https://www.lancasterarts.org/whats-on


Thanks for your attention.

Best wishes,
Dave

(on behalf of the CLG Steering Group)



11-12-16


Hello,

At the end of a week which saw Morecambe Parish Church host a memorably colourful Christmas tree festival and Christmas market enjoyed by many, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday John Gilchrist blew our minds with his lecture on Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity. John demonstrated his extensive knowledge on the subject by explaining how Einstein was able to move from his earlier Special Theory of Relativity towards a theory which incorporates gravity. It is now 101 years since the theory was first proposed, and we still feel there is a way to go to gain a full understanding of our universe.

I will post the audio recording of this lecture online over the Christmas period:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

This week…

This coming Wednesday (14th December 2016) is our last session of the year and we will pay a visit to the Lancaster University Ruskin Library and Research Centre to see the current exhibition entitled 'Gilded Shadows: the stones of Ruskin’s Venice'.

'Ruskin's first visit to Venice was in 1835 at the age of 16. The city, which he visited 11 times, had a lifelong influence on him, both emotionally and intellectually. Initially seduced by its romantic beauty, he later chose to undertake a far deeper study of its history, art and architecture than anyone had previously attempted, in his three volume major work The Stones of Venice. This exhibition shows highlights of his work from different visits side by side with recent photographs by renowned photographer of Venice, Sarah Quill. Her 40 years recording the architecture and daily life of Venice in photographs rivals Ruskin’s own fascination with, and dedication to, this beautiful city.'

Please meet in the foyer of the Ruskin Centre on campus (the white oval building by the roundabout) in the run up to 1pm.

This will be followed by a Jacob's Join in our usual venue (Fylde Lecture Theatre 3) to finish what has been a wonderfully interesting term. Please bring food and drink to share.

Other news…

Before we go, here is a research project which you may like to get involved in…

Juliana Kamaroddin, a PhD student at the InfoLab (Computing Department) from Lancaster University is looking for Cognitive Health Technology Workshop Participants. She is looking for 10-15 participants that are retired, healthy from cognitive impairment or any other mental health condition and aged between 60-80 years. As an incentive to help participants, Juliana will make a modest contribution to the cost of travel to the workshop.

This research is based on a case study called MODEM (Monitoring of Dementia using Eye Movements). MODEM is one kind of pervasive healthcare monitoring systems that uses eye tracking to detect early sign of dementia through eye movements with everyday activities such as watching TV and making tea. Its vision is to capture diagnostic eye movements and people’s behaviour at a natural and relaxed mode in a home environment setting with ambient and unnoticeable technologies. The department are interested in the general idea of participants being monitored in their home. They want to understand the practical difficulties of having sensors positioned in one’s own home. For example would it be appropriate to have eye trackers positioned in one’s living room and kitchen? Participants will be simply be asked for their reaction to some envisioned scenarios of how technology could be positioned within their home.

Juliana is hoping to conduct this workshop in January 2017. If you would like to volunteer, please contact Juliana direct:

Name : Juliana Kamaroddin (researcher)
Address : InfoLab21, Lancaster University, Lancaster, LA1 4WA United Kingdom
Telephone : 07514222365
Email : j.kamaroddin@lancaster.ac.uk

And finally…

The new term begins on Wednesday January 18th 2017, and we have some very interesting subject areas to explore. The schedule currently includes antique furniture, radiology, nuclear power, tomorrow’s world and a number of other areas yet to be confirmed. All in all it looks set to be quite fascinating. Keep an eye on our website for details as they are confirmed.

I think 2016 has generally been regarded as a challenging year, more so than most. I would like to wish you warm season’s greetings. We at the CLG Steering Group hope you enjoy your forthcoming seasonal celebrations, whatever form they may take. See you again in 2017!

With best wishes,

Dave and the whole Steering Group.




04-12-16

At the end of a week where we have said goodbye to the long-suffering Fawlty Towers waiter, Manuel (namely the highly respected actor Andrew Sachs), we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday Thomas Mills, lecturer in Diplomacy and Foreign Policy with the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion here at Lancaster University presented his lecture 'Trump, Brexit, and the Future of the Special Relationship'.

2016 has been nothing if not a year of political upheaval. In this lecture Thomas began by outlining the history and details of the ‘Special Relationship’, the close political, diplomatic, cultural, economic, military and historical relations between the United Kingdom and the United States, first defined during the Churchill/Roosevelt era. We explored the reasons for such a relationship in terms of political common ground, but also in terms of the enablement of a relationship between the USA and the European Union.

Thomas then looked at the Trump phenomenon and the Brexit outcome of the referendum, drawing some comparisons and identifying some differences in terms of fear, hope and political game playing. We were able to appreciate how the outcome of these momentous political events, and no doubt forthcoming political events, emerge directly from the political and economic climate that precedes them.

I will be posting the audio recording of the lecture online in the near future:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

This week…

This Wednesday (7th December 2016) Dr John Gilchrist will present his Lunchtime Lecture ‘101 years of Relativity’.

“In 1905, Albert Einstein determined that the laws of physics are the same for all non-accelerating observers, and that the speed of light in a vacuum was independent of the motion of all observers. This was the theory of special relativity. It introduced a new framework for all of physics and proposed new concepts of space and time.

Einstein then spent 10 years trying to include acceleration in the theory and published his theory of general relativity in 1915. In it, he determined that massive objects cause a distortion in space-time, which is felt as gravity.” (From space.com)

John Gilchrist MA PhD (Cambridge) was supervised as a student by Professor Roland Dobbs who founded the Physics Department at Lancaster University. Until retirement he has since been a researcher at the Centre de Recherches sur les Très Basses Températures (CNRS) in Grenoble, France.

In this lecture John will examine Einstein’s theory, now 101 years old. The lecture will then be followed by a Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will have plenty of chance to discuss issues raised in the lecture.

Both events will take place in our usual room, Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

Other news…

We would like to inform you of a project which is taking place…

Intergenerational Mentoring Project.

“We are just about to start in earnest the second year of a new mentoring project. It is run within the framework of the U3A, but you don’t need to be a member to become involved. The idea was ‘imported’ from Glasgow, where such a project has been running for about 5 years; more information about that project can be gleaned from their website: http://www.intergenerationalmentoring.com/ .

Our own project has developed very much along similar lines. We have a group of a dozen or more senior, experienced individuals of a wide range of professional backgrounds who are matched up with a corresponding number of students from the lower sixth form of Morecambe Community High School, the only local school currently involved in the scheme. The students are chosen by the school on the basis that they have the potential to progress to higher education and are considering it, but don’t have the higher education experience and knowhow within their friend-and-family-network that could help them clarify their aims in respect of a possible higher education course and negotiate the paths leading to successful entry into a rewarding course. The interactions are always student-led; the mentors are there to help open the students’ eyes to new possibilities, new ways of looking at the world and improving the quality of their decision-making.

Anyone who may be interested in becoming involved should contact the project organiser: Stephen Breuer (01524 63579 and s_and_b_breuer19@hotmail.com), who can provide more information about the project and about the experiences of the mentors in its first year of operation.”

This is a very worthwhile project, offering the chance for older people to have a positive impact on younger people’s futures. We hope you will consider taking part.

And finally…

Lancaster University Centre for Ageing Research are pleased to announce a seminar on environmental challenges in older age, including the impact of climate change (floods and heatwaves), and the potential risk of air pollution in the development of dementia. There will be a discussion of key issues following the presentations.


Time – Thursday 8th December 2016 1:30pm – 4:30pm
Place – Human Resources Building Training Room 1&2

Speakers:

Prof Barbara Maher & Prof David Allsop:
‘Airborne particulate pollution as a potential environmental risk factor for Alzheimer's disease’

Prof Gordon Walker
‘Heatwaves, vulnerabilities and climate change: problems for and with care provision for older people

C4AR members, postgraduate students and staff welcome. This seminar is free to attend but there are only limited places available.

Please register by contacting Jan Lyons at: jan.lyons@lancaster.ac.uk

For more information about the topic, please email: Dr Amanda Bingley, Division of Health Research.
(a.bingley@lancaster.ac.uk)

Thanks for your attention, have a good week.


27-11-16

At the end of a week where we’ve experienced hard frosts heralding the approach of Winter Solstice, Christmas, Hanukkah and a whole range of celebrations taking place in the final furlong of 2016, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, Dr Maria Christou, who recently gained her PhD, visited us to give her lecture 'Depictions of Genetically Modified Foods in Contemporary Fiction'.

Maria began by situating the issue of genetically modified foods in Foucauldian terms regarding binary positions of natural/unnatural, normal/abnormal. This was a useful starting point. Though, in some ways over simplistic, she was able to demonstrate how this framework has defined the discourse around GM foods. Maria looked at public perceptions around the crossing of boundaries, between plants, plants and animals etc. Attention was also given to the ethics, both in terms of the biological aspects and the business practices. We then looked at literature which has explored these areas utilising the fictional novel format.

This was a very multidimensional lecture with plenty of food for thought (no pun intended) around GMOs, the increasing role of large corporations, ethics and of course fictional literature as a format for exploring large issues.

Unfortunately, we are unable to post an audio version of the lecture online as Maria has a book on the subject coming out in the next year. However, we do hope to invite her back to talk with us again when her work has been published.


As usual, we chatted about the themes afterwards in the Research & Discussion Forum. Attendees aired their fears and concerns about the future of our food and business practices, as well as expressing their optimism in certain areas.

This week…

This coming Wednesday (30th November 2016) Dr Thomas Mills, Lecturer in Diplomacy and Foreign Policy with the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion here at Lancaster University, will present his timely Lunchtime Lecture entitled 'Trump, Brexit, and the Future of the Special Relationship'.

2016 has been nothing if not a year of political upheaval. This lecture explores the prospects for Britain's 'special relationship' with the United States in the context of Brexit and the US Presidential election.

Thomas states…

"My research lies in the field of international relations in the twentieth century, with particular interests in US foreign policy towards Latin America and diplomatic relations between the US and Great Britain. My recent book, Post-War Planning on the Periphery, explored Anglo-American relations in South America during the Second World War in the broader context of the post-war economic diplomacy undertaken by the wartime allies. My current research projects include a collaborative project exploring Anglo-American relations in Latin America throughout the 20th century; an exploration of the role of British and American business groups in economic diplomacy; and a project exploring Britain's emerging role in Latin America at the turn of the 21st century."

This promises to be a very interesting and topical lecture and there will be plenty of chance to pose questions and theorise on the future of politics on both sides of the Atlantic.

The Lunchtime Lecture will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm, with the Research & Discussion Forum following at around 2.30pm in the same venue.

We hope you are able to join us.



Other news…

The Continuing Learning Group is having a baby!

We are very pleased to announce that Steering Group member Zsuzsanna and her husband, long time CLG supporter, Rory are due to have a baby in June of 2017. We would like to congratulate them wholeheartedly. We look forward to a new CLG member down the line.

Thanks for your continued support, have a good week.


20-11-16

At the end of a week when we have been graced with a supermoon, appearing around 14% bigger and 30% brighter than usual, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday Dr Garuth Chalfont of the Department of Health Research at Lancaster University, spoke to us about non-drug treatments to Intervene and prevent dementia.

Garuth discussed the high costs of dementia, in both monetary and emotional terms. We were told of a range of holistic approaches which can serve as treatments to help slow the rate of cognitive decline of those with dementia. Garuth has worked on a number of different garden designs which are aimed at those living with the condition. We heard about evidence of the benefits of appropriate activities, diet, cognitive stimulation, nature and psychological therapies to treat dementia.

We then followed on from the lecture with vibrant discussion in the Research & Discussion Forum. The afternoon provided attendees with a valuable chance to look at dementia from a different angle, which was very encouraging.


I will be posting the audio recording of the lecture online soon:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

This week…

This coming Wednesday (23rd November 2016) Dr Maria Christou of the English & Creative Writing department at Lancaster University, will present her Lunchtime Lecture, ‘Depictions of Genetically Modified Foods in Contemporary Fiction'.

Maria completed her PhD on the subject of food in twentieth-century literature and philosophy last academic year. Since then she has been working on another food-based project. Maria will speak on the representation of genetically modified food in contemporary fiction. The talk will explore the ethical ambiguities and unintended consequences that emerge from strict for/against positions on the matter.

Maria’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get plenty of chance to discuss the issues raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

We hope you can join us.


13-11-16

At the end of a week where we’ve said goodbye to actor Robert Vaughn, so long to singer/poet Leonard Cohen, and have remembered those lost in violent conflict over generations, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday Steering Group member Janet Ross-Mills spoke to us about the work she’s been carrying out with Lancaster and Morecambe Age UK around advanced planning for end of life.

The 'My Life, My Decision' project, which has run over the last couple of years, focussed on giving us all the chance to plan ahead and take important decisions well in advance of the final chapter of our lives. This project aimed to give people greater control and, in turn, more peace of mind with regards to the future.

Janet expertly took us through the advantages brought about by the project with reference to some participants. We heard of the areas which the project has covered such as planning, decision making, power of attorney, personal choice, and how families can be made aware of one’s preferences and wishes.

The lecture was followed by a vibrant and interesting Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees explored many of the issues raised.

We also watched a short film, made during the project by Compassion in Dying, which included our Steering Group member and good friend, George Henson. You can view this 5 minute film here:
https://youtu.be/ELnP0eSgSdo



This week…

16th November 2016 - Dr Garuth Chalfont, Research Associate with the Department of Health Research here at Lancaster University will present his Lunchtime Lecture on ‘Non-Drug Treatments to Intervene and Prevent Dementia’.

“Dementia costs the UK £26 billion yearly with no promising medicines on the immediate horizon. Meanwhile, holistic studies that have tested more than one factor successfully lowered dementia risk, slowed the decline, even reversed symptoms. It is high time to consider the evidence about activities, diet, cognitive stimulation, nature and psychological therapies to treat dementia. Come and hear the latest good news.”

Dr Garuth Chalfont, is a leading practitioner in the art and science of healing gardens, therapeutic spaces, and dementia gardens that incorporate the natural world into the healing process.
His design philosophy promotes activity with meaning and purpose, for rehabilitation and wellbeing, regardless of disability or impairment.

Garuth’s lecture will be followed, as usual, with the Research & Discussion Forum where there will be plenty of chance to discuss the concept of non-drug treatments for Dementia.

The Lunchtime Lecture will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm, with the R&DF following in the same venue after a short refreshment break.


We hope you can join us.





06-11-16

At the end of a week which has seen the Lancaster and Morecambe district move from the darkness of Halloween into the ‘Light up Lancaster’ festival and then onwards into the Guy Fawkes bonfire and fireworks celebrations, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, Jim Dickinson, Deputy Chair of the Lancaster Bench, took us through the subject area of Sentencing as part of the role of Magistrates in the UK. Jim presented us with a session which rounds off our series, a series that has been both interesting and informative. He enlightened us to the essential aspects of law, which must be taken into account when setting the appropriate sentence for a crime which has been committed. We then followed on with a Research & Discussion Forum which gave us the chance to fully explore the themes raised in the Lunchtime lecture.

This week…

This coming Wednesday (9th November 2016) Steering Group member, Janet Ross-Mills, who has been carrying out work for Lancaster and Morecambe Age UK, will present a Lunchtime Lecture considering her 'Conclusions from the Advanced Planning Project'.

As Janet comes to the end of the Age UK coordinated project 'My Life, My Decision', she will look back over the project, considering what has been learned, and how this worthwhile approach to our end of life care can be beneficial to us.

This will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will have a chance to look at the project and discuss its merits. This has been, in many ways, a ground breaking project enabling people to take control of their futures and to put in place plans that will benefit them at the end of life. We hope to look at the merits of the project and explore the value it might have in a wider context as we all live longer and face a number of important decisions as a consequence.

The Lunchtime Lecture and the Research & Discussion Forum will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

For more information on this and other lectures, take a look here::
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures



30-10-16

At the end of a week which has seen preparations take shape for both Diwali (festival of light) and Halloween (celebration of all things dark), we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday we were visited by Dr Jude Towers who spoke on the political aspects of statistics, with particular attention given to statistics around domestic violence.

Jude explained how the way we count has a significant impact on the data we collect, the methods we use to analyse it and the findings produced. Using a case study on violent crime, Jude explored what happened when she challenged a statistical solution to a substantial problem resulting in the reversal of the official trend in domestic violent crime, violent crime against women and ultimately in violent crime in England and Wales, post financial crisis.

The lecture was based on research carried out for an ESRC-funded Secondary Data Analysis Initiative by Professor Sylvia Walby, Professor Brian Francis and Jude, herself. This lecture gave great insight as to how statistics are used, and how quantitative research can enlighten us to social trends enabling us to gain a greater understanding.

The lecture created a great buzz amongst all attendees and this was carried into the Research & Discussion Forum which followed. Thanks go out to Jude who expertly raised our interest in quantitative research and the possibilities which it opens up.


This week…

This coming Wednesday (2nd November 2016) James Dickinson, Deputy Chair of the Lancaster Bench, will return to present the final Lunchtime Lecture on the subject of Magistracy. This session will focus on sentencing, an interesting area of Magistracy which is partly decided by the Magistrate themselves and partly by the framework of law which is firmly in place. Jim will look at the influences which must be taken into account when carrying out sentencing on a person who has been found guilty of committing an offence.

We will follow the lecture with a Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will be able to continue the discussion around themes which have been raised in the lecture, and indeed the series of lectures of which this marks the conclusion.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.


23-10-16

At the end of a week which saw deteriorating relations between the presidential candidates in the final televised debate before the American election, and things finally come to a head between neighbours Sam and Terry after that (alleged) punch up in the street, fuelled by the long running boundary fence dispute and copious amounts of alcohol, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…
Last Wednesday we paid a visit to Lancaster Magistrates Court where Jim Dickinson educated us to the protocols of the building. Jim and his colleague led a fascinating session where group members took part in a piece of scripted drama based around a dispute between neighbours (Sam and Terry, above) which culminated with one person getting hurt. This was an excellent way of introducing us to the fine points of a case which must be carefully considered in order to reach a verdict. We were able to see how the rule of law operates, with the ‘beyond reasonable doubt’ aspect of British law having many implications. This was a great learning process, clearly demonstrating that no case is ever straight forward, and that even the most simple of cases involves a large amount of data, witness testimonies, evidence and difficult decisions.
The final session of our Magistracy lectures will be on the subject of sentencing and will take place on 2nd November 2016. More of this in next week’s CLG News.

This week…
This coming Wednesday (26th October 2016) Dr Jude Towers, Lecturer in Sociology & Quantitative Methods here at Lancaster University will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'The Politics of Counting: Is Violence Increasing or Decreasing in England and Wales?'
‘The way we count has a significant impact on the data we collect, the methods we use to analyse it, the findings produced and thus what we know about the social world and how we design our research, policy and practice interventions in pursuit of making the world a better place. What or who is included or excluded, the boundary of our definitions, and the theory of change we seek to test and develop (whether implicit or explicit) are fundamental parts of the process and require critical examination.
Using a case study on violent crime, we will explore what happened when we challenged a statistical solution to a substantial problem resulting in the reversal of the official trend in domestic violent crime, violent crime against women and ultimately in violent crime in England, post financial crisis.’
Jude’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will get plenty of chance to discuss the many issues which may well be raised in this lecture.
The day’s events will begin at 1pm in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3, with the Research & Discussion Forum following the lecture around 2:30.
For more information on this and other aspects of the programme:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/home
Other news…
I would like to draw you attention to some up-coming research which Georgia Jameson and her colleague, Alex are undertaking in the next month, under supervision from Dr Trevor Crawford at Lancaster university.
Georgia, a third year Psychology student is researching in the area of memory/dementia, and in particular investigating the effects of bilateral eye movements on episodic memory. As such Georgia and Alex need participants to take part in the experiment and would welcome any members of your group who would be interested in taking part.
The date of the experiment is not set at this stage, however they are looking to conduct their experiment in the next two to four weeks.
If any members would like to take part or would like any more information please don't hesitate to email Georgia and Alex. The email address is:
g.jameson1@lancaster.ac.uk
Your participation would be highly appreciated.




17-10-16

At the end of a week which has seen Lancaster firing on all cylinders with the wonderful music festival, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

The term got off to a great start last Wednesday with a fabulous introduction to the subject of Magistracy, confidently presented by Deputy Chair of the Lancaster Bench, James Dickinson.

Jim contextualised Magistracy in a way that clarified the difference between two areas of the criminal justice system, Magistrates and Crown. We heard about the distinction between criminal and civil law and also adult and youth courts. This was a great introduction which set the scene for our next session. We followed the lecture with a vibrant and energetic Research & Discussion Forum where Jim took part and answered all our questions.

Next week…

This coming Wednesday (19th October 2016) we will have our next session with Jim. This will take the form of a ‘Mock Trial’. In this session, which takes place in Lancaster Magistrates Court (behind Lancaster Town Hall and across from Lancaster Police Station), we will have the chance to look at the form of a court case in the context of the court environment. Using a set script, we will create a case, which we will then be able to explore in detail until we are able to come to a verdict, based on the available evidence.

This is the perfect chance to look at Magistracy from the inside, and the session promises to be an exciting and unique experience. If you plan on joining us for this session, and we hope you will, feel free to bring a friend who might also enjoy it. We would like to thank Jim and his colleagues for making this session available. It will be, I’m sure, an excellent way for us to put ourselves in the shoes of the Magistrate/court room staff/accused and gain a better understanding of how the process of law operates in the UK. We hope to have a guided tour of the court building (circumstances permitting), and there will be plenty of chance to chat with Jim and get answers to any questions you may have.

We will gather in the Magistrates Court foyer at 12:55, where Jim will meet us and take us into the court.
Please bear in mind that the court building will be operating as it does on a daily basis, though the courtroom we will use has been reserved for us.

For more details of our upcoming Lunchtime Lectures and events, visit our website:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/home







07-10-16

Hello,

We start our new academic year this coming Wednesday (12th October 2016) in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 (as last year) from 1pm with an interesting lecture which will serve as our introduction to the fascinating subject of Magistracy given by James Dickinson, Deputy Chair of the Lancaster Bench, to begin our new term.

This is the first of our run of three Lunchtime lectures on this subject, which will take place over the coming weeks.

The timetable looks like this at present…

12th October 2016 - James Dickinson, Deputy Chair of the Lancaster Bench.
'Introduction to Magistracy'
James will give us a well-rounded introduction to the subject area.

19th October 2016 - James Dickinson, Deputy Chair of the Lancaster Bench.
'The Mock Trial'
Please note: this session will take place in Lancaster Magistrates Court.
This will be a chance to engage with the fascinating subject of Magistracy and help us to begin to appreciate the challenges faced when dealing with the justice system.

26th October 2016 - Dr Jude Towers, Lecturer in Sociology & Quantitative Methods, Lancaster University.
'The Politics of Counting: Is Violence Increasing or Decreasing in England and Wales?'
Jude will look at statistics in relation to violent crime, how they are gathered and used.

2nd November 2016 - James Dickinson, Deputy Chair of the Lancaster Bench.
'How Sentencing Works'
In this final session on the subject of Magistracy, Jim will look at sentencing and how it works in practice.

9th November 2016 - Janet Ross-Mills, Lancaster University CLG Steering Group & Age UK.
'Conclusions from the Advanced Planning Project'
In this session, Janet will look back over the ‘My Life, My Decision’ project which she has been involved with over the last couple of years.

Below I have include the usual introductory information, which you might wish to refresh yourself with in the run up to the new term. If you have friends who might benefit from knowing about us, please pass the information on to them. We love to have new attendees and everyone is welcome!

Enjoy the last of your summer/autumn break.
We hope to see you on the 12th!

Regards,

Dave
(on behalf of the CLG Steering Group)


......................................


Intro Pack…

Continuing Learning Group 2016/2017 Academic Year.

2016-2017 academic year begins on Wednesday 12th October 2016

Lunchtime Lectures will start at 1pm in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3.
The first part of the term will focus on Magistracy and the Politics of Crime Statistics.
(A minimum £1 donation is requested towards the operating costs, as we are a volunteer run group and receive no funding from the University)

Further information on Lunchtime Lectures can be found here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures



Research and Discussion Forum: This will again follow each Lunchtime Lecture and will encourage participatory discussion following on from the lecture or other topics of interest.
During the last academic year, this part of the programme proved to be extremely popular and well attended. We look forward to more vibrant discussion stimulated by the lectures, current affairs and forthcoming events.

Further information on the RDF can be found here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28G%29+Research+%26+Discussion+Forum



Open Lectures: Older learners may sit in on a selection of first year undergraduate lectures. The list of lectures can be found via link below.
This part of our programme provides the perfect opportunity for you to get a taste of contemporary undergraduate student education, and a solid background in your selected subject. If you are interested in attending any of the Open Lectures please email: seniorlearners@lancaster.ac.uk or telephone Nigel: (01524) 381783

Please note: There is a charge of £20 per subject for the academic year to cover university admin costs.

Full details of the Open Lectures we currently offer can be found here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28F%29+Open+Lecture+Scheme


Newsletter: We will continue to send out our weekly CLG News via email. If you have recently changed your email please let us know. If you have a friend who would benefit from being on our email list, please send us their email address and we will add them.


Website: Our website is proving to be hugely popular both locally and globally, receiving between 1,000 and 4,000 visitors every week! It's a great way to keep up to date with CLG news and developments.

Our website can be accessed here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/home


Accessibility: If anyone has any difficulties please contact us. (Contact details below)
Buses: 2/2A/3/3A/4/40/41/42 and others.
Car: Parking spaces are limited and charges apply.
Fylde College Lecture Theatre 3, is located on the South Spine, maps are available here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28L%29+Campus+Map+%26+Directions


Steering Group Members Are:
Nigel Cole
Zsuzsanna Brennan-Daly
Rita Gerrard
George Henson
David John Marshall
Dave Pedder
Janet Ross-Mills

If you have any questions, please feel free to approach any of the Steering Group members at the lecture or discussion forum. They are happy to help.


Contact Details:
Continuing Learning Group,
C4AR,
Rm C06,
Furness Building,
Lancaster University,
LA3 4YG

Email Us: seniorlearners@lancaster.ac.uk



27-09-16

Hello,

I hope you are well and enjoying the change going on around us as we move from summer into autumn.
The Continuing Learning Group is set to start again on Wednesday 12th October at 1pm in the usual venue of Fylde Lecture Theatre 3.

I would, at this point, like to draw your attention to this year’s selection of Open Lectures which are now confirmed. The full selection of lectures and lecture series outlines can be found at the bottom of this email. As you may know, The Open Lectures scheme was instigated by Professor Keith Percy in the Department of Continuing Education around 40 years ago. The scheme offer the chance for older learners to sit in on a number of first year undergraduate lectures which take place in and around the university. We in the CLG Steering Group feel it is an important and valuable link between the University and the people of Lancaster, Morecambe and surrounding district, so continue to champion the scheme and run it voluntarily. It has proved to be a popular part of the programme, benefitting senior learners, undergraduates and lecturers too.

This year we have, once again, managed to put together a broad selection of subjects such as Sociology, Law, Ethics and Biomedicine. We hope there is something for everybody!

There is a small charge of £20 for each lecture series you embark on, which goes to the department to cover their admin costs. However, this is a fair price when you take into account the cost to undergraduates to attend these lectures. There is also a protocol for older learners attending Open Lectures, this can be found here.
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28F%29+Open+Lecture+Scheme

If you feel you would like to attend one or more subjects on offer in the Open Lecture series, please call Steering Group member Nigel on (01524) 381783 or drop us a line at seniorlearners@lancaster.ac.uk


Other News…

A number of our members attended the Ageing and Security Conference which took place at Lancaster University over the summer, hosted by the Centre for Ageing Research.

Janet Ross-Mills reports back on the event…

‘The day began with a retired police officer telling us how he and his wife were attacked and robbed in their own home in the late afternoon. They were expecting the milkman and the two assailants stood one behind the other so that it looked like one person viewed through frosted glass and Mrs E. opened the door. It was a disturbing reminder to be vigilant and have a good view of your physical environment.
The speakers progressed through various aspects of crime involving technology and highlighted particular vulnerability in older people. This is partly due to ingrained attitudes of respect for institutions like banks and authorities, tendency to use second hand gadgets and inability to recognise signs that younger people might be more alert to.
The good news is that people of any age can learn these skills and with a growing number of cyber crimes being committed it is clear that we cannot rely on technology to protect us. We have to develop a sound understanding of the technology we are using and how we can protect ourselves.

Top tips from the day were:

*use strong passwords and change them from time to time. Do not use the same password for multiple accounts.

*shred documents and bills before putting them in the bin.

*change the default password on your router.

*never press the "No Thanks" buttons on unsolicited offers.

It is estimated that £35 billion is lost to mass marketing fraud in the UK annually. Don't be a victim. Improve your security and we at CLG will seek speakers on this area to address our group so that we will all be better protected in future. If you don't know the difference between phishing, pharming and phlopping you can look at Webepedia which explains the terminology used in the world of IT.

As always it was a superb day and we would like to thank Trevor Crawford and the Centre for Ageing Research for hosting the day.’


And Finally…

I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate Steering Group member Zsuzsanna Brenner, and long-standing friend and supporter of the CLG, Rory Daly on their recent marriage. The couple conducted a ceremony in Zsuzsanna’s home country of Hungary, and another here in the UK, so all family and friends could attend. We wish them a long and happy life together. Congratulations!

Thanks for your attention.
I will send out an introductory email to begin the new academic year, in the run up to the start of term.

Enjoy the rest of your break.

Regards,

Dave
(on behalf of the CLG Steering Group)




This year’s selection of Open Lectures is as follows…


LING 102
English Language
These lectures aim to introduce students to the English language – how to describe it, how it varies and how it functions in a variety of contexts. Students will not only study the traditional linguistic areas of English (e.g. lexis, grammar, phonetics), but also areas that are often overlooked (e.g. letters, spellings) and areas that have more recently come to the fore, such as pragmatics or conversation analysis.

Students will learn about linguistic frameworks in the analysis and explanation of variation in English, both present-day and, to a lesser extent, historical.



SOCL 101
Introduction to Sociology
These lectures aim to introduce you to sociological issues, ideas, concepts, evidence and argument by examining some key aspects of living in the contemporary world.

Students will be introduced to debates and issues related to various aspects of contemporary societies and encouraged to explore ideas and undertake analysis. In this respect, it is perhaps better to think of sociology as an interpretative scientific endeavour rather than producing definitive findings or laws, although it may do this too.



GWS 101
Introduction to Gender and Women’s studies
Gender and Women's Studies considers the kinds of power that women and men have developed, the forms of organisations and institutions in which they participate and the ways in which women have resisted marginalisation.

Students will be introduced to crucial categories of difference and forms of inequality such as race, gender, class, disability and sexuality and we will explore how gender identities are constructed.



PHIL 100
Introduction to Philosophy
How should we live? Is there a God? Are we free to act as we wish if everything is determined by prior causes? Why should we obey the law? Can science discover all the facts that can be known?

These are some of the many challenging questions students will engage with. We approach these questions through the history of Philosophy – studying figures such as Plato, Descartes, Kant and Nietzsche amongst others.



CREW 103
Creative Writing
These lectures aim to offer insight into issues such as plot construction, character development, and the use of poetic form. We also value the opportunity to expose students to writers talking about their practice.



POLI 100
Understanding Politics and Governance
These lectures aim to be accessible to those who have studied Politics before, but also to those who have not. They will provide an introduction and a foundation for future study.

Students are introduced to the principles, practice and institutions of ‘liberal democracy’, the foundations of the liberal state, liberty and democracy, and examine their meaning, value and compatibility.



EPR 100
Ethics, Philosophy and Religion
What is the meaning of life? What does it mean to be human? What do we owe to other people? How can we understand our relationship with the divine? What does it mean to talk about the divine or the infinite? Can we have decent and meaningful human relationships without the presence of something greater? Are these questions universal, or culturally specific?

These lectures aim to offer students the knowledge and skills to approach fundamental questions about the meaning of life and the human condition with confidence and, crucially, to consider what is at stake in ethical reasoning with self-assurance and maturity.
The perspectives offered include the philosophical, theological, religious, western, Asian, the cross-cultural, ancient and modern.



RST 100
World Religions
These lectures aim to provide an outline of the growth and development of the world’s major religious traditions, their primary characteristics, and subsequently consider some of the various forms they take in the contemporary world.

The lectures aim to reflect on four religious traditions – Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Islam. They will set each religion in context and set out the varieties of its beliefs. Students will explore religious ethics and practice, and examine some of the contemporary issues facing these religions today.



BIOL 133
Ethics and Biomedicine
These lectures are suitable for those with a broad interest in the biochemical processes of life and how these are altered by disease. We have extensive links with local hospitals, both in research activities and in the teaching on our biomedical-based courses.

These lectures are designed to provide students with a broad overview of subject disciplines and includes Molecules of Life, Biomedicine and Society, Organic Chemistry, and Anatomy and Tissue Structure.



BIOL 135
Introduction to Epidemiology: Global Health and Disease
These lectures aim to give students a basic understanding of some of the key concepts and debates within epidemiology, including the methodological approaches used to measure health, illness and disease in human populations.
Students are given the tools to develop an awareness of the processes of demographic transition and global ageing and a broad understanding of the effects of climate change on health.



LAW 103 R
Law of Torts
These lectures introduce students to the law of torts, covering topics such as negligence, trespass, nuisance, Rylands v Fletcher, breach of statutory duty, defamation and privacy. Students will engage with theoretical perspectives and academic critique as well as the substantive law in order to gain an informed and critical overview of the subject.



LAW 264
Lawyers and Society
The legal profession and legal services are currently experiencing major changes as a result of commercialisation, inter and intra professional competition, globalisation, the culture of human rights, pressure to improve access to justice, the intensification of conflicts of interest, the impact of information technology, the changing character of legal work, and the growing number of lawyers who were long excluded - women and racial minorities.

These lectures aim to provide a critical examination of the development, current state and likely future shape of the legal profession.



LAW 240
Family Law
These lectures aim to introduce students to a collection of laws as they impact upon the family as a unit and upon the individuals within a familial group. They seek to inform students to develop a critical approach to the law in this area, and to take law as an object of study and examine how family relationships are understood in that context.



LAW 343
Health Care Law and Ethics
These lectures aim to introduce students to the underlying conceptual framework and basic principles of health care law. Students may then utilise their understanding of these foundational issues through exploring specific and complex areas of health care law and practice, from a medico-legal and ethical perspective. The chosen areas will reflect current medical advances and the developing nature of medical and ethical practice.



LEC 103
Environmental Processes and Systems
These lectures aim to provide an introduction to environmental processes and their impacts at a range of spatial scales and in a variety of environments.

Key themes include the study of global climate and associated environmental change, Earth surface materials and the flows which produce distinctive and dynamic landscape forms, and the processes which influence the development of soils and associated ecosystems at the land surface.



LEC 172
Geological Processes
These lectures aim to convey why it is important for scientists, whatever their discipline, to have a basic understanding of geological processes.

Emphasis is placed on the dynamic way in which the Earth works. Geological processes explored include: formation of minerals, volcanism, metamorphism, sedimentation and deformation.




19-06-16

Hello,

As we enter the final week of this academic year for the CLG (therefore, successfully completing 10 full years of the senior education programme at Lancaster University. Hurrah!), we look back at last week’s lecture, look forward to next week’s and reflect on what we have achieved.


Last week…

Last Wednesday Jim Dickinson, Deputy Chair of the Lancaster Bench, presented his lecture on
'The History of the Magistracy'.

As I mentioned previously, this lecture signifies the beginning of a series of sessions which will take place next academic year on the subject of Magistracy and how it works in practice. In this first session, James set the scene with an accessible history of Magistracy in this country.

Starting in October, we will have a comprehensive introduction to the fascinating theme of magistracy, followed by a mock trial which we can take part in. Lastly we will have a session on how sentencing works after a guilty verdict is reached. It is a great privileges to have Jim run these sessions for the CLG and we look forward to gaining a much better understanding of the subject as a result.


Next week…

Our final Lunchtime Lecture of this term, which takes place this coming Wednesday (22nd June 2016) will be given by Professor Christine Milligan. The subject will be ‘Care, Coping and Identity: older men’s experiences of spousal care-giving’.

In this lecture, Christine (who is the Director of the Centre for Ageing Research - our home in Lancaster University, and a good friend to the CLG), will explore an often overlooked area of research, that of older men's experiences of spousal care giving. We are very pleased to welcome Christine to present the ultimate lecture of this term and academic year.

Please note, this final lecture will take place in Furness Lecture Theatre 3 (above Pizzetta Republic) at the usual time, 1pm.

We will follow Christine's lecture with a Jacob's Join (in the same room), where attendees are invited to bring food and drink to celebrate the end of this academic year.

Christine's lecture also marks the completion of 10 years of the senior education programme at Lancaster University. The Senior Learners Programme, started by Fiona Frank and Keith Percy of the Continuing Education Department, began in 2006 and had many of the same members who constitute the CLG, including attendees and Steering Group members. We have seen the senior education programme change over the years from a funded series of lectures and workshops put on by Lancaster University, to a self-supporting programme of lectures, discussions and research projects run by the group members themselves and backed by a successful website, regularly visited by learners all over the world.

We have experienced lots of changes and faced many challenges over the past ten years, but have worked hard to keep the programme dynamic and relevant despite a harsh recession and numerous changes of focus for British university education as a whole. We have not only survived against the odds, we have flourished. This is a great achievement and something we’re extremely proud of. We are eternally grateful to those who have joined us on this journey, in whatever capacity (departmental staff, volunteers, lecturers, researchers, students, retired people, visitors to Lancaster, visiting organisation members, family and friends). We also fondly remember those we have lost along the way. Most of all we look forward to continuing onwards in the spirit to which we are accustomed.

We begin the 11th year of a Senior Education Programme at Lancaster University in October 2016 and hope you will come along with us and enjoy the ride.

Lastly…

I would like to bring your attention to a couple of future events which you might want to be involved in…

The Centre for Ageing Research are running a seminar/webinar on Thursday 23rd June 2016 from 2pm till 6pm in Furness Lecture Theatre 1. The subject is ‘Non-Drug Treatments to Intervene and Prevent Dementia’.

Attendees to this event will hear from practitioners, clinicians and researchers specializing in a range of therapeutic approaches to memory and cognitive health in ageing.

Topics will include nutritional medicine, Ayurvedic nutrition, hypnotherapy, glucose and cognition, MCTs, cognitive activation, culinary medicine, nature and horticulture.

Exploring the research evidence for holistic non-drug interventions.
Encouraging business, therapists & practitioners to provide such options.
Engaging local people with memory problems in research on outcomes.

Places are free but limited so booking is recommended. Contact Jan Lyons (jan.lyons@lancaster.ac.uk) to book a place.

For more information and instructions for joining the webinar online:
http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/fhm/research/centre-for-ageing-research/#newsampevents


And…


Hearing and Ageing…

As we age our ability to understand speech often gets worse, especially in noisy environments. Sometimes this happens even though routine audiological tests turn out to be fine.

The causes of these age-related hearing difficulties in the absence of a clinical hearing loss are not fully understood. These hearing difficulties may be due to a partial loss of the nerve fibers responsible for transmitting sound signals, or to subtle changes occurring to these nerve fibers.

We are conducting an experiment that aims to clarify the causes of age-related hearing difficulties. This is a fundamental step towards developing early diagnosis and treatment of age-related hearing difficulties. We’re conducting an experiment that aims to clarify the causes of age-related hearing difficulties. A more in depth summary of this research project is provided here. Detail about the experiment for people interested in participating are provided below.


The Experiment…

The experiment consists of a battery of auditory, electrophysiological, and cognitive tests. These include:

– Discrimination and identification of speech and non-speech sounds presented through headphones (e.g. detecting which of two sounds has a higher pitch, or identifying a word in a noisy background).

– Tests of cognitive performance (e.g. ability to memorize sequences of digits of increasing length).

– Recordings of electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to sounds. EEG recordings measure the tiny currents generated by the brain through of electrodes placed on the scalp.


Take part in the experiment…

We’re looking for participants between the ages of 30-60 and 60-90 years. People who are not native British English speakers, or who have been diagnosed with a hearing loss at low frequencies (at or below 4000 Hz) cannot take part in the study.
The test battery takes between five and six two-hour sessions to complete. Participants will be compensated £7 per hour for their time.
The tests take place in the hearing lab at Lancaster University. Testing sessions will be arranged at dates and times that best suit each participant.

Please, do not hesitate to contact us if you would like to have further information, or would like to take part in the experiment. Contact information is provided below:

email: s.carcagno@lancaster.ac.uk
Telephone: 01524 594305
Room D40 in Fylde College,
Department of Psychology,
Lancaster University,
Lancaster, LA1 4YF


Thanks for your attention,
Have a wonderful summer break and we look forward to your company next academic year.
Best wishes for myself and the whole Steering Group!

Dave

(on behalf of the CLG Steering Group)




12-06-16

At the end of a week which has seen the EU ‘Remain’ and ‘Leave’ campaigns reportedly neck and neck, major blood cancer identified as 11 distinct diseases, and the Queen celebrate her official 90th birthday, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, Lucia Marquart, Environment and Community Projects Team Member with Lancashire County Council, presented her Lunchtime Lecture 'Beyond the Castle'.

In the lecture, Lucia discussed the recent archaeological exploratory digs which have taken place in the grounds of the Castle and Priory here in Lancaster. She spoke of the discovery of substantial walls, which indicate the existence of an important shore fort going back to the late Roman period, and also the recently uncovered well which promises to hold further important findings, if and when more extensive explorations are carried out. Lucia also looked at how the 'Beyond the Castle' project is working towards further digs and she examined the challenges that must be faced in a project of this sort taking place at this time.

The session was then followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees were able to discuss the exciting prospects for the future of Lancaster Castle.

This was an informative session, full of positive ideas and plans for Lancaster’s future as a Heritage town. I intend to post the audio recording of the session online over the next week or so:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


Next week…


This coming Wednesday (15th June 2016) James Dickinson, Deputy Chair of the Lancaster Bench, will present his Lunchtime Lecture on 'History of the Magistracy’.


This lecture sets the scene for a series of sessions which will take place next academic year on the subject of Magistracy and how it works in practice. In this session, James begins with a fascinating history of Magistracy.



James’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will have plenty of chance to discuss the lecture content. The lecture will run from 1pm in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3. The Research & Discussion Forum will follow around 2.30pm in the same room.


Next academic year (October 2016) we will have three sessions in the same vein, also by James:


Firstly, we intend to have James start the new academic year with an introduction to Magistracy as it stands in the 21st Century.


The second session will take the form of a mock trial, where attendees will get the chance to take part in a trial, including deliberating in light of the evidence.


The final of the three sessions will focus on sentencing, how it works in practice and what constitute the relevant details when sentencing is carried out.


We hope you will be able to join us for all of the sessions. However, if you can only make one or two, don't worry, that’s fine. They will be interesting, fun and highly educational.



05-06-16

At the end of a week which has seen the deadline approach for registration for voting in the EU referendum, the appearance of the plastic £5 note end three centuries of paper money, and much of England experience a welcome heat wave to benefit gardens and allotments, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.



Last week…

Last Wednesday, PhD student Abigail Oyston, presented her Lunchtime Lecture 'Bodies of Value: Examining Infanticide in Victorian Discourses'.

The lecture examined representations of infanticide in Victorian discourses in order to understand the different ways in which babies were valued. Abigail used the term “bodies of value” not only in relation to the body of the dead baby, but also in reference to the implicit social, historical, and cultural value of the texts examined. Abigail juxtaposed medical journal articles, newspaper reports, and fiction to gain a broader understanding of the social and cultural values associated with murdered babies. She considered how factors relating to the baby, the mother, and the writer, such as religion, social class, law, and illegitimacy, affect both the type and the amount of value attached to babies during their brief existence and upon their unnatural deaths. Through close analysis of the discourses, Abigail demonstrated that the act of infanticide can and does reveal a range of values attached to the dead baby, including cultural, political and financial values.

Though in many ways challenging, Abigail’s lecture was extremely engaging and informative regarding the Victorian view of infanticide and infant death. We then followed on from Abigail’s lecture with the Research & Discussion Forum where we looked at the issues raised in the lecture and discussed them in more detail. We wish Abigail the very best with her PhD, and thank her for sharing her excellent research with us.



Next week…

This coming Wednesday (8th June 2016) Lucia Marquart, Environment and Community Projects Team Member with Lancashire County Council, will present here Lunchtime Lecture 'Beyond the Castle'.

In this lecture, Lucia will discuss the recent archaeological exploratory digs which have taken place in the grounds of the Castle/Priory. This is a fascinating time in terms of archeology in Lancaster. She will also look at how the 'Beyond the Castle' project is working towards further digs and a bright future for the Castle and, in turn, Lancaster City as a whole.

This session will then be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get the chance to discuss the exciting prospects for the future of Lancaster Castle.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

For more information on forthcoming lectures, try our main website:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

Best wishes, enjoy the sun!





29-05-16

At the end of a week which has seen London Mayor Sadiq Khan slam foreign investors for leaving large numbers of London homes empty, and temperatures in parts of the UK reach a soaring 22 degrees centigrade as Chelsea hosts the 2016 Flower Show, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday Abigail Edmunds, PhD student with the English and Creative Writing Department here at Lancaster University, gave her Lunchtime Lecture 'Revisiting Charles Kingsley's The Water Babies'.

Primarily a scholar of Thomas Miller, in this lecture Abigail spoke at length on Kingsley’s The Water Babies. Abigail explored the material with particular attention paid to the class issues contained therein. She looked at the radical nature of the writing (in the context of the time) and the group were able to gain a better understanding of the Victorian mind set around class constraints.

Abigail then kindly stayed around to take part in the Research & Discussion Forum, where we were able to explore the finer points of the story.

We would like to wish Abigail good luck with her PhD on Thomas Miller and hope she will return to talk with us again, with a focus on his work, when here PhD thesis is complete and submitted.

I will upload the audio recording of the lecture to the website over the coming week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


This week…

This coming Wednesday (1st June 2016), continuing our Victorian Literature theme, Abigail Oyston, PhD Student with the Department of English and Creative Writing at Lancaster University, will present her Lunchtime Lecture 'Bodies of Value: Examining Infanticide in Victorian Discourses'.

This lecture examines representations of infanticide in Victorian discourses in order to understand the different ways in which babies were valued. Abigail uses the term “bodies of value” not only in relation to the body of the dead baby, but also in reference to the implicit social, historical, and cultural value of the texts examined. Abigail juxtaposes medical journal articles, newspaper reports, and fiction to gain a broader understanding of the social and cultural values associated with murdered babies.

In her own words…

“I consider how factors relating to the baby, the mother, and the writer, such as religion, social class, law, and illegitimacy, affect both the type and the amount of value attached to babies during their brief existence and upon their unnatural deaths. Through close analysis of the discourses, I demonstrate that the act of infanticide can and does reveal a range of values attached to the dead baby, including cultural, political and financial values.”

This promises to be a very thought provoking lecture and there will be plenty of chance to discuss the content further in the Research & Discussion Forum, which will follow.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

We look forward to your company.


22-05-16

At the end of a week which has seen Tory rebels and Jeremy Corbyn form an unlikely alliance to protect the NHS from transatlantic trade deal, the announcement that tuition fees are to rise above the £9,000 cap, and the BBC announce it is to drop 11,000 recipes from the food section of its website in a bid to save money, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, Professor Kamilla Elliot, Prof of Literature and Media, English and Creative Writing here at Lancaster University gave her lecture, 'Victorian Literature and Film'.

Unfortunately, due to a technical issue beyond our control, Kamilla was unable to run her video material with audio. However, despite this hitch, Kamilla was very professional and presented us with a very thought provoking lecture on the work of Dickens, with particular focus on the TV/film representations of his work. Kamilla explored media from different time periods as well as different formats (film/animation), as she highlighted the changes in story and characterisation which have taken place in the screening of Dicken’s work.

I’d like to apologise to group members for the technical hitch on behalf of the CLG, Fylde College and the University. I hope that this didn’t spoil your experience. I’m pleased to say that, judging from the attendees engagement with the subject, most people seem to have got plenty out of the session.

The lecture was then followed by the Research & Discussion Forum. This gave everyone a chance to discuss Dicken’s work in general, its strengths and weaknesses.

We also had our AGM where we voted in our committee members for the next 12 months. Thanks to all who took part in this process.

Next week…

This coming Wednesday (25th May 2016) Abigail Edmunds, PhD student with the English and Creative Writing Dept. Lancaster University, will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'The Writings of the Victorian Working-Class Children's Author, Thomas Miller'.

“I am a Victorianist through and through (even though it’s not very trendy these days) and a PHD student with a project focusing on class and Victorian children’s literature, particularly the relationship between middle-class authored texts for children and working-class authored texts for children. The project has led to me focusing specifically on the works of the prolific working-class author Thomas Miller (1807-74). My initial undergraduate studies took me to Leeds (back in the day) before moving to Lancaster to undertake Masters and PHD studies. Something of an academic magpie by nature, my other academic interests include mechanisation in literature, early cyborgs and working- class juvenilia. I have in the past given papers on ‘Programmed femininity’ in late Victorian Science Fiction and the cultural etymology of Trolling. This latest magpie enterprise sees me revisiting Charles Kingsley’s The Water Babies alongside a consideration of modern and Neo Victorian equivalents.”

Abigail’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will be able to continue the discussion around the themes of the lecture.



15-05-16


At the end of a week which has seen proceedings get underway into possible financial irregularities in the election campaign, thousands evacuated when a 500lb ww2 bomb was found in Bath, and a 32ft high doorway in the form of a bare backside in the running for this year’s Turner prize, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, to mark Dying Matters Awareness Week, we had a session on DIY funerals given by Gail Capstick. Gail gave us a lot of information around alternatives to the usual, mainstream funeral. Gail looked at alternative caskets, as well as alternative options for ceremonies. This was a useful session which opened up a lot of possibilities that most of us were totally unaware of.

Gail’s session was followed by a session given by Janet Ross and Esther Nimmo. The session looked at the concept of pre-planning for end of life, with particular attention to refusal of treatment and the new online form which allows us all to make certain decisions at this stage which will, hopefully, benefit us later on. This is an aspect of forward planning which, as life expectancy has increased, has become an important, if controversial, issue.

Both sessions were extremely interesting and informative. I would like to thank all those involved for their excellent contributions. I will upload these to the website over the next few days:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (18th May 2016) Professor Kamilla Elliot, Professor of Literature and Media with the English and Creative Writing Department at Lancaster University will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Victorian Literature and Film'.

Kamila grew up in the UK, moving to the US after A levels. She received her B.A. in Mass Communications and Theatre from the University of Colorado in 1980 and pursued postgraduate studies in film at Boston University from 1981-82. After working in elder care and health research, she returned to academia in 1989, earning an A.L.M. degree through Harvard's adult education programme in 1991. From there, she entered Harvard University, where she completed a Ph.D. in English and American Literature and Language in 1996. She taught Victorian studies and interdisciplinary literature/film studies at the University of California at Berkeley from 1996-2004. During that time she published research on literature and film, including Rethinking the Novel/Film Debate (Cambridge UP, 2003).

Following on from Kamilla’s lecture, we will have the Research & Discussion Forum, which will give group members a chance to continue further with themes raised during the lecture.

For further information on forthcoming lectures, why not visit our main website:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

We hope you can join us,



08-05-16

At the end of a week that has seen British voters go to the polls to elect local government, City Mayors and Police & Crime Commissioners, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last week Professor Stephen Wildman, Director of the Ruskin Library and Research Centre here at Lancaster University presented his Lunchtime Lecture, 'John Ruskin: His Life in Pictures'.

Stephen spoke on the life and times of John Ruskin, touching on the social theory which, through his writings, made him such a compelling and charismatic character to Victorian society. Stephen used a range of images to outline the main events and concerns in Ruskin’s life. Particular emphasis was placed on his connections with other influential artists such as Turner and the Pre-Raphaelites.

If you have not visited the Ruskin Library/ Research Centre here on campus, I would highly recommend it. The Centre is open daily and admission to the exhibition space is free. The current exhibition, 'Power of the Hills: Ruskin’s Mountains', runs till 23rd September 2016.

I will post the audio recording of Stephen’s lecture later in the week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

Next week…

This coming Wednesday (11th May 2016) as part of ‘Dying Matters Week’, Gail Capstick, Director of LESS will present her Lunchtime Lecture 'Sustainable Approaches to Funerals'.

Gail has a background in teaching and housing. She worked for 14 years as a business studies teacher, ten of which were as head of department. She worked in universities for two and a half years, teaching for a year and setting up a service user and carer project.

Gail is a member of some voluntary groups in the area. With a number of others and an academic from Lancaster University a Peer Education group was formed which began to look at expressing wishes and preferences for end of life. The group produced a document to be used in planning for wishes and preferences in end of life. Workshops were done with members of the public and professionals talking about the contents of the portfolio and a presentation was done at a PCT conference. The portfolio document has been well received.

The group also ran six afternoon workshops connected with aspects of death and dying and preparation for end of life. The work of the group has been the subject of an academic paper by Katherine Froggatt at the University of Lancaster and a chapter in a book.

Whilst the group has not been active in this type of work for a while Gail has continued to work with others in respect to practices around death and dying in particular areas, two of these being the financial costs of bereavement and the other the environmental costs of bereavement.

In this lecture, Gail will focus on these areas and will question some of the funeral practices common in this country and how people can, if they wish, arrange things differently either for their own funeral or that of others, without incurring such financial cost to themselves or to the environment.


Gail’s lecture will be followed by a Research & Discussion Forum led by group member Janet Ross, who will run an advanced planning demo. For those of us who feel it important to make our decisions and put our plans in place now for the end of our life, this is an ideal opportunity to look at what is possible and how we might all take some control, giving us peace of mind.


Other news…

Dying Matter Week sees a number of interesting events taking place such as:

Radio Lancashire will Interview CLG group member Janet Ross on Monday 9th May at 7.25am.
They are also planning to do an item each day in the breakfast programme and the drive time slots.

Tuesday 10th May 10-4. The International Observatory on End of Life Care are running a Shop front event in St Nicolas Arcade with a display of materials and ideas for getting conversations going and expressing wishes about End of Life care and treatment.

Wednesday 11th May is our CLG lecture and advanced planning demonstration as outlined above.

Thursday 12th May Reverend Ian Dewar, Chaplain at Lancaster Hospital, is running a Death Cafe 10-12 at Storey Institute.

Thursday 12th May at the Friends Meeting House in Lancaster, there is an event concerning ‘Financial Costs of Bereavement’. Speakers include a solicitor, a Quaker campaigner and representative from the Transition City Group.

Friday 13th May 2-4, Lancaster and Morecambe U3A are hosting a Special Lecture:
‘What does the mental capacity Act mean for you?’ this event will also include an Introduction to Advance Panning with Janet Ross.

See the Dying Matters Website for details and further information:
http://www.dyingmatters.org/



01-05-16

At the end of a week which has seen reports claiming that both sides of the EU referendum debate are neck and neck, the Hillsborough enquiry come to an end after 27 years, and the media question whether the new Dyson Supersonic hairdryer is really a haircare revolution, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday Dr. Mary Turner spoke on the subject of palliative care in prisons. As life expectancy becomes greater, and later life illnesses such as dementia become more of an issue, we are faced with the need for palliative care in many settings, including prisons. Mary's research expertise is in palliative and end of life care, and for the past 7 years she has undertaken research in a range of care settings. In her lecture, Mary explored the research she has undertaken in this area, exploring the challenges this poses to the prison system, the health service and more.

We then followed the lecture with a Research & Discussion Forum where we were able to discuss such issues in greater detail. This proved to be an interesting area of research, which many of us had not given much thought to before.

Next week…

This coming Wednesday (4th May 2016) Professor Stephen Wildman, Director of the Ruskin Library and Research Centre here at Lancaster University, will present his Lunchtime Lecture, 'John Ruskin: His Life in Pictures'.

Many of you will now know Stephen from previous lectures he has given to the group and also from his guided tours of exhibitions at the Ruskin Library. In this lecture, Stephen will use less familiar, along with well-known, images to outline the main events and concerns in Ruskin’s life, with particular emphasis on his connections with artists such as Turner and the Pre-Raphaelites. His own drawings will include several from the collection held in the Ruskin Library.

We are very grateful to Stephen for his continued support for our programme, and we welcome him back to talk with us about further aspects of Ruskin's work. If you have not visited the Ruskin Library/ Research Centre (the white, oval building by the roundabout on campus) I would highly recommend it.
The staff present 3 exhibitions per year, one per term, and the quality of the exhibitions is very high. Focus is on the work of Ruskin, his contemporaries and recent artists who are strongly influenced by his artwork, theories and writings. The Centre is open daily and admission to the exhibition space is free.

For more information, visit their website:
http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/users/ruskinlib/

Following on from the lecture, there will be plenty of chance to further discuss the content in the Research & Discussion Forum.


Other news…

Our Annual General Meeting is coming up soon. It will take place on Wednesday 18th May at 2:30 (between the lecture and the discussion). All CLG group members and lecture/discussion attendees are welcome to attend.

To mark Dying Matters Week, Transition City Lancaster will host a talk…

Dying Matters: The Financial Costs of Bereavement
May 12 @ 1:30 pm - 4:00 pm
Friends Meeting House
Meeting House Lane, Lancaster, LA1 1TX

Gary Rycroft, a local solicitor at Joseph A Jones and Co. will present information about the financial costs of bereavement.

Heather Kennedy of Quaker Social Action will speak about the Fair Funerals Campaign which aims to influence government and industry policy and raise public awareness. Heather will also give information about Down to Earth, a practical advice project for people on low incomes struggling with funeral costs.

Gail Capstick of Transition City Lancaster will present information as to local costs and different choices that can be made by those wishing to plan a funeral in the local area. Information will be available with details of useful websites and telephone numbers.

For more information, please visit their website:
http://transitioncitylancaster.org/event/dying-matters-the-financial-costs-of-bereavement/


24-04-16


At the end of a week which has seen the Queen celebrate her 90th birthday, the UK say goodbye to one of our finest comedians, Victoria Wood, and the world say goodbye to one of our finest contemporary musicians, Prince, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday , Dr Penny Foulds, Research Fellow with the Faculty of Health and Medicine here at Lancaster University, presented her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Defying Dementia: Compound to Clinic'.

Penny, who recently founded the ‘Defying Dementia’ campaign to raise funds and awareness of research into neurodegenerative diseases, discussed her current research with particular focus on the new compound which Lancaster University has developed to deal with dementia. Penny expertly described the workings of the potential new drug, and how it is able to prevent dementia from taking hold. This was a great opening lecture for the term which provided us with a positive glimpse into the future.

The lecture was then followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where group members were able to continue exploring themes that were raised in the lecture.


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (27th April 2016) Dr Mary Turner, Research Fellow with the International Observatory of End of Life Care here at Lancaster University will give her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Caring for End of Lifers: Palliative Care in a Prison Environment'.

Mary’s main interest is in palliative care in prisons and in how equitable care can be provided in this marginalised setting. Older prisoners are the fastest growing section of the prison population, and increasing numbers of prisoners with disabilities and life-limiting conditions are requiring palliative care. Prison staff face particular challenges in delivering round the clock care, managing symptoms and supporting family members in a setting where security is of paramount importance. Mary will explore these themes during the lecture.

Mary’s lecture will then be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get the chance to explore the themes further.


Other news…

I would like to inform you of a Ruskin seminar which is taking place next month…

‘No Wealth But Life’
Andrew Hill (Financial Times, Ruskin Foundation)
5th May, 5pm-6.30pm, Bowland North Seminar Room.
Including wine reception.
Enquiries: Jen Shepherd, Ruskin Library – j.m.shepherd@lancaster.ac.uk




17-04-16


Hello,

I hope you've had a good break over the Easter period and are as excited as we in the Steering Group are to start the new term.

This term starts on Wednesday 20th April 2016 for the Continuing Learning Group and the main lecture themes are life sciences, history and sustainability.

Our first Lunchtime Lecture will be given by Dr Penny Foulds, Research Fellow with the Faculty of Health and Medicine here at Lancaster University. The subject will be: 'Defying Dementia: Compound to Clinic'.

You may recall Penny from lectures she has given in the past, the last one being around 5 years ago. Penny recently founded the ‘Defying Dementia’ campaign, to raise funds and awareness of research into neurodegenerative diseases at Lancaster University, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Motor Neurone Disease. In this opening lecture of the summer term, Penny will discuss her current research and how we can all play our part towards creating a more positive future in terms of dementia.

We will follow Penny’s lecture with a Research & Discussion Forum. This part of the afternoon gives all attendees a chance to look further into the subject and explore points raised during the lecture. This is a chance to work with what you have learned and to apply that learning towards a better understanding of the subject matter. It is also a very sociable part of our day when we are able to get to know each other better.

The Lunchtime Lecture will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm (as last term) and will be followed in the same room by the Research & Discussion Forum, which will run till around 3.45pm.

For further details of lectures this term, visit our website:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

Thanks for your attention. We look forward to your company.

Best wishes.

Dave

(on behalf of the CLG Steering Group)


13-03-16

Hello,

At the end of a week which has seen the British Government begin to devour itself in relation to Europe, the world’s biggest dog show, Crufts, celebrate its 125th anniversary and the nation breathe a sigh of relief at the news that ginger nut biscuits are returning to our shops after the disruption of the floods, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last Week…

Last Wednesday, Feranita Feranita, a PhD student with Lancaster University Management School spoke to us about 'Challenges of Forming International Research & Development Alliances'.

Feranita focused on a unique programme: the Lancaster China Catalyst Programme (LCCP). This is a 2-year stage-based programme run by Lancaster University that aims at helping UK small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to set up research & development alliances with Chinese organisations. Using the research & development alliances created by 6 of the UK companies with their Chinese partners participating to the programme as case studies, Feranita uncovered the challenges that UK SMEs face at the initial formation stage with Chinese organisations including lack of understanding of the legal system, intellectual property protection issues, language and cultural differences.

After the lecture we took part in the Research & Discussion Forum. This was a great chance for us to look at the many and varied issues raised during Feranita’s talk. Particular focus was given to the cultural differences and the changing status regarding intellectual property issues.


Next Week…

This coming Wednesday (16th March 2016) Dr Vittorio Tantucci, Lecturer with the Department of Linguistics and English Language will present his Lunchtime Lecture on the 'Chinese Philosophy of Time'.

Many aspects of Vittorio's research are centred on Mandarin Chinese and other Sinitic languages addressed from a typological or intercultural-pragmatic point of view.

The lecture will then be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where we will have a chance to discuss further the issues raised and reflect on this academic term as a whole.

This lecture marks the last of our 3 Lunchtime Lectures focused on Chinese culture and philosophy and our final Lunchtime Lecture of this Lent term. I’m sure you’ll agree, it has been a particularly fascinating series of lectures, offering great insights into both local and international issues.

We in the Steering Group, would like to thank you for taking part this term, to whatever degree you have taken part. All interest has been appreciated (great and small) and it has been a pleasure presenting such thought-provoking sessions.

The Research & Discussion Forum has also been very stimulating recently. Many thanks to all who have contributed to those.

As we have mentioned previously, three of our Steering Group members are leaving this academic year and we are looking for new volunteers so, if you feel you would like to get involved in the planning and presenting of the programme, please do not hesitate to drop us a line at seniorlearners@lancaster.ac.uk.

We return to start the new term on Wednesday 20th April 2016 and lectures will focus on Life-Sciences, History and Economics. I will be adding details to the website over the coming weeks so please take a look:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

Have a good break over the Easter period.
We look forward to your involvement in the new term.

Best wishes,

Dave & the whole CLG Steering Group


06-03-16

At the end of a week when we celebrated Mother’s Day across the country, Storm Jake brought snow and gales to the North of England and Fourteen men were convicted for a series of raids on British museums in which they attempted to steal precious Chinese and rhino horn artefacts, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last Week…

Last Wednesday Professor Sarah Zhang visited us from the Lancaster Confucius Centre to tell us about the cultural background of the Chinese language. We were able to see just how the written language has evolved from its earliest days around five and a half thousand years ago. We were introduced to the very earliest recorded script, known as Oracle Bone Script and were able to compare it to the script in common usage today. We learned how similar these scripts are despite being thousands of years apart. We also learned how the Chinese dialects, though quite different when spoken, are the same in written form. We were fully able to appreciate the ideogrammatic nature of the language and discussed that challenges of operating such a complex language in the digital world.

If you would like to hear the lecture, I will be posting it online over the coming week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

We then followed on from the lecture with a Research & Discussion Forum, where we were able to discuss issues raised in this fascinating lecture and built on them.

Next Week…


This coming Wednesday (9th March 2016) Feranita Feranita of Lancaster University Management School will present her Lunchtime Lecture, 'Challenges of Forming International Research & Development Alliances'.

Born in Indonesia, educated in Taiwan, Singapore, Indonesia, Canada, and Spain, Feranita is currently pursuing her PhD degree at Lancaster University. In this lecture she will focus on a unique programme: the Lancaster China Catalyst Programme (LCCP). LCCP is a 2-year stage-based programme run by Lancaster University that aims at helping UK SMEs (small and medium-sized enterprises) to set up and develop research & development alliances with Chinese organisations. Using the programme as a research setting and the alliances created by 6 of the UK companies with their Chinese partners participating to the programme as case studies, Feranita seeks to uncover the challenges that UK SMEs face at the initial formation stage of research & development alliance with Chinese organisations. In general, the challenges identified by existing research on forming research & development alliances in China include lack of understanding the legal system, IP protection issue, language, and cultural differences.

Feranita’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get plenty of chance to discuss further the issues raised in the lecture.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

We hope you can join us!


28-02-16


At the end of a week that has seen more than half of England's acute care trusts claim they should get the same tax relief as charities, a London woman sue a pub for £4.2m after tripping over a rope in its beer garden, and the lines drawn between the stayers and the leavers for the forthcoming EU referendum, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last Week…

Last Wednesday, we were visited by two representatives from Costain who told us all about the new M6-Heysham link road, which is currently under construction. We heard about the various challenges which have been addressed throughout the project, from construction difficulties to wildlife concerns via aesthetic requirements. This project is having a big impact on all residents and visitors in the Lancaster, Morecambe and Heysham area and will no doubt change the way we live our lives. The talk attracted a large number of attendees who eagerly listened. Concerns were voiced and hopes for the future were discussed. Costain hope to have the road open by the summer of this year.

I will post some video material about the project online over the coming week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

Following the road talk, we used the Research & Discussion Forum slot to discuss the future of the CLG programme. As I mentioned last week, we are losing three steering group members this year so are looking for more people to get involved in the organizational side of the programme. This can be in any number of ways, from minute taking to securing lecturers for future Lunchtime Lectures. All offers of help are appreciated. As you know we are a volunteer group who rely on our members to make things happen. So, if you would like to join our 6 strong team and contribute something towards the process, however large or small, please drop us a line. WE are always pleased to welcome new Steering Group members.


Next Week…

This coming Wednesday (2nd March 2016) Prof Sarah Zhang, Chinese Director of the Lancaster Confucius Institute and Professor of South China University of Technology, will present her Lunchtime Lecture ‘Cultural Background of the Chinese Language’.

Professor Sarah Fengchun Zhang is from Lancaster's partner University, South China University of Technology. She received her Master’s degree there in applied linguistics. Her research interests are teaching English as a second language, testing, translation and textbook compilation. As editor or associate editor she has compiled 4 dictionaries, 20 textbooks for college students and hosted a couple of research projects on testing and English language teaching in her home University. She has published over 5 papers on translation and cross-cultural communication.

She loves teaching and culture. As the co-director of Lancaster University Confucius Institute (LUCI), she is dedicating herself to the Institute’s programmes of Mandarin teaching and culture exchange.

Sarah’s lecture will be followed by the Research and discussion forum where attendees will be able to explore further the themes of the lecture.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

For more information on this and other coming lectures, please visit our website:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures



Other News…

Lancaster Royal Institute of Philosophy will present a number of short talks and discussions during March. They take place in the Gallery at the Dukes Theatre, Moor Lane, Lancaster.
These are free events and all are welcome.

Thursday 3rd March, 7-8pm – Dr. Sam Clark (Lancaster)
‘Innocence to Experience: Siegfried Sassoon and human life in time’

“In this talk I use the soldier-poet Siegfried Sassoon's account of his life, from pre-war innocence to the experience of fighting in the trenches, to uncover and describe three ethical features of human life in time: temporal shape, transformative experience, and the incompatibility of military and domestic forms of life.”



Thursday 10th March, 7-8pm – Dr. Rob Lawlor (Leeds)
‘Climate Change and Responsibility: combining history and ethics’

“This presentation will focus on the question of whose responsibility it should be to address climate change, focusing in particular on 4 groups: the general public, the engineering profession, large corporations, and the government. My background is in moral philosophy, but my arguments will also draw on historical perspectives, particularly drawing on the history of rationing in the two world wars, the history of slavery (and the abolition of slavery), and the medical profession’s development of the Declaration of Helsinki.”


Thursday 17th March, 7-8pm – Dr. Ian Kidd (Nottingham)
‘Can Illness Make Me a Better Person?

“I am assistant professor at Nottingham Philosophy (since January 2016) and previously Addison Wheeler Fellow at Durham Philosophy and lecturer in philosophy of religion at Leeds. I work in epistemology and the philosophies of medicine, religion, and science. My research spans the analytic, phenomenological, and Asian philosophical traditions.”





21-02-16


At the end of a week that has seen David Cameron return from EU talks with a new set of terms designed to persuade the population of the UK of the advantages of staying in Europe, Judges rule that the Joint Enterprise Law has been misinterpreted for 30 years, and J K Rowling announces a Harry Potter play to make its stage debut in July, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Richard Trevitt, from the Lancaster Canal Trust, visited us to talk about our wonderful canal, its history and the possibilities the future may hold. We heard about the birth of this historic transport route and were introduced to some of the characters who made it a reality. Richard showed us some of the architectural features which grace the 40 or so miles of the canal, including Rennie’s handsome aqueduct, opened in 1797.

We also looked at the project which aims to coordinate the restoration of the ‘Northern Reaches’ and saw some of the recent damage which has occurred due to the extreme weather and localised flooding. Richard explained to us that, though still hopeful regarding the restoration and reopening of the ‘Northern Reaches’, there is a recognition that the recent flood damage has impacted on this programme quite considerably.

I will aim to put the audio recording of the lecture online over the next week. However, as this was a very image heavy lecture, I am looking into the possibility of also posting Richard’s PowerPoint presentation if copyright allows. If this is not possible, then I hope to post some of the key images used in the talk.

http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

We followed on after the talk, not with a Research & Discussion Forum as I wrongly stated in last week’s CLG News, but with a guided tour around the University Library by Lynne Pickles and her colleague. This followed on from the talk we had a couple of weeks back, and gave group members a great chance to experience the huge changes first hand. The general feeling was that the refurbishment has been a success and that was reinforced by the many studious young people dotted all around the building, deeply focused on their work.


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (24th February 2016) Antony Crowley of Costain Engineering will visit to talk with us about 'The Construction and Challenges of the M6-Heysham Link Road'.

In this talk, Antony will take us through the link road construction process and discuss the challenges Costain have encountered along the way. Antony has worked with Costain as a community relations officer for six and a half years now. Prior to taking this post, he worked as a police officer in Greater Manchester for thirty one years.


Other News…

Change is coming to the CLG. For various reasons, several members have decided to leave the Steering Group. Irene, who has undertaken the secretarial role for the past 6 years, has already finished. Jean, who has put together the programme of lectures for this year in collaboration with John Marshall, is leaving with effect from the end of this term. Jill has also decided to finish with effect from the end of the summer term. This creates an opportunity for new people to get involved in the Steering Group to manage the CLG programme. So if you value what is on offer, please think about volunteering and get involved. In order to consider the future direction of the CLG, we intend to use the Research & Discussion Forum this coming Wednesday (February 24th) to facilitate a discussion around what members of the CLG would like to see in the future, so we hope you will attend. If you are unable to attend, you might like to email any thoughts and ideas to us at seniorlearners@lancaster.ac.uk




14-02-16


At the end of a week that has seen the Independent newspaper announce the end of its printed edition in favour of a purely online version, an announcement that companies failing to provide equal pay will be named and shamed under the Government's new league table-style rankings, and Health Secretary, Jeremy Hunt, impose new contract conditions on junior doctors despite fierce opposition, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday Alan Beattie gave his talk on Survivors’ Poetry. This talk had been scheduled for the end of last term but was postponed due to the power cuts caused by extensive flooding.

Alan took us through a wide variety of poetry born out of, and focused around, mental health issues. We looked at how poetry has been able to give a voice to those with a burning need to be understood and how it can provide the perfect mode of expression for complex personal feelings. Survivors’ Poetry exists to help all survivors combat the effects of mental distress in the most creative and personally empowering ways possible, and this was very evident in the poems we looked at. Alan expertly read a number of poems to us. These ranged from the darkest and most despairing to the light-hearted and irreverent.

We followed on from the lecture with the Research and Discussion Forum, where we discussed issues raised in the session and looked at some original, as yet unpublished, poems.

The two sessions were deeply moving and, in many ways, uplifting. We were able to gain a greater understanding of mental illness and the human condition. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Alan for his excellent input and also thank group members who shared very personal thoughts, ideas and details.

I will be posting the audio recording of the lecture part of the afternoon online during the week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (17th February 2016) Richard Trevitt of Lancaster Canal Trust will present his Lunchtime Lecture on ‘The History of the Lancaster Canal'.

Richard Trevitt has had a lifelong fascination for canals, with many boating holidays. An interest in canal industrial archaeology and a career in maritime civil engineering led to an involvement with the local canal, its preservation and restoration. The presentation will cover various aspects of the development of the canal, its commercial history, the decline of its northern reaches and the move towards its restoration.

Following on from Richard’s talk, there will be no Research & Discussion Forum. Instead there will be a guided tour around the University Library.

Events will begin in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 at 1pm.



For more information on future Lunchtime Lectures, take a look here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures


Thanks, have a good week!



07-02-16


At the end of a week that has seen the debate around Britain’s inclusion in Europe step up a notch, the possibility of a Sunday trading overhaul come back on the table, and a natural phenomenon known as a circumhorizontal arc create colourful displays in the sky over the North of England, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, David Waines, Emeritus Professor with the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion visited us to talk about the travels of the 14th century writer, Ibn Battuta.

‘Ibn Battuta was, without doubt, one of the world's truly great travellers. Born in 14th century Morocco, and a contemporary of Marco Polo, Ibn Battuta has left us an account in his own words of his remarkable journeys throughout the Islamic world and beyond: journeys punctuated by adventure and peril, and stretching from his home in Tangiers to Zaytun in faraway China. Whether sojourning in Delhi and the Maldives, wandering through the mazy streets of Cairo and Damascus, or contesting with pirates and shipwreck, the indefatigable Ibn Battuta brings to vivid life a medieval world brimming with marvel and mystery. ‘

If you would like to know more about this remarkable historic figure and his fascinating travels, there are a number of excellent books available on the subject, including David Waines’ own book, ‘The Odyssey of Ibn Battuta: Uncommon Tales of a Medieval Adventurer’ available from all good bookshops and Amazon.com in paperback and Kindle versions.


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (10th February 2016) Professor Alan Beattie, formerly of the Department of English and Creative Writing here at Lancaster University, will present his Lunchtime Lecture, 'Writing Bare Lives and Liquid Times? - Poetry written by survivors of psychiatry'

‘In so-called Survivors’ Poetry – poems written about their own experience by people who have undergone psychiatric treatment - metaphors of mobility are prominent as ways of capturing elusive aspects of the experience of mental distress (flight, escape, wandering, journeys to recovery, etc.). Are activists within the mad movement casualties of the new ‘liquid times’ or are they its cartographers? What might we learn from the work of survivor-poets who create fragmented, ‘palimpsest’ identities that resist the ‘forced choreographies’ of 21st century life?

Alan has 40 years of experience as NHS professional, university teacher and researcher, and community activist at local and national levels, and has also worked in theatre, and writes plays and poetry. His current preoccupation is ‘how to write a world in transition’ – what forms of textual innovation can help to capture the bare lives and liquid times of the 21st century?’

NOTE: This lecture is rescheduled from the end of last term due to the power cuts which forced an early term break.

The lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where group members will bet the chance to discuss further issues raised in the lecture.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

For more information on this and other lectures, visit here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures






31-01-16


At the end of a week that has seen a young British man save money travelling between Sheffield and Essex by introducing a visit to the Brandenburg Gate into his travel plans, MPs face the prospect of no booze at work as plans for refurbishment of the Palace of Westminster go ahead, and hundreds of hopefuls contacted the National Lottery to say they correctly chose the winning six numbers in the recent £66m draw but either lost or damaged their tickets, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last week Jenny Brine and Lyne Pickles visited us from the Lancaster University Library to tell us the full story of the recent refurbishment.

We learned how the library has changed and grown from its humble beginnings occupying the old workshops of Shrigley and Hunt on Castle Hill, in the centre of the town. Designed in 1964 by Tom Mellor and Partners, The original on-campus Library building (The East Building) had its first phase opening in September 1966, the second in July 1968 and the third in January 1971. The Library was extended in 1997 with the addition of The West Building which houses the large reading room.

The refurbishment, at a cost of £15 million, has seen facilities brought right up to date with the Library now offering a flexible, inspiring, technology-enabled environment with a range of individual and group work spaces to support different learning styles. The building, which utilises white American oak wood throughout, has been redesigned to maximise natural light and offers a significant increase in power and data provision. The Library is the first refurbishment project on campus to target a BREEAM Excellent standard, a measure of the building's environmental performance and impact….and yes, it still has books.

We encourage all our group members and lecture attendees to make good use of the new facilities. You are welcome to read the books and enjoy the space any time of the day or night (the library is open 24/7). However, if you wish to borrow books, there is a yearly charge for CLG members. Any of the desk staff will be happy to help with any queries you may have.

Next Week…

This coming Wednesday (3rd February 2016) David Waines, Emeritus Professor with the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion here at Lancaster University, will give his Lunchtime Lecture, 'Worldly Desire and Heavenly Hope: The Travels of Ibn Battuta, 14th Century'.

"There have been a number of approaches to this fascinating character by a number of authors... One of the difficulties I found in writing the book was selecting an interesting approach that had not been covered by my predecessors. The solution that suggested itself was to cover topics that seemed of real interest to Ibn Battuta himself, owing to the amount of space he devoted to certain subjects in the course of his multi-volumed account of 30 years travel. Thus I have decided to cover his fascination with food and codes of hospitality he encountered in his travels. Next, there is the (perhaps) obvious subject of saints and sinners, miracles and marvels. And finally, but by no means least in importance: his views of "the other", identification of which or whom will be disclosed on the day."

David’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where group members will be able to explore further issues raised in the lecture.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

More information can be found here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures



24-01-16


At the end of a week that has seen the finger pointed at Russian President Vladimir Putin over the murder of former Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko in London, reports state that violent crime in the UK is up 37 per cent - the largest jump in over a decade, and Britain facing a ginger nut shortage as a result of the recent floods, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, Dr Giovanni Bettini spoke with us on the issue of mass migration, with particular focus on the likely effects of climate change on population movement. Giovanni explored the media’s treatment of the recent migration issues in Europe as a ‘crisis’ which requires a solution and instead looked at the likelihood of further, climate driven, migration and the adaptation needed to adjust and accommodate such events in the future, this being the only actual solution open to Europe. Giovanni explored how the issue has been framed in a way that is counterproductive and problematic. He explored the possible extent the issue of future climate change migration might present and demonstrated how this is likely to dwarf the issue of war migration which we are currently facing.

Giovanni’s lecture was then followed by an interesting Research & Discussion Forum where group members discussed the broad range of migration issues and the adaptation needed throughout Europe to move forward successfully.

Next week…

As you may know, Lancaster University has recently undergone extensive refurbishment of its on-campus library facilities. This coming Wednesday (27th January 2016) Academic Liaison Librarian for Content, Jenny Brine and Library Assistant with Operations and Services, Lynne Pickles will visit us to talk about all the changes that have taken place and to encourage group members to make good use of the facilities available. The University Library is a fantastic resource, offering a wealth of information and knowledge to all CLG attendees. The recent changes have made it even more so. Come along to Jenny and Lynne’s talk, it will help you to get to grips with this outstanding resource which is there for our benefit.

Following on from the library talk, we will have the usual Research & Discussion Forum. Generally, this part of the day is filled with discussion around the content of the lecture. This week we are asking attendees ‘what is on your mind?’ What burning questions do you have? What do you find interesting/inspiring/frustrating in current affairs right now? What are your hopes and fears? This is a chance for you to drive this part of the day. If you have something to discuss, let’s discuss it.

Both the library talk and the Research & Discussion Forum will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm. More information can be found here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

Have a good week.



17-01-16


At the end of a week when the world said goodbye to rock legend and artist David Bowie, three men were convicted for their involvement in the Hatton Garden jewellery heist, and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn’s fans raised over £2,000 to buy him his dream bike, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, Dr Garrath Williams of the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion, presented his lecture 'Politics of Obesity'.

Garrath spoke about the economic and political forces surrounding the rapid rise of obesity rates in developed societies. He explored the key factors that have led to this rise, and how we might think about ways to address it. His main focus was on how media and political discussion tend to frame obesity as a matter of individual or parental responsibility. Garrath went on to argue that this framing has been led by commercial interests and has ignored one simple fact: the massive commercial interest in encouraging consumption of processed food and drink, rather than whole foods.

Garrath presented his findings with particular attention payed to how increasingly difficult it has become to achieve positive health and dietary outcomes inside the framework of mainstream, contemporary society, which runs to a very different agenda.

We followed the lecture with a Research & Discussion Forum, where we looked closer at the barriers to healthy living, which we have personally encountered.

I will be putting the audio recording of the lecture online later in the week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


Next week…


This coming Wednesday (20th January 2016) Dr Giovanni Bettini, Lecturer with Lancaster Environment Centre, will present his Lunchtime Lecture, 'Unsettling Futures: climate change, migration, and the immobility of climate politics'.

The focus of Giovanni’s work is on the genealogy and political effects of discourses on climate change, population, and international development, with a particular interest in the connections between climate change, adaptation and mobility.

‘The message that climate science and current emission trajectories are sending is clear: limiting global warming to 2°C is more and more an unlikely prospect. This predicament is hard to apprehend also because a 3 or 4 °C warmer planet is a largely unknown place, where socioecological spaces and relations look different. Visualizing the impacts of such severe climate change – and of our responses to it – requires a radical imaginative effort.’

Giovanni’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum. No doubt there will be a large number of issues raised which warrant further discussion, and the Forum will provide the ideal chance for this.

Other News…

You may recall that in 2015 we hosted a half day, conference-style event at Lancaster Library which was entitled ‘Medicine, Memory and Melancholy’. This was very successful and we intend to host a second event along the same lines, though with a different theme, on May the 4th (increasingly referred to as ‘Star Wars Day’….think about it) of this year. The theme is currently being settled, but it looks like it will focus on education/learning. So, please keep the date for your diary as we would like our regular CLG News readers and lecture attendees to attend if they wish. May the 4th (be with you…there you have it, Star Wars Day!)

Thanks for your attention, have a good week.






10-01-16


Hello,

I would like to start by saying that we in the CLG Steering Group hope you’ve had a good break over the Christmas and New Year period and are ready for the forthcoming term. This term promises to be extremely interesting, packed with lots of stimulating lectures in a broad range of subjects.

Our new term begins this coming Wednesday (13th January 2016) with Dr. Garrath Williams, Senior Lecturer with the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Religion here at Lancaster University. He will present his lecture 'Politics of Obesity'.
Garrath works on questions of moral and political responsibility and in applied ethics. For the past eight years, he has been involved in two large European research projects on childhood obesity (see www.ifamily.eu ). With K Voigt and S Nicholls, he wrote Childhood Obesity: Ethical and Policy Issues (OUP, 2014).
Garrath will talk about the economic and political forces surrounding the rapid rise of obesity rates in developed societies. What are the key factors that have led to this rise, and how should we think about ways to address this rise? His main theme will be how media and political discussion tend to frame obesity as a matter of individual or parental responsibility. Garrath will argue that this framing has been led by commercial interests and ignores one simple fact: the massive commercial interest in encouraging consumption of processed food and drink, rather than whole foods.

You may remember Garrath's previous visit to talk with us about the life and politics of Hannah Arendt a couple of years back. We are very pleased to welcome him again and look forward to his lecture, the opening lecture of 2016.


Garrath’s talk will be followed the Research and Discussion Forum, where group members will have plenty of chance to explore further many of the issues raised.

As with last term, both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm, with the R&DF beginning around 2:45pm.

I am currently populating the website with details of all of this term’s lectures as they are confirmed. As usual, the details will develop over the coming weeks. You can find them here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures

We look forward to your company this term.

Best wishes,

Dave

(on behalf of the CLG Steering Group)




08-12-15


Hello,

At the end of a week which has seen mains electricity in very short supply throughout North Lancashire and Cumbria following record breaking levels of rainfall and devastating floods as a result of Storm Desmond, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward towards the future.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, Dr Celia Roberts, Senior Lecturer with the Department of Sociology at Lancaster University presented her lecture ‘Puberty in Crisis? A sociological account of contemporary changes to childhood and the timing of sexual development’.

Celia spoke extensively on the fact that puberty is appearing earlier in young people, particularly girls. She looked at possible causes as well as consequences and possible ways we might deal with this change. Celia is the author of three books on sexuality, reproduction and sexual development, including Puberty in Crisis: The Sociology of Early Sexual Development (Cambridge University Press, 2015). Her talk was informative and thought provoking and this meant that the group were able to have a vibrant discussion afterwards in the Research and Discussion Forum.

I intend to upload the audio version of the lecture to our website when I can. With the regular power cuts we are currently experiencing, this may take a while. Please bear with me. Thanks.

http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

This week…

We were looking forward to bringing you our final lecture of the tearm/year this coming Wednesday. Unfortunately, due to the exceptionally bad weather and consequential disruption to power supplies, Lancaster University has cancelled all lectures in the run up to the Christmas period and advised students to vacate the campus early. We apologise that we are unable to run Professor Alan Beattie’s Lunchtime Lecture at this time. We do, however, plan to reschedule this lecture for sometime in the New Year.

So, this just leaves me to say thank you so much for your attention this term. It has been an excellent term of great lectures and good feedback. The Research and Discussion Forum has gone from strength to strength as we hoped it would. We have enjoyed welcoming new attendees to our events and appreciated the continued company and support of our regular group members.

Lancaster University Lent Term begins on 8th January 2016. Our first lecture will take place on Wednesday 13th January 2016 when Garrath Williams will present his Lunchtime Lecture on ‘The Politics of Obesity’ in the usual venue, Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

I’d like to take this opportunity to wish you a wonderful festive season and a very happy and prosperous New Year. Thanks again for all your support, it is very much appreciated.

Best wishes from myself and the whole CLG Steering Group!

Dave


29-11-15


At the end of a week which has seen the people of France honour those killed in the recent terrorist attacks, UK Prime Minister David Cameron put forward the case for air strikes on Syria, and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn take a firm stand against possible airstrikes on the grounds that they are likely to worsen the situation, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday Annie Nissen, Lancaster University researcher presented us with her lecture 'The Cinematic Return of the Stage: A Discussion of Frankenstein Adaptations from 1910 and 2011'.

‘The recent cinematic turn to the stage through the National Theatre Live initiative appears to have made a return to the beginnings of film, which at that point was often seen as a form of filmed theatre. In her lecture, Annie discussed the connection of stage and screen at the beginning of the 20th and 21st centuries with the help of two hybrid film-theatre adaptations of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Through these. Annie addressed the significance of the cinematic return to the theatrical stage and the implications this might have for the historical relationship of these two media.’


If you would like to listen to Annie’s lecture, you can do so here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



Next week…

This coming Wednesday (2nd December 2015) Dr Celia Roberts, Senior Lecturer with Department of Sociology, here at Lancaster University will present her lecture ‘Puberty in Crisis? A sociological account of contemporary changes to childhood and the timing of sexual development’.

‘Celia is Co-Director of the Centre for Gender and Women’s Studies and Senior Lecturer in the Department of Sociology. She is the author of three books on sexuality, reproduction and sexual development, including Puberty in Crisis: The Sociology of Early Sexual Development (Cambridge University Press, 2015).’

This will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get the chance to discuss issues raised in the lecture.



Other news…


Lancaster Arts Present:

Phoenix Dance Theatre: Mixed Programme 2015
Works by Christopher Bruce CBE, Caroline Finn and Sharon Watson.
Tue 1st Dec - 20:00 - 22:00
Wed 2nd Dec - 20:00 - 22:00

Mixed Programme 2015 features a double bill by one of the most influential figures in world dance, Christopher Bruce CBE including a brand new work, Shadows created by him especially for Phoenix Dance Theatre and a restaging of Christopher’s energetic study of life in the 1940’s, Shift. Having choreographed works for leading dance companies across the globe, this is the first time that Phoenix will perform any of this renowned choreographer’s work.

The work also features two world premieres Phoenix Artistic Director Sharon Watson follows up her audience favourites Melt (2011) and Repetition of Change (2013) with TearFall, a new piece that builds on her exploration of science through dance using her simultaneously mesmerising and athletic choreography style. The fourth piece is Bloom by exciting new choreographer and New Adventures Choreographer Award winner Caroline Finn whose work often presents darkly comic expressions of life and humanity using her playful, quirky and highly engaging choreographic style.


And…


Winter Words: Walls/Ashworth/Lambert
Wed 2nd Dec - 16:30

Winter Words -readings from Jenn Ashworth, Zoe Lambert and Eoghan Walls
Wine reception from 4.15pm
(This is a Lancaster University's Department of English & Creative Writing event)


And…


Panic Lab: R.I.O.T.
Fri 4th Dec - 20:00 - 21:25

A comic book come to life in martial arts inspired dance theatre.

In a world of blockbuster adaptations and endless reboots, four performers dream of being awesome. Playing superheroes, they are caught in a series of conflicts which are both personal, and intricately political. The ultimate battle between good and evil becomes a struggle for identity and representation, in a story they didn’t choose. Spiced with comic book and action hero references, the epic adventure unfolds through action-packed choreography and projected illustrations.

Suitable for ages 12+, or younger if accompanied by an adult. Contains some strong language and staged violence. The show contains loud noises and bright lights. Commissioned by Dance City, in association with Cambridge Junction, MDI, Unity Theatre. Made at The Place Funded by the National Lottery through Arts Council England.


For more information on all the above events, visit the Lancaster Arts website:
https://www.lancasterarts.org/whats-on


Thanks, have a great week,



22-11-15


At the end of a week which has seen junior doctors preparing to take unprecedented strike action over new contracts, GCHQ intelligence service launch a graffiti advertising campaign to recruit new members and temperatures dramatically plummet around the UK, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Professor Simon Bainbridge of the Department of English & Creative Writing presented his Lunchtime Lecture ‘Wordsworth, War and Waterloo’.

Drawing on the materials included in the Wordsworth Trust’s exhibition to mark the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo, Simon considering Wordsworth’s complex response to the British victory. He showed the group that while best known as a nature poet, Wordsworth can also be understood as a war poet whose career and greatest works were shaped by the age of conflict in which he lived.

Simon’s lecture dealt with both aspects of Wordsworth’s life and the challenges of curating an exhibition with an aim to change the public’s understanding of an artist’s output. Simon did this expertly and opened up the subject to us all for further exploration.

We then went on in the Research and Discussion Forum to discuss this concept of Wordsworth as a war poet, focusing on the changes that took place in his political outlook with regard to the events of the time.

If you would like to listen to the Lecture Lecture, I will be posting it to the website soon:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (25th November 2015) Annie Nissen, a researcher here at Lancaster University, will present her Lunchtime Lecture 'The Cinematic Return of the Stage: A Discussion of Frankenstein Adaptations from 1910 and 2011'

The recent cinematic turn to the stage through the National Theatre Live initiative appears to have made a return to the beginnings of film, which at that point was often seen as a form of filmed theatre. Annie’s lecture will discuss the connection of stage and screen at the beginning of the 20th and 21st centuries with the help of two hybrid film-theatre adaptations of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. Through these, Annie aims to address the significance of the cinematic return to the theatrical stage and the implications this might have for the historical relationship of these two media.

Annie’ s main area of interest lies in Adaptation Studies and her research investigates the role of authorship in literature to film adaptations, concentrating on early film history. She completed a BA in Film Studies and English Literature in 2010 and an MA in Literary and Cultural Studies in 2011, both at Lancaster University.

Annie’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will get a chance to discuss issues raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.



Other News…

Theatre Double Bill: 2 Shows for the Price of 1!!!
A double bill ticket will allow you into both of these shows in the Nuffield Theatre

7.30pm. Figs in Wigs: Show Off

“You’re so vain you probably think this show is about you. But it’s actually about Figs in Wigs – the lowbrow answer to avant-garde. Show Off nosedives deep into our shallow digital existence, goggling at how social media has bred a new form of narcissism.

In a selfie-obsessed effort to tick every box five performers reintroduce themselves as comedians, dancers, visual artists, musicians and circus entertainers. After all, nowadays one trick ponies rarely make the cut.”

"Figs in Wigs prove that silly and whiplash smart go hand in hand. Terrific fun." Lyn Gardner


9.15pm. Jamie Wood: Beating McEnroe

“Bjorn Borg epitomised tennis cool. He was everything Jamie and his brother wanted to be. Then John McEnroe came along and Jamie was beaten, along with Borg. Thirty years of torment and self-questioning later, Jamie is ready to face his greatest opponent. Beating McEnroe is about being a younger brother and a bad loser. It is about competition and control, vitriol and zen. It is about rivalry and love and how they can both better us and destroy us. It is funny, familiar and strangely beautiful.”

For more on these events, visit the Lancaster Arts website:
https://www.lancasterarts.org/whats-on/double-bill-figs-in-wigs-jamie-wood

Have a good week!




15-11-15


At the end of a week which has seen devastating terrorist attacks on the cities of Beirut and Paris, the UK battered by 90 mph winds from Storm Abigail and the welcome return of light in the form of the Hindu festival of Diwali, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Last Wednesday, Ali Hanbury and Cron Cronshaw, PhD students with the Department of Sociology here at Lancaster University, presented us with ‘An Introduction to Trans-Identified Young People’s Experiences’.

In their talk, Ali and Cron introduced the group to a number of issues which affect trans-identified young people. These ranged from aspects of the social, through the biological and touched on the political. Group members were encouraged to try to adopt the mindset of a trans-person and imagine what kind of issues they would face and how they might begin to deal with them. The group looked at the wide variety of trans experiences and biologies that exist and took time to appreciate the problems which can arise when trans people are viewed as a homogeneous group with a single, shared experience. The group found the lecture very engaging and were very comfortable exploring the issues raised.

I will add some youtube video material on this subject to the website during the week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (18th November 2015) Professor Simon Bainbridge of the Department of English & Creative Writing at Lancaster University will present his Lunchtime Lecture ‘Wordsworth, War and Waterloo’.

Drawing on materials included in the Wordsworth Trust’s exhibition ‘Wordsworth, War and Waterloo’, this lecture will mark the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo by considering Wordsworth’s complex response to the British victory. It will show that while best known as a nature poet, Wordsworth can also be understood as a war poet whose career and greatest works were shaped by the age of conflict in which he lived.

We will follow on from the lecture with the Research & Discussion Forum, where attendees will have plenty of chance to further explore the issues raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.


Other news…

Lancaster University Theatre Group Presents…
‘The Shadow Box’ at The Nuffield Theatre (on campus)
Nov 19th/20th/21st


‘Exploring the human ability to process tragedy, The Shadow Box by Michael Cristopher delves into the intimate moments between families and lovers of the terminally ill patients Joe, Brian and Felicity.

Performed through promenade, their final days play out in three different cottages on the grounds of a hospital where they are being closely monitored.
This scrutiny into human experience asks what it really means to "cope" with inevitable loss.

Please note that as this performance will be a promenade piece the audience will be required to stand and move about the space. However, there will be chairs available if needed.’

For more information on this performance please visit their website:
https://www.lancasterarts.org/whats-on/lu-theatre-group-the-shadow-box


Also…


Lancaster Arts presents...
Montero & Manchester Camerata

Giovanni Guzzo Director/ Violin
Gabriela Montero Piano

PÄRT Fratres
MOZART Piano Concerto No.14 in E-flat major, K.449
MONTERO Improvisations on audience requests
PIAZZOLA The Four Seasons of Buenos Aires
BRITTEN Variations on a Theme of Frank Bridge, Op.10

This dynamic programme features Venezuelan-born musicians Gabriela Montero and Giovanni Guzzo, artists whose music brims with energy and colour. Montero who is famed for her extraordinary improvisatory talents, returns by very popular demand to play Mozart’s mighty Piano Concerto No.14 followed by some audience inspired improvisations. The concert also includes the mesmerising Fratres by Arvo Pärt, Paul Desenne’s exotic Two Seasons, performed by the superlative Manchester Camerata.

6.45pm Pre-Concert Talk

For more information on this concert please visit their website:
https://www.lancasterarts.org/whats-on/montero-manchester-camarata


Have a good week,






08-11-15


At the end of a week when Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn faced dissent from his back bench MPs, HMRC came under fire for only answering around half of calls made by taxpayers looking to organise their payments and police and crime commissioners threaten to seek a judicial review over proposed changes to the way police forces are funded in England and Wales, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Last Wednesday, Dawn Stobbart, PhD Student with the Department of English & Creative Writing at Lancaster University gave her Lunchtime Lecture ‘Reading, Watching Playing: Videogames and Narrative’.

Dawn discussed the change in video games, from the simple style of early games such as Tetris and Pacman with their focus on basic geometric solutions to problems and navigation of a modest maze, to the sophistication of modern games which employ complex stories and work more like novels.

Dawn looked at the game ‘Bioshock’, which is not only inspired by the theory of Objectivism that radical author/philosopher Ayn Rand developed and championed in her written work, but features a narrative which functions chiefly as a frightening critique of a society shaped in the image of her political and economic beliefs.

I will be posting the lecture, in audio format, later in the week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (11th November 2015 ), Ali Hanbury & Cron Cronshaw, both PhD Students with the Department of Sociology here at Lancaster University will give their Lunchtime Lecture,
'An Introduction to Trans- Identified Young People’s Experiences'

Cron is a second year PhD student, in the department of Sociology, researching the decision-making processes of parents with gender-variant children. Cron is currently doing an ESRC-funded internship with Trans Alliance, an organisation in Brighton, which provides trans awareness training to medical professionals, third sector workers and private businesses.

Ali is a professional youth and community worker with particular interest in anti-discriminatory practice, feminist youth work and sexual health from a pleasure perspective. Ali manages the LGBT centre in Manchester which is the first publicly funded centre of its kind in Europe. Ali’s PhD is funded through the European Research Council and focuses on young women's experiences of the HPV vaccination.

Cron and Ali’s lecture will then be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where attendees will have plenty of chance to discuss issues raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.

Hope you can make it!




01-11-15


At the end of a week when peace talks, aimed at ending Syria's bloody civil war, get underway in Vienna, the last British person in Guantanamo Bay is released after 13 years without charge or trial and online 'hacktivist' collective ‘Anonymous' announce they will release IDs of up to 1,000 Ku Klux Klan members, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…

Three people from the National Grid, Amy, Deborah and Gordon, came to speak with us about the ‘North-West Connections Project’. We were expecting Stephen Radford-Hancock, but he was unable to make it due to unforeseen circumstances. The three visitors explained how the project aims to connect the forthcoming Moorside Nuclear Power Station, which will be alongside the existing Sellafield Nuclear Power Station and run by New Gen, to the National Grid.

If you would like to find out more, I will be posting the audio recording of the talk here during the week:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (4th November 2015) Dawn Stobbart, PhD Student with the Department of English & Creative Writing here at Lancaster University will give her Lunchtime Lecture ‘Reading, Watching Playing: Videogames and Narrative’

Dawn is in the final stages of PhD study here at Lancaster University. She has a B.A. (Hons) in English Literature and a M.A. (Hons) in Contemporary Literature, and is currently focusing on the way that video games function as a carrier for narrative and its role within this medium as part of her study. She has an interest in contemporary literature and especially the way this translates to the videogame. Within videogame studies, she has conducted research into Gothic fiction, Posthuman fiction, folklore, and focused on how video games construct narratives for these genres. Dawn is also interested in contemporary Gothic fiction and is currently exploring Stephen King’s work as a source for academic study.

In this lecture, Dawn will touch on aspects of her topic such as adaptation as well as narrative structure.

Dawn’s lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where there will be a chance to discuss further some of the issues raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm.


Other news…

Defying Dementia are running a special campus tour on Monday 9th November (as mentioned in a previous CLG News)

‘Our Campus Tours are designed to acquaint you with our friendly campus. The tour begins at 1.30pm in Alexandra Square. Current students will take you on a guided tour of the campus, showing you our award winning student accommodation, social venues, library and a lot more besides! The tour finishes at approximately 2.45pm. After the tour you may wish to visit our state of the art sports centre, located at the entrance to campus. Staff from the Sports Centre will be on hand to show you the facilities and answer any questions you may have about sport at Lancaster.’

Please book if you would like to take part.
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/campus-tour-9th-november-2015-tickets-15909412481?aff=erellivsim

And finally…

One more reminder that the Roadless Trip is returning to campus on November 5th.
http://www.artsadmin.co.uk/events/3769

If you are on campus for the Roadless Trip, you will also get the chance to see the Lancaster University firework display which also takes place that night. This family-friendly event, run as part of our World at Lancaster programme, will bring together Lancaster’s global community to mark this uniquely British celebration.

Join attendees in Lancaster Square from 5.30pm for brilliant live performances from students and a selection of hot food to keep you warm. The firework finale will start at 7.45pm.

More info can be found here:
http://lusu.co.uk/10680/enjoy-our-spectacular-firework-display/

Don’t miss it!






25-10-15


At the end of a week when the President of the People’s Republic of China, Mr Xi Jinping paid a visit to the UK, one of the major telecommunication companies admitted to having large amounts of customer’s bank details stolen and controversial cuts proposed to tax credit payments threaten relations between the Lords and the Commons, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.


Last week…

Susanna Bleakley of Morecambe Bay Partnership spoke, with great enthusiasm and passion, about the work she does in our region. She explained some of the challenges in working with an area which spans two different counties. She told us all about the new Bay Cycle Way, which is already attracting visitors from afar and she encouraged us all to think what this beautiful bay means to us. We then went on, in the Research & Discussion Forum to discuss the charity, the bay and the joy of having a chance to explore our feelings on this aspect of our environment.

If you missed the lecture, or if you enjoyed it so much you would like to hear it again, I will be posting it to our main website over the coming days:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures


Next week…

This coming Wednesday (28th October 2015), Stephen Radford-Hancock of the National Grid will present the Lunchtime Lecture on 'The North-West Coast Connections Project'.

Stephen’s presentation will aim to enhance understanding of the Energy Challenge facing the country. It will explore this particular Project’s background, the technologies involved, the Development Programme, Engagement with Communities and Stakeholders and the next steps of this considerable undertaking.

The Lunchtime Lecture will then be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum where all attendees will get the chance to discuss further the issues raised.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm onwards.

For more information on Lunchtime Lectures timetabled for this term visit:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures


Other news…

Lancaster Social Work is hosting
@SWBookGroup
Wednesday 4th November at 5pm in Bowland North Seminar Room 23

“We will be discussing Grace and Mary by Melvyn Bragg 'an insightful, moving tale of ageing and our helplessness in the face of dementia'. Dr Lucy Burke from Manchester Metropolitan University, whose current research focuses on the representation of dementia in contemporary literature and cinema is the guest discussant.”

Coffee and cake from 4.30 pm
Please sign up https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/social‐work‐book‐group‐tickets‐18552167031

More information on the blog: http://wp.lancs.ac.uk/social‐work‐book‐club/

Also…

We have traditionally visited the Ruskin Gallery on campus each term to view their exhibitions. They are consistently good and showcase not only the work of John Ruskin, but also the work of associated contemporary artists. This term, with such a packed programme of events, we are struggling to include a visit. So, I would like to bring your attention to the current exhibition so that you might attend it independently if you wish to continue you exploration of Ruskin’s work and the work of his contemporaries.

Lancaster University Ruskin Library and Research Centre presents…

Ever Present Help: Ruskin's Artists

'Ever Present Help: Ruskin's Artists' includes a comprehensive display of the work of Victorian artists, famous and obscure, who assisted Ruskin at different times throughout his life. The Whitehouse Collection holds a wealth of work by artists who worked closely with Ruskin including Albert Goodwin, John Wharlton Bunney, John Everett Millais, TM Rooke, Angelo Alessandri, Arthur Severn, Edward Burne Jones, WG Collingwood and many more.

This wonderful exhibition is packed full of colour and information on Ruskin and his artist helpers.
If you’re a fan don’t miss this exhibition. It runs 5 October - 11 December 2015.




18-10-15

Hello,
At the end of a week when the pros and cons of Trident have come up for debate, items from the Hatton Garden Robbery were discovered hidden in a cemetery and Boris Johnson made the news with a rugby tackle, we look back over the last week with the CLG and look forward to the coming week.

Last week…
Construction Project Manager with Dong Energy, Stephen Andrew, visited us to discuss the Walney Extension Wind Turbine Project which, in conjunction with Walney 1 and 2, will be the largest offshore wind farm in the world. Stephen gave a fascinating presentation which clearly demonstrated the advantages of offshore wind farms and their role in our future.

Stephen then kindly stayed around to take part in our Research & Discussion Forum where we explored further the role of wind generators in relation to other forms of power generation.

I have posted some of the company’s video material on the website for you to view:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures

Next week…

This coming Wednesday (21st October 2015), Susannah Bleakley, Executive Director of Morecambe Bay Partnership will give her Lunchtime Lecture on the charity she directs.

"Morecambe Bay Partnership is a small charity that makes BIG things happen. We're working hard to bring benefits to the communities, heritage and environment around the Bay. The Partnership has secured over £3.5M of external investment. Funding that would not otherwise have come to the Morecambe Bay area. We aim to help secure £10M in the next 10 years to make more great things happen.

Our projects include the Bay Cycle Way and bringing 2020Vision exhibition to the Bay.

Partnerships are at the very core of how we work. It's how we make BIG things happen even though we are small.

Our core team is just 7 dedicated staff, committed to making great things happen, and all of whom care deeply about the communities of the Bay. We have a wonderful team of volunteers running beach cleans and helping in many other ways."

Executive Director, Susannah Bleakley, has led the Partnership for 16 years, and is full of energy and enthusiasm. Originally from Bolton, she taught sciences in a bush school by Lake Victoria and has been an Exploration Geologist with Shell for 7 years, latterly in Indonesia.

Susannah’s Lecture will be followed by the Research & Discussion Forum, where there will be plenty of chance to explore the issues raised.

The Lunchtime Lecture will run as usual from 1pm in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3, with the Research & Discussion Forum following on in the same room after a refreshment break.

Other News…

You may recall that we were recently visited by Arts Admin who presented their show ‘The Roadless Trip’ by Sarah Woods. Immediately following the performance, audience members were invited to share their thoughts on camera, with a view to incorporating this material into the show. Well, I am pleased to say that the company were happy with our contributions and have incorporated them, and you can experience the new version of the show (possibly now starring you!) at the Nuffield Theatre on 5th November at 6:30pm. All are welcome and you can get further information on this event from the Lancaster Arts website:
lancasterarts.co.uk


11-10-15

Well, the new academic year is well and truly underway.


Last Week…

To start our 10th year, founder of the original Senior Learners Programme, Dr Fiona Frank returned to talk with us about two important aspects of her life. Sustainable living and Judaism. Fiona’s talk was both personal and educational and gave us all a glimpse into both these worlds and how they have come to overlap in her own life. Fiona was introduced by George Henson. The oldest member of our group and one of the original members of the SLP. There was plenty of questions and answers and spirits were high. A wonderful start to the year. Many thanks to Fiona who continues to inspire us all!

If you missed Fiona’s’ lecture, you can listen again at our website:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28E%29+Recordings+of+Lectures



Next Week…

This coming Wednesday (14th October 2015) Stephen Andrew, Construction Project Manager with Dong Energy, will present his Lunchtime Lecture on ‘The Walney Extension Wind Turbine Project’.

Stephen’s presentation will look at the wind turbine project and examine its impact on the local area. He will also provide an introduction to wind turbine science and the types of environmental studies required for a project of this nature.

Following on from the lecture, the Research & Discussion Forum will give everyone a chance to explore themes raised during Stephen’s talk.

Both events will take place in Fylde Lecture Theatre 3 from 1pm onwards.

More details on the Lunchtime Lectures for this term can be found here:
http://senior-learners-forum.wikispaces.com/%28D%29+Lunchtime+Lectures



Other News…

Healthy adult volunteers aged over 55 are needed for a study of eye movements as an early indicator of impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

Researchers at Lancaster University and the Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust are conducting a study to investigate eye movements as a possible way to help diagnose Alzheimer’s disease. We would like to record eye movements and performance on the cognitive tests to see if they might be useful in the future as an aid to diagnosis.

To complete this study we will need to include a group of people who do not have Alzheimer’s disease as a comparison group. An infra-red eye-tracking camera will be used to record your eye movements while you are looking at a computer screen. You will also be asked to complete some tests of your memory and attention. This will involve a series of simple questions that will help to provide more information to help us identify whether the eye movements are related to other functions of the brain. You will not be paid or compensated for your participation. However, the organisers of this research will be able to contribute towards travel costs.

If you would like to be considered as control participant in this research please contact by telephone or email:

Dr. Trevor Crawford: 01524 593761
email: t.crawford@lancaster.ac.uk

Dr. Thomas Wilcockson: 01524 593164
email: t.wilcockson@lancaster.ac.uk


Also, Lancaster University is hosting a 'Walk to Defy Dementia' on Sunday 18th October! A two mile woodland walk at Lancaster University with regular exciting pit-stops and entertainment. Fun for all the family. http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/a-walk-to-defy-dementia-registration-18285958795?aff=website

…and finally, Professor Allsop is presenting a FREE public lecture at The Dukes, Lancaster on his research into Alzheimer's disease and dementia. Defying Dementia: from the laboratory to the clinic will be held on Thursday 22nd October.
http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/public-lecture-defying-dementia-from-the-laboratory-to-the-clinic-tickets-18259561841?aff=CrossReferralLink





04-10-15


Hello,

I hope this post finds you well and refreshed after a pleasant summer break.

We have an exciting year of lectures and events ahead. This academic year is the 10th year of a dedicated senior education programme at Lancaster University. What a journey it has been, and this year promises to be the best year yet! This term, the Michaelmas term, will focus on three academic areas of interest. Environment, Literature and Social Inclusion.

I’m very pleased to announce that we begin our new term this coming Wednesday (7th October 2015) with a Lunchtime Lecture by the founder of the Senior Learners Programme (the original incarnation of the CLG), Dr Fiona Frank.

Since leaving us to complete her PhD and work closely with Jewish communities throughout Scotland and the Scottish Isles, Fiona has also been heavily involved in the creation of an ecological community and also a thriving business centre. Fiona will present ‘The Reluctant Environmentalist’ which draws on her personal experiences over recen